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My question is what are some good component speakers to run for Front/Rear stage? Do I need to run an EQ? If so what? rockford fosgate 3sixty.3? Please feel free to ask questions as I’m sure I’m missing something. I’ve installed my own systems in the past but it’s been years so be easy on me..

Heres what i have so far.

Alpine ICS-X7HD Head unit to use with my Andriod phone
ALPINE® HCE-C115 Rear View Camera
PAC TR-7 TR7 Video Lockout Bypass
Metra Axxess ASWC-1 UNIVERSAL STEERING WHEEL CONTROL
SUNDOWN AUDIO SAX-125.4 AMP Front/Rear Stage
SUNDOWN AUDIO SAZ-3500D V2 Sub amp
(4) SUNDOWN AUDIO SA-8 V2 D2 Wired to 1 ohm in a custom under the seat box (not sure what im going to tune it to yet)
 

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I have a 2011 Silverado 1500. I use a RF 360.3. Mounting a two-way component system in the stock locations and running passive (door/midrange; A-pillar/tweeter) may leave you with an unfortunate gap in the vocal range where voices sound muted. This happened to me with JBL MS-62c and Focal Access 165A1 components. Additionally, rear door speakers significantly negatively affect your ability to accomplish a forward, center stage, as the door speakers are actually mounted (especially once you seal up the door) in a sort of enclosure within that door). They'll create a lot of midbass when the door is sealed so, if anything, only throw in midbass (no tweeter) speakers, IMO.

I do not think, though, that you NEED to have a processor to start out with. If you want to get one, most of them fit perfectly under the passenger seat (if it is not powered) and you can screw it into the rear vent that's under there. If you are crafty, I'd go with a 3-way setup putting the midrange and tweeter in the a-pillar and the midbass in a sealed door. I have a 3-way and I have not had vocal issues since - but my speakers are in the kick panels right now so my stage is sometimes not very high and it's a tall cabin to fill so I think A-pillars would sound good. I've heard two Dodge Ram's with active three ways and the A-pillar speakers were crossfiring off axis and they sounded great. Probably will sound similar in Silverados.

You will need A LOT of Dynamat for these large doors and, to seal the door, you will need to modify your door card (taking out or shaving down a plastic thing that goes into one of the holes in the door) and some very hard plastic or sheet metal to screw or glue in to create a hard surface to seal against with Dynamat (I use Stinger Roadkill). I also recommend a decoupling layer (I used anti-fatigue mats purchased from a Big Lots) between the door card and the door metal because our big door cards (at least mine) had a tenancy to rattle. I use a back wave dissipation thingy from Dynamat in my door behind the door speaker. I think Cadence makes them, too. I don't know if it made any difference but I do know that I barely hear a 160 watt-powered CDT M6+ midbass outside of the car with that and the Dynamat installed.

Mounting most tweeters in the stock location will require you to shave plastic from the stock tweeter mount (the grill itself) so you can put the grill back on and then you'll want to get craft about locking in the tweeter to the a-pillar itself as it is curved. I pressure fitted a 1" tweeter in there and superglued it. Now I can't get it out! :) What I've done in a another Silverado is angle the tweeter toward the driver behind the a-pillar using some metal similar to plumber's tape (only harder to bend... don't know what it's officially called). The stock tweeter direction faces toward the windshield which, for me having metal tweeters, caused a lot of harshness that I did not experience doing this in the other Silverado. I did decide, in that case, to modify the stock tweeter grill by cutting out the center of it and then wrapping it in two layers of grill cloth so that the plastic tweeter grill wasn't getting in the way of the sound waves. I have no idea if that made any positive effect but it looked pretty good. I have no pictures.

Also, the stock door speaker grills are like 100 feet from the speaker itself if you use aftermarket brackets. I recommend (1) carving out the stock front speaker and (2) installing your new speaker into the stock speaker mount. This ensures you get a nice hard mounting surface that fits perfectly. Aftermarket speaker adapters are often flimsy plastic and I do not like to put MDF in doors, even covered in layers of bed liner.

Installing rear speakers is harder if you have an extended cab... the OEM speaker looks more like it was intended to be a 6x9 plate . You could actually put a 6x9 in the rear door of an extended cab. Couldn't tell you for a Crew Cab... never done rears in one.

Ported boxes in truck cabs, in my limited experience, have the tendency to be "too mushy" and be loud but not very tight again a downfiring sealed box also sounds the same unless it's built right with a slot in the front of the woofer toward the front of the vehicle vs. a slot off to the side (if any at all). ProBox makes an amazing subwoofer box for Silverados and perhaps they'd make you an 8" box if you're feeling lazy. You will probably also want to pull down your roof liner and Dyanmat the roof... if you've ever been through a car wash in your truck you know how the roof is basically a tin can and after Dyanmating up there bass response was A LOT better and it doesn't sound like an all out war when I go through a car wash now. Which is nice.

Oh... and my pseudo-suede dash mat made an actual difference in finding center stage. And I noticed the harshness I was hearing from the stock tweeter locations reduce. That could be just my brain justifying the cost but I did get the dashmat for like $20 so doubtful. Plus it helps me fit in in Georgia... gotta have something redneck on my truck.
 

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I have a 2011 Silverado 1500. I use a RF 360.3. Mounting a two-way component system in the stock locations and running passive (door/midrange; A-pillar/tweeter) may leave you with an unfortunate gap in the vocal range where voices sound muted. This happened to me with JBL MS-62c and Focal Access 165A1 components. Additionally, rear door speakers significantly negatively affect your ability to accomplish a forward, center stage, as the door speakers are actually mounted (especially once you seal up the door) in a sort of enclosure within that door). They'll create a lot of midbass when the door is sealed so, if anything, only throw in midbass (no tweeter) speakers, IMO.

I do not think, though, that you NEED to have a processor to start out with. If you want to get one, most of them fit perfectly under the passenger seat (if it is not powered) and you can screw it into the rear vent that's under there. If you are crafty, I'd go with a 3-way setup putting the midrange and tweeter in the a-pillar and the midbass in a sealed door. I have a 3-way and I have not had vocal issues since - but my speakers are in the kick panels right now so my stage is sometimes not very high and it's a tall cabin to fill so I think A-pillars would sound good. I've heard two Dodge Ram's with active three ways and the A-pillar speakers were crossfiring off axis and they sounded great. Probably will sound similar in Silverados.

You will need A LOT of Dynamat for these large doors and, to seal the door, you will need to modify your door card (taking out or shaving down a plastic thing that goes into one of the holes in the door) and some very hard plastic or sheet metal to screw or glue in to create a hard surface to seal against with Dynamat (I use Stinger Roadkill). I also recommend a decoupling layer (I used anti-fatigue mats purchased from a Big Lots) between the door card and the door metal because our big door cards (at least mine) had a tenancy to rattle. I use a back wave dissipation thingy from Dynamat in my door behind the door speaker. I think Cadence makes them, too. I don't know if it made any difference but I do know that I barely hear a 160 watt-powered CDT M6+ midbass outside of the car with that and the Dynamat installed.

Mounting most tweeters in the stock location will require you to shave plastic from the stock tweeter mount (the grill itself) so you can put the grill back on and then you'll want to get craft about locking in the tweeter to the a-pillar itself as it is curved. I pressure fitted a 1" tweeter in there and superglued it. Now I can't get it out! :) What I've done in a another Silverado is angle the tweeter toward the driver behind the a-pillar using some metal similar to plumber's tape (only harder to bend... don't know what it's officially called). The stock tweeter direction faces toward the windshield which, for me having metal tweeters, caused a lot of harshness that I did not experience doing this in the other Silverado. I did decide, in that case, to modify the stock tweeter grill by cutting out the center of it and then wrapping it in two layers of grill cloth so that the plastic tweeter grill wasn't getting in the way of the sound waves. I have no idea if that made any positive effect but it looked pretty good. I have no pictures.

Also, the stock door speaker grills are like 100 feet from the speaker itself if you use aftermarket brackets. I recommend (1) carving out the stock front speaker and (2) installing your new speaker into the stock speaker mount. This ensures you get a nice hard mounting surface that fits perfectly. Aftermarket speaker adapters are often flimsy plastic and I do not like to put MDF in doors, even covered in layers of bed liner.

Installing rear speakers is harder if you have an extended cab... the OEM speaker looks more like it was intended to be a 6x9 plate . You could actually put a 6x9 in the rear door of an extended cab. Couldn't tell you for a Crew Cab... never done rears in one.

Ported boxes in truck cabs, in my limited experience, have the tendency to be "too mushy" and be loud but not very tight again a downfiring sealed box also sounds the same unless it's built right with a slot in the front of the woofer toward the front of the vehicle vs. a slot off to the side (if any at all). ProBox makes an amazing subwoofer box for Silverados and perhaps they'd make you an 8" box if you're feeling lazy. You will probably also want to pull down your roof liner and Dyanmat the roof... if you've ever been through a car wash in your truck you know how the roof is basically a tin can and after Dyanmating up there bass response was A LOT better and it doesn't sound like an all out war when I go through a car wash now. Which is nice.

Oh... and my pseudo-suede dash mat made an actual difference in finding center stage. And I noticed the harshness I was hearing from the stock tweeter locations reduce. That could be just my brain justifying the cost but I did get the dashmat for like $20 so doubtful. Plus it helps me fit in in Georgia... gotta have something redneck on my truck.
THIS IS SOME OF IF NOT THE BEST ADVICE YOU ARE GOING TO GET.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I have a 2011 Silverado 1500. I use a RF 360.3. Mounting a two-way component system in the stock locations and running passive (door/midrange; A-pillar/tweeter) may leave you with an unfortunate gap in the vocal range where voices sound muted. This happened to me with JBL MS-62c and Focal Access 165A1 components. Additionally, rear door speakers significantly negatively affect your ability to accomplish a forward, center stage, as the door speakers are actually mounted (especially once you seal up the door) in a sort of enclosure within that door). They'll create a lot of midbass when the door is sealed so, if anything, only throw in midbass (no tweeter) speakers, IMO.

I do not think, though, that you NEED to have a processor to start out with. If you want to get one, most of them fit perfectly under the passenger seat (if it is not powered) and you can screw it into the rear vent that's under there. If you are crafty, I'd go with a 3-way setup putting the midrange and tweeter in the a-pillar and the midbass in a sealed door. I have a 3-way and I have not had vocal issues since - but my speakers are in the kick panels right now so my stage is sometimes not very high and it's a tall cabin to fill so I think A-pillars would sound good. I've heard two Dodge Ram's with active three ways and the A-pillar speakers were crossfiring off axis and they sounded great. Probably will sound similar in Silverados.

You will need A LOT of Dynamat for these large doors and, to seal the door, you will need to modify your door card (taking out or shaving down a plastic thing that goes into one of the holes in the door) and some very hard plastic or sheet metal to screw or glue in to create a hard surface to seal against with Dynamat (I use Stinger Roadkill). I also recommend a decoupling layer (I used anti-fatigue mats purchased from a Big Lots) between the door card and the door metal because our big door cards (at least mine) had a tenancy to rattle. I use a back wave dissipation thingy from Dynamat in my door behind the door speaker. I think Cadence makes them, too. I don't know if it made any difference but I do know that I barely hear a 160 watt-powered CDT M6+ midbass outside of the car with that and the Dynamat installed.

Mounting most tweeters in the stock location will require you to shave plastic from the stock tweeter mount (the grill itself) so you can put the grill back on and then you'll want to get craft about locking in the tweeter to the a-pillar itself as it is curved. I pressure fitted a 1" tweeter in there and superglued it. Now I can't get it out! :) What I've done in a another Silverado is angle the tweeter toward the driver behind the a-pillar using some metal similar to plumber's tape (only harder to bend... don't know what it's officially called). The stock tweeter direction faces toward the windshield which, for me having metal tweeters, caused a lot of harshness that I did not experience doing this in the other Silverado. I did decide, in that case, to modify the stock tweeter grill by cutting out the center of it and then wrapping it in two layers of grill cloth so that the plastic tweeter grill wasn't getting in the way of the sound waves. I have no idea if that made any positive effect but it looked pretty good. I have no pictures.

Also, the stock door speaker grills are like 100 feet from the speaker itself if you use aftermarket brackets. I recommend (1) carving out the stock front speaker and (2) installing your new speaker into the stock speaker mount. This ensures you get a nice hard mounting surface that fits perfectly. Aftermarket speaker adapters are often flimsy plastic and I do not like to put MDF in doors, even covered in layers of bed liner.

Installing rear speakers is harder if you have an extended cab... the OEM speaker looks more like it was intended to be a 6x9 plate . You could actually put a 6x9 in the rear door of an extended cab. Couldn't tell you for a Crew Cab... never done rears in one.

Ported boxes in truck cabs, in my limited experience, have the tendency to be "too mushy" and be loud but not very tight again a downfiring sealed box also sounds the same unless it's built right with a slot in the front of the woofer toward the front of the vehicle vs. a slot off to the side (if any at all). ProBox makes an amazing subwoofer box for Silverados and perhaps they'd make you an 8" box if you're feeling lazy. You will probably also want to pull down your roof liner and Dyanmat the roof... if you've ever been through a car wash in your truck you know how the roof is basically a tin can and after Dyanmating up there bass response was A LOT better and it doesn't sound like an all out war when I go through a car wash now. Which is nice.

Oh... and my pseudo-suede dash mat made an actual difference in finding center stage. And I noticed the harshness I was hearing from the stock tweeter locations reduce. That could be just my brain justifying the cost but I did get the dashmat for like $20 so doubtful. Plus it helps me fit in in Georgia... gotta have something redneck on my truck.
Thanx Sirboom very detailed wasnt expecting that much detail from one person so again Thank you! Ill have to print this out and digest it to make sence of all of it.

I was thinking of going with CDT speakers they make a set that has a 6.5", 4" and tweeter for front. Mount the 6.5 in the stock location and the 4" and tweeter in A pillar. Thoughts? Guess ill look into 6x9 for the rear or 6.5 in stock location.
 

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A 4" gets a little big for our A-pillars... I thought about it myself. But that's just my opinion. The goal though is to get the least amount of vocal range coming from the door speaker because everything that comes out of that door is muted in that range. It has to do with how far the speaker is away from the grill and I think the stock grill is very restrictive plus the speaker is 100 feet away from you. Whomever designed the Silverado speaker setup wasn't an audiophile... let's put it that way. Dodge Ram has the best truck stock speaker setup I've dealt with. But Dodge Rams (or Rams) look fugly.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
What about moving the door speakers down to the kick panel area? Say using the Q logic molded pcs? That way they fire up at you. Or would I be better off moving them closer to the grill in stock location and put cloth over the speaker and remove the plastic? I figure I will get more mid bass From door if I seal it up better then the aftermarket kick panel?
 

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I have the Q-logic pods if you want to buy them. ;) I've deadened them with Stinger Roadkill and have already (albeit jaggedly) cut the holes. The tweeter hole is cut larger than a normal tweeter (a 1.25" Alpine tweeter vs. your regular 1" tweeter) but your flush mount ring will probably cover the hole... otherwise you can get some thin plastic and make a baffle to cover the hole. I'll let them go for a steal.

If you buy new Q-Logic kick panels, know this. (1) They don't fit amazingly... well, they fit well enough but they don't clip into the stock clip locations (which is f'ing stupid) and instead you're expected to drill a screw hole into the metal. I never did... I just pressure fitted them in and used the kick panel thing to hold them up... never had a problem. People always ask me if I made them custom because they do look pretty good and they don't get in the way except for maybe you might hit the mid's speaker grill with the parking brake. Doesn't affect the speaker itself but you'll end up with a dent if you push the parking brake down hard, say, when you're loading a car trailer or something.

All that said... you will have a hard time getting much midbass from these because they are open in the back and not thick and hard like wood. Adding a bunch of Stinger Roadkill helped a bunch but I got more midbass from the same speaker in a sealed door than I did from the kick panel. They're great for midrange and highs, though.

What I did was do an active 3-way with the midbass in the door, midrange 6.5" (you can get 5.25" Q-Logics, too), and a 1.25" tweeter. That worked really well and I was able to give the midbass very limited duty. It took me a while to successfully get a center stage that was raised but I ended up getting one that sounds as if it's coming from the defroster vent and across the windshield for the rest of the band. Not a competition winner grade center stage... not "high" like coming from outside of the windshield vertically but close enough for me to be satisfied given how much I've tried. That was using a RF 360.3 though and I also replicated pretty closely using just my Alpine HU with time alignment, albeit not as locked down.

So here's my vote, if you want to do kicks. Get the Q-logics or make your own. Deaden the Q-logics with like 3 layers of sound deadening and then spray over that with GOOD bedliner/undercoating (not the think cheap stuff). Let it dry before putting it in the car and you will need to sand off areas to make sure you get it to fit with all that stuff put on the back of them, but that's grillin'... Get your 2-way component set. Put those in there and use the passive crossover on them. Set your amp to only send them, say, 150 hz and above. Then put in some midbasses in the doors. There are some Audible Physics Arian 6.5" midbasses that are EXCELLENT for sale here on this forum. Have those handling, say, 63-80hz to 150 hz... very limited range.

If you want back speakers, you can power them off of the head unit. Get EFFICIENT speakers (90db+) and don't spring for the highest end ones because they won't be designed to run well off of 14-watts.

For hooking everything up, you can do one of two things, IMO. (1) you can power the entire front stage off of the "front" channel of the amp, which would run at 2-ohms (assuming both the midbass and component set are each 4-ohms). Then you can run your rear speakers off the rear channel if you want to amplify them (always a plus). Downside here is you won't have independent amplifier crossover control over the midbass vs. the component set but the midbass and component set eminating the same frequencies may actually sound better and help with vocal performance... or maybe not. Gonna have to experiment. The midbass will roll off probably around 4-5,000 hz on its own anyway, around-ish right where your tweeter will start to pickup. (2) Or you can again power the rear speakers off of the head unit and power the midbass off of the rear channel of your amp, the component set off of the front channel of your amp. But, in order to use T/A built into your head unit (if you have it) somewhat successfully, you'll want to NOT use the rear RCA output and instead split the front RCA output into the Front and Rear input of the amplifier (or if your amp has an A-A/B switch just set it to A... A being it takes input from the front channel rca inputs and distributes to both the front and rear... basically an internal cable splitter). Many 4-channels have that.

What do you think? You'll suffer a bit with a harder to achieve raised sound stage but then you don't have to fight the stock tweeter locations and everything is on axis for less effort than making custom A-pillars. You can do A-pillars later, if you wanted, when you get a processor, of course ditching the rear speakers because you won't have enough channels. :)
 

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Sounds like an awesome set up sirboom. I know what you mean with the vocals though. I have a 2 way up front with tweets in the stock locations and my vocals sound far away sometimes. Been trying to fix that for awhile now. What if you did the kicks but left the tweets in the A pillars? Or said screw the pillars and put them in the sail panels?
 

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You can put the tweeters up top if you want. That's a good idea. I thought of doing that but never did because then I'd have kick panels with an empty hole in them and I didn't want to make my own kick panels because, well, I was lazy. You will have a kick panel with a tweeter location but no tweeter, which maybe you can put some trick LED lights in that spot or, I don't know, some sort of gauge or a smiley face sticker... all up to you, man. :) The Q-Logics don't come pre-drilled for the tweeter hole so no tweeter there wouldn't look all that bad. Plus the tweeter in these kick panels is in a mildly risky location if you have muddy boots on that day...
 

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Discussion Starter #12
So you think running a speaker in the door 6.5 another 6.5 in the kick panel with a tweeter? none in the A-pilar? All this on front channel and 6.5 in the rear off rear channel of my 4 channel amp will be my best bet?
 

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Thanx Sirboom very detailed wasnt expecting that much detail from one person so again Thank you! Ill have to print this out and digest it to make sence of all of it.

I was thinking of going with CDT speakers they make a set that has a 6.5", 4" and tweeter for front. Mount the 6.5 in the stock location and the 4" and tweeter in A pillar. Thoughts? Guess ill look into 6x9 for the rear or 6.5 in stock location.
A-pillars have their benefits, but I usually advise people against that placement for mids and tweeters. You shrink stage width and end up in a losing battle against reflected sound. With CDT speakers custom spec'd components are possible, and that's something I do for people. They have 2" and 3" mids as well. The 2" can be popped into a door panel with little effort if space is tight.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
trumpet do you think I should stick with sirboom suggestion and place a 6.5 in door, get or make kick panels and another 6.5 and tweeter there?
 

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If you're going to make kick panels, you can make a kick panel for a midbass and put the midrange and tweeter in the a-pillar or even french them into the dash. Speakers fired off of the windshield in our trucks sounded good (in my testing... never actually installed, though). My suggestion is a great place to start and is low risk other than cost.
 
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