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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
So as my build finally comes to an end I thought I'd share what I've done, alltough its not near enough anything special than whats usually seen on here, to hopefully get some feedback and to perhaps inspire others,
just as many here have inspired and helped me through this experience.


This is my first "real" build I've done, as the only thing prior to this was a simple box with dual 12" subs and a rack ontop with two coax 6x9" and two cheap amps. Built it when I was 16 with all crap components!
Rather embarassingly I found a pic of it;



Didnt care much back then as I had a POS car that barely worked, but since I bought my Audi A4 I've tried to do every mod the best I can.

Planning for this build probably started in October and started with moderate 2-way systems in both front and rear doors with a 10" sub in the back.
I eventually decided to go 2x10" subs, since I do play alot of trance/dance/handsup and am abit of a basshead, and to skip the rear doors and use that money to get even better 2-ways up front.

I was afraid of the depth I had available in the doors since I have the window rail running right behind, so alot of messuring before deciding was done and calculated in AutoCAD



So the final component list is as follows;

HU: Pioneer AVH-P4300DVD
Front: Hertz MLK 2 TW
Rear: OEM
Subs: 2x Hertz HX250
Amps: Hertz HDP4 bridged to Milles & Hertz HDP1
Battery: Varta Silver Dynamic H3 100Ah
Misc: Stinger speaker & power wires, Audison Connection ST2 signal cables, power block and battery terminals

The HU and battery was purchased long before the build was even in the planning stage, more on that in final words and future plans.
As you might notice I used all Hertz products. Partly because of I've read good things about them and partly because it all fit in my budget since I got a nice deal buying all at once from a dealer here in Sweden.



My inital goal and requirements;
- More towards loud SQ orientated sound with enough bass to satisfy my taste of music
- Not to put on to much weight, alltough this kinda got thrown out the window :(
- It wouldnt be much of a "show off" display, but still nice and clean to look at, eg. no plexi/LEDs etc.
- Be able to keep the spare wheel in place
- Finish before summer (Not so much..) Problem I had is I work abroad every other week so I had limited time once I was at home, in addition I dont have a heated garage so there was only so much I could do until spring arrived.
- Not needing to install additional battery

And the car in question is a 2007 Audi A4 Avant 2,0TFSI Quattro that I've owned since March last year.



As mensioned, this is nothing fancy or special compared to what you usually find here, and maybe some of the pictures are boring but I still hope you enjoy looking through this build!
I only have the camera on my phone, excuse the poor quality in some pictures.
And lastly, pictures might not always be in order of how I actually went by!

I will update and upload the build in sections, rather than having 200 pictures on the first page I'll hopefully spread it out abit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Lets get the boring stuff out of the way, running wires and sound proofing.

Almost all of the interior was taken out to ease the running of wires and to do things the right way.




0 gauge power cable through unused grommet next to the battery and beefed up to 0 gauge ground to chassi.
Still got some work here as the OEM Alt>Battery wire was abit short to set the battery terminals straight.






Ground for power block at the rear seats, used a dremel to get a clean surface and used 0 gauge wire with soldered on copper terminal.








As for new speaker wires to the doors I used 15 gauge for the tweeter and 13 gauge for the woofers. I know this is probably overkill, but I sleep better at night knowing I have proper sized and new wire going to them.
I also knew it would be tight with space from reading other builds with the same chassi. Basicly the hole is just the size of the plug that the harness connects to, so I took my dremel and made the hole abit larger at the bottom to fit the wires underneath.






Once through that part, it was easy threading the wire through the original rubber grommet with the rest of the cables and into the door.




I decided to run the RCA's down the center console, using the original wire channels.








Same for the rest of the wiring, using the original wire channels where there was plenty of room for everything. Used some additional zip-ties to keep everything bundled and neat.

Right side: Power, remote and right side speaker wires. Ground wire from back seat and onwards.




Left side: Left side speaker wires. RCA's meet up at back seat and onwards.




And how it looks from the front looking back.



The power and ground wire were routed to where the OEM subwoofer box used to be located, where the power block now will sit.




I swapped from a beige to a black headliner last autumn and while it was down I sound proofed with Silent coat.






I did put down some Silent Coat on the floor and other larger "naked" areas but didnt take any pictures because I was in a hurry getting the carpet back in as I needed the car for a week abroad for work.
Didnt want to add to much weight to the car as I also want it to be as fast as possible, but I think I did a sufficient amount of deadening in the cabin to make a difference.

More to come tomorrow, stay tuned!
 

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awesome!!

wish I had the patience to rip out my entire interior for wire and deadening. seems so simple once its out tho, will have to do it on my next vehicle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Now onto the doors.
As I recognize the importance of a proper install making the most out of, to me, expensive components I spent alot of time to seal and deaden them as well I could.

Starting with fabrication of the spacers in MDF, I opted for this rather than cutting out the OEM speakers and using the plastic "ring" that I've seen some do.
With MDF spacers I could decide the exact depth to the door card and also more importantly a sturdier mount to prevent flexing.
I removed the door cards lots of times to get the right messurements to optimize them to the speaker depth and the OEM door card seal, you will see what I mean later on.

The spacer would be 38mm thick, so two layers of 19mm MDF would be perfect.

Poor mans jigg and possibly the oldest plunge router known to mankind, but it got the job done.



First made a hole to fit the speaker diameter, but not all the way through.
Afterwards I drew the figure from a template of the OEM spacer to fit the mounting holes.




Then set my jigg to cut the outsides where it was circular and then back to the speaker hole to cut that all the way through.
For the remaining cutting of the figure I used a jigsaw




For the second layer of MDF I used the same fashion but I left the bottom "arrow" bit and just did it circular.




Since I really wanted to be able to screw on the speakers real tight I countersank M4 T-nuts inbetween the two layers of MDF before glueing them together.














Then I coated them with a mix of fiberglass resin and bondo, and finally painted them. It will hopefully protect them abit against moisture softening them up over time.






Heres the door card, moist shield and window regulator motor removed. Exposing two larger holes and two smaller that needed to be sealed shut.




I concidered sheets of metal, but in the end the only "right way" in my mind was fiberglassing.
I've not worked with fiberglass prior to this so dont expect much!
Started with the three easier holes and covering up eveything else to protect against the resin. Put some cardboard behind to get a flat surface then some painters tape with moldwax smeared on.






The top hole was abit more tricky as the door card handle goes into that hole about 10mm.




Once cured they popped off nicely and made a clear contour of the hole!
They were then trimmed and holes drilled for selftapping screws to fasten them with.






Silent coated the outer door skin with two layers and the middle with one. Door cards also got some love.








For mounting the spacer to the door I used some bolts and nuts. The OEM spacer was just screwed into a piece of plastic wedged into a hole that popped right out, so not very ideal if you want it tightened down hard.




First some silicone between the spacer and door skin, then I used some dynaliner as a seal for the speaker.




Onto the OEM door card seal. At first I had plans on just removing it but instead I tried to make the best I could to keep it functioning somewhat.
Its hard to see from the picture, but I made the spacer to just sit a few mm from the seal, as shown when I testfitted for the last time.
To make it abit sturdier I added silent coat and then used a quite thick CCF strip on the spacer where the "lip" press on to create a seal to the door panel.








Here you can see how its pressing against the CCF strip and thus minimizing sound escaping into the door panel instead of into the cabin.




Then to finish up on the doors I put a layer of Dynaliner over everything and then some silicone around the edges for all the fiberglass plates and screwed them on.








Terminals crimped and soldered, connected to speaker and then some shrinkwrap on.




Another problem I had was how to mount the tweeters since they were quite abit larger than OEM ones.
The OEM tweeter clips into the speaker grille.




So I mocked up my own way of getting them to stay behind the grille. Im not very proud of this way, feels "ricey" but I didnt see much of an option if I wanted to keep them behind the OEM grille.
I layed a couple of layers of fiberglass mat and shaped strips to make the tweeter fit into, then glued that onto the panel itself with some PL400.








Then I just trimmed off the "mount" for the OEM tweeter and it still fit nicely.






The grilles for the woofer was also quite dense. Theese cannot be taken off then put back on again since they are "plastic-welded" onto the door card. New ones cost about $10 so no big deal.
I drilled out most part and then used the dremel to still keep some of the protection, then again used PL400 to glue bits of wood on the backside so I could staple "acoustic transparent" cloth over them and
use a old soldering gun to fasten the new grilles back on.
I tried doing the same for the tweeter grilles aswell, but it turned out the clips wouldnt reach to snap on when the cloth was wrapped around the plastic grille.


















And everything back together and finished, while still looking OEM-ish. Real thudd when closing the doors now, and 0 rattle.

 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
awesome!!

wish I had the patience to rip out my entire interior for wire and deadening. seems so simple once its out tho, will have to do it on my next vehicle.
It sure did help alot, but oh-what-a-pain.. Especially since I probably have some sort of condition when I just couldnt lay the carpet or trim back together without wiping it all down nice and clean first! ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
For the power/fuseblock I thought it would be nice to utilize the space that opened up when I removed the stock subwoofer box which sits behind a "hatch" on the right side of the trunk.






The first idea beeing to just cut out a piece of MDF about the shape of the OEM box and let that be that...




But with just that, it wouldnt cover up all of the "naked" metal from the chassi/body so it soon escalated into covering all sides and the wheelwell. Which meant fiberglassing again, and as you can see I managed to get a massive air pocket but
since its not of structural importance I didnt care to mend it.








After I had the rough shape finished, I utilized the stock mounting points with some strips of holepunched iron-something.. (Couldnt find the name for it in english)
Then I started the tedious work of smoothing the angles out with bondo.






Next was fitting some nice grommets for the wires to run through. I knew what I wanted them to look like, but took alot of time before I finally found cheap ear piercing "tunnels" on ebay in various sizes which looked just as I wanted it.
Then I countersinked behind them and later used hotglue to make them sit still.








For the fuseblock I got some chrome piping to raise it about 10mm from the surface.






Then painted flat black, and as a final touch I drew the "Audison Connection" logo in Adobe Illustrator as a vectorized image and sent it to a designshop who lasercut it into a sticker for me.








As a last minute thing, I decided to keep my stock amplifier which runs the rear door speakers. I thought it might still be nice to have some sound at the back for when I have passangers back there.
Since this wasnt planned for it ended up in a wierd place and not really good looking, but it was the only place it would fit screwed on to the back.



 

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Incredibly impressive work! I love the ear "tunnels". Never would have thought of that.
Looking forward to more from this build.

By the way, Robolop being impressed should make you proud! He has done the most amazing work I have ever seen in a vehicle. His BMW build thread here is fantastic.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
That already looks very good.
Incredibly impressive work! I love the ear "tunnels". Never would have thought of that.
Looking forward to more from this build.

By the way, Robolop being impressed should make you proud! He has done the most amazing work I have ever seen in a vehicle. His BMW build thread here is fantastic.
Thanks to both of you! Yea, I think the ear tunnels came out great.. And not expensive coming from Hong Kong!

And Robolop's BMW was probably one of the first threads I came across here on DIYMA, just amazing stuff.
Im just happy knowing that there are a choosen few that read this! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
For the amprack I made a MDF board to lay ontop of the spare wheel.
To start off I had a curve tool that I got the shapes from and then took thoose curves to make a template out of cardboard and voila!












Tried out some different layouts of the amps and filters, alltough the amps are very small the filters are massive so I didnt have much options here if I didnt want to cross power wires with the signal cable and risking induced noise.






To keep with the same design I used to the fuseblock, I made the amps raised up 10mm with bits of chrome copper pipe and got even more fiddely with the filters that I wanted to tilt forward for a better look.
Since I needed to screw them down, I got some round sticks of wood that fit inside the chrome pipes and glued them onto the MDF in the angle I needed.




After all holes were drilled I sprayed a few layers of clearcoat and then vinyl wrapped it with 3M 1080p Scotchprint matte black. Screwed everything down and glued on the ear piercing tunnels in the holes.











 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thank you for the kind words, really encouraging and rewarding after all the time spent to hear such things from people on a board like this.
 

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congrats for your amazing skills!!!
the work done on the doors is incredible!!!

i've only a little question: where i can find the tool that you use for "catch" the curves?

i've see it in your post number 12 on your topic...

i need one :D

stefano
;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Thanks for the comments!

@stef600rr
I believe its called a "curve ruler" in english. I found one in a design/paint shop here in Sweden.
If it might help I did find two different manifacturers of it called "Linex" and the other "KOH-I-NOOR"
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
For the subwoofers I ideally wanted stealthboxes on both sides since I find just a box to simple, boring and kills luggagespace.
There are a few reasons why I didnt go with stealthboxes;
1. I didnt have any experience in fiberglassing prior to this
2. This meant I would need to try and get a matching carpet for the sidepanels, which is impossible and I cannot live with missmatching colors like that. Recarpeting all of it to alcantara was also on the optionslist for a moment but
I couldnt justify the costs and work.
3. I knew my deadline was already shot out of the window, this would take alot more time to get it the way I wanted.

In an effort to save some of the space I started making drawings in AutoCAD to find the best angle for the box to keep enough air behind the sub while still making it as shallow as possible. It could also not be taller than what was allowed for me to keep my luggage cover to fit over the top.




When I found the best compromise between the two, I got drawings made for all the pieces I needed. Since I didnt have good enough tools to make completely straight cuts I used the AutoCAD drawings to program a milling machine which cut
the pieces out for me for a perfect fit.




Since I didnt want it to be just a boring flatbaffle box, I decided to get some curves for the subs. Started with cutting out some rings, one to raise the sub abit and one to surround the edge of it.






Then I cut out a portion of the sides of the baffle so I could have a groove to staple fleece onto. Rings were glued on and then I started assembling some of it starting with the sides and bottom.










I wanted the box to have a snug fit in the trunk, but since the HX250 only wants 18,13 litres I had to make walls to allow for only that volume. I also added a few more for stability and to not leave empty space between them which "might've"
created echo or dissonance in some way. Probably not necissary at all with theese "mid-end" subs but easy way to let me have a piece of mind.
T-nuts for mounting and used PL400 around all edges to ensure it was airtight.
In addition I filled the remaning spaces with expanding foam.





 
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