DiyMobileAudio.com Car Stereo Forum banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is my car that I upgraded over a period of 2 years. It's rather lengthy so I think I'll break it up into several posts by location. I have all the details in my google sheets online as well: B9 S4 B&O speaker data I'm sure you'll be totally unsurprised by how bad the sound quality was. I kept thinking I could just fix the one driver that was messing things up. But every time I put a good driver in, the weakness of the remaining drivers only became that much more obvious.

First up, subwoofer.

My car had a slim line free air 10" subwoofer located on the rear deck between the metal and the fabric. The factory sub was a DVC 8 ohm but I decided to push my luck with a 4 ohm replacement since I heard that some other cars use the same amp with 4 ohm subs from the factory. Indeed this appears to be safe as I've driven the sub to it's mechanical limits and the amp is barely warm to the touch. I also know that installing a 2 ohm sub will send the amp into protection mode.

Step 1:
Use a trim tool to pry out the D Pillar covers starting on the front edge. It has a long fabric tail in the very bottom rear by the glass that will be the last part to come out. Try not to rip it off. Both sides need to come out.

Hood Automotive design Automotive tire Motor vehicle Vehicle


Step 2:
Use a trim tool to pry up the speaker grilles on the rear deck starting with the front edge and then lifting up at the front edge. Unplug the surround sound speakers and set the grilles aside.

Hood Automotive design Automotive exterior Personal luxury car Vehicle door


Step 3:
Unscrew the four T25 Torx screws that fasten the deck fabric to the B&O subwoofer. If you don't have a right angle adapter for your screwdriver pause here, go to the hardware store and buy one. You'll need it again later.

Hood Motor vehicle Automotive lighting Automotive tire Vehicle


Step 4:
Fold down the rear seats. The rear deck fabric bends down behind the seats. Put your fingers behind the fabric but in front of the metal and lift up. There are a row of snaps that hold it down. Just lift up and they will unsnap with moderate effort. Set the fabric aside in a clean place. Be careful the edges are sharp and they will cut you. Go ahead ask me how I know that.

Vehicle Car Hood Motor vehicle Automotive exterior


Step 5:
Unscrew the factory sub which is held in by three T25 Torx screws. Did you get that right angle adapter yet? Unplug the power wire and lift the subwoofer out of the car. Place it next to your new sub and admire how sad it looks next to your new hotness.

Wheel Tire Automotive tire Automotive lighting Tread


Step 6:
Apply your favorite sound dampening material to the metal around the subwoofer. The frame is actually pretty well damped already but there are a couple areas that can use it. I also closed up the large rectangular hole next to the sub to help isolate the trunk cavity from the interior cavity for better sound. You'll also need to unclip one wire that runs in front of the old sub so you can move it out of the way for the new sub.

Hood Automotive tire Motor vehicle Car Vehicle


Step 7: Hopefully you located and drilled all the holes in the mounting spacer by now. Fit the spacer onto the woofer and then drop the woofer into place and find the best alignment. Carefully drill one mounting hole through the rear deck. From here you can just do all of them if you are careful not to damage the woofer, otherwise, remove the subwoofer, put one screw in that hole and then use the other holes in the spacer ring to locate the remaining holes. Even with the right angle adapter I was only able to get into the front 6 holes. Drop the woofer back in and screw in sheet metal screws appropriate for the holes you drilled.

Automotive tire Motor vehicle Automotive lighting Hood Tread


Step 8:
Connect the new sub to the factory wiring harness. I need to get back in there and write down the wiring order, but the long answer is, the inner two wires on the plug are Coil A and the outer two wires on the plug are Coil B. If you don't want to cut the harness you can sand down some 3mm spade lugs and just stuff them in to the plug and secure it with some hot glue. If one coil is wired backwards, the woofer won't move at all because they are pushing against each other. If the woofer plays but the bass is very weak between 60-90hz, then it's wired out of phase to the rest of the car. Reverse the polarity of BOTH coils. If you are using your own amp, you can connect it now.

Light Green Camera accessory Audio equipment Cable


Step 9:
Put everything back in the reverse order of above. Make sure that you get all the snaps on the rear deck secured back down or it'll rattle. Go into the trunk with a file and blunt the points of the screws that are holding the new woofer. If you are using a different woofer or spacer make sure you check that there is space between the woofer surround and the fabric before snapping the grill back down. I was able to fit a finger between them which is plenty.

Tire Wheel Hand Bicycle tire Automotive tire

Hood Automotive tire Motor vehicle Automotive design Bumper


To be continued...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Step 10:
I decided to completely paste over the entire rear deck with sound damping material to cover all the huge holes in the sheet metal and seal off the trunk from the cabin better. 3 of those huge holes were right in front of the woofer so those were a priority. I already had dynamat on the top side but didn't make much effort to seal it up. Anyway, it helped tighten the bass a bit more, and helped it play those super deep deep notes a little better. It was worth the effort and took me about 20 minutes to complete since I didn't really need to take anything apart. This particular subwoofer is intended for infinite baffle and it's ideal enclosure size comes out to something ridiculous like 31 cubic feet so this actually worked out really well.

Automotive lighting Hood Automotive tire Motor vehicle Automotive parking light


Automotive tire Tire Motor vehicle Wheel Tread


Aggressively matting under the back seat cut way back on the exhaust note and helped the car's weak midbass a lot.

Automotive tire Motor vehicle Automotive lighting Hood Bumper
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Next up: The rear doors

The rear door has a 1" tweeter and a standard 6" woofer. The location could accept 5-6.5" drivers and it uses the standard bracket from Metra and others. Real door woofer rolls off below 160hz which is disappointing. Originally I put the famous $7 woofer from parts express here and it was OK, but recently I replaced it with the Dayton GF180 which I'm a LOT happier with. This woofer punches way above it's weight class for sure. I wouldn't say it has amazing bass in a car door but as a mid bass it kicks butt. The impedance is a little wonky above 2K and it breaks up very hard above 5K. I ran some simulations and found it was a very good match with the Dayton ND25 tweeter if I put an inductor on the woofer for 4K (0.15uH) and a cap on the tweeter for 5K (8uf). This is higher crossover than Dayton recommends but I found it blends very well in the car door. I'm just going to skip over the time with the first woofer since it's not in the car anymore. I only mention it for historical completeness.

Dayton GF180 vs PE $7

Brown Product Public address system Sound box Output device


Sorry I didn't photograph the door panel removal process as well as the subwoofer

Step 1
Use a trim tool to pop off the cosmetic trim in the side of the door (on my car, it's the carbon fiber piece but some are aluminum, plastic, or wood). It comes up but not out. Once it's loose slide it forward and then it'll come out.

Step 2:
Unscrew the 2 torx screws that were under the trim piece

Step 3:
Use a trim tool to pop the door card loose. Start at the bottom where there is a little gap and then work your way up both sides to the top. The top edge curls over and sits on top of the metal and has no snaps.

Step 4:
Lift up on the door card until it slides over the metal. Tilt it back and carefully unclip the door handle cable and all of the wiring harnesses. Set the door card someplace safe where it won't get scratched.

Step 5:
Remove the woofer and unplug it's cable.

Step 6:
Assemble the new woofer into it's adapter bracket. If you bought a wiring harness adapter, connect it too. Some woofers work best with a filter to limit high frequencies. I put mine inside the plastic ring adapter and glued it down with hot glue.

Automotive tire Automotive lighting Motor vehicle Camera lens Synthetic rubber


I don't like cutting factory plugs but I didn't get any harness adapters so I just trimmed a spade terminal to fit in there. It's a tight fit and has never wiggled loose. Pin 1 is negative.

Automotive tire Hood Light Automotive lighting Vehicle


Step 7:
Remove the factory tweeter from it's bracket on the inside of the door card by turning it. For simplicity I decided it was best to use the factory mounting bracket so I bought a bare element version of the Dayton ND25. I need to say this isn't the finest tweeter ever made, but it's a very solid performer. Excellent details, non fatiguing, and cuts road noise like a knife. Just don't cross it below 4K.

Motor vehicle Hood Automotive design Circuit component Engineering


Step 8:
Using a carbide cutter in a dremel tool, I carefully cut the plastic around the magnet on the factory tweeter and the element fell out of the frame. The ND25 was a perfect fit so I dropped it in and secured with hot glue. I added an 8uF cap inline and then wired to the factory plug with a harness adapter I got in ali express..

Automotive tire Electric blue Font Personal protective equipment Soil


Circuit component Hardware programmer Computer hardware Electrical wiring Computer cooling


Sleeve Automotive tire Camera lens Wood Font


Step 9:
Install the new tweeter into the factory location and plug it back into the harness cable in the door card.

Motor vehicle Automotive tire Automotive design Office equipment Font

Automotive tire Motor vehicle Automotive design Rim Automotive exterior


Step 10:
Put the door back together following the steps in reverse.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Next up, the front door woofer and midrange.

These two drivers garnered especial hatred as being among the worst in the car. The midrange is a 4.5" paper cone mounted in a VERY slim space between the metal and plastic. The factory mid sounds thin and can be very harsh with female vocals. It's also muddy and loses details. The woofer however just boggles my mind on how catastrophically terrible it is. The door location is large enough to swallow up a decent sized 8" woofer and of course a 6.5" would have been a great choice as well. But no the folks at B&O decided they should use a 4"X6" 8 ohm 100W rectangular woofer firing towards the back of the car into a horn that turns the sound 90 degrees towards the interior. The horn resonates around 160hz for a fingernails on the chalkboard effect. They drive the woofer all the way down to 43hz even though it's effectively dead at 65hz. Also the giant grill in front of the speaker is almost completely blocked except for a 4x6 opening above the horn. I tried to imagine how the process must've gone at B&O but I can only think of a certain meme regarding a grizzly bear and his enthusiasm for white powdery substances. On the plus side, this nonsense left stupendous depth clearances available.

Seriously, who thought this was a good idea?


Automotive tire Tread Tire Automotive design Rim


Automotive tire Automotive lighting Light Motor vehicle Yellow


Automotive tire Audio equipment Automotive design Motor vehicle Cameras & optics


The steps for taking the front doors apart is the same as the rear doors so no need to type all that out again.

Step 1:
At the time I did this there weren't any adapter rings available. I believe there is only one now and it's from basser.pl and made of MDF. So I decided to make my own brackets from the horn assembly. It has the connections, and the screw holes, and it's made of a super strong glass filled plastic. Using a dremel cut off disk I gutted the horn and mounts leaving only the ring.

Tire Automotive tire Wheel Tread Rim


Not wanting to change the impedance left me with only a few choices for woofers. I wanted something with a low Fs that would be able to reach the 43hz that channel drives to and be high efficiency. I've heard of a few people putting 4 ohm woofers here and being OK since then though. I used the Aurum Cantus AC180F 7" woofer. Really the 6.5" version (AC165) would have been an easier fit and performed just fine but I was feeling ambitious. These are all fantastic woofers. I want to use them in other projects in the future.

Wood Automotive tire Output device Audio equipment Gas


Step 2
(Audio purists: don't read this step) I glued that nice woofer to the ring with loctite construction adhesive. Man that is strong stuff. I left it to cure a full 24 hours. It's been in the car for 2 years of "spirited" driving and hasn't shown the slightest hint of cracks or movement. When Jake told Elwood "This is glue, it's strong stuff" he must've been using loctite construction adhesive. Connect the terminals in the ring directly to the speaker. No adapters needed.

Step 3:
Bolt up the new woofer assembly to the car door and plug in the cable.

Tire Vehicle Automotive lighting Automotive tire Hood


Step 4:

I had to trim off one of the hooks on the grille because it hit the woofer. No great loss. It has plenty more, and even though this grill famously rattles, it always rattles on the back corner, not the top.

Automotive lighting Automotive tire Motor vehicle Camera lens Automotive design


Step 5
To fix the grille, I used the top roller of my belt sander to slowly grind away the plastic blocking the rest of the grille above the new woofer. When the plastic started melting I switched to the other grille. Back and forth, back and forth for a good 4 hours. What a pain.

Sky Cloud Plant Hood Grille


Step 6.

When it came to the midrange I could only find 2 choices. The Peerless GBS 4.5" aluminum dome midrange and a Faital Pro FE32. I felt the Faital Pro was too bright however the Peerless GBS is pretty awesome. Imagine midrange with tweeter like crispness and detail. If I were a violin teacher I could probably identify the brand of rosin the violinist was using through these speakers. Vocals are never harsh even when played loud and suddenly I could hear little details like echos from large rooms that were never there before. They drop like a bomb at 4.5k so no need to filter (the midrange and A pillar tweeter share a channel)

Automotive lighting Wood Bumper Audio equipment Gas


I placed some rope caulk around the edge of the midrange because the dome was too tall and hit the grill opening. I added some 1/4" spacers under the screws and tightened it down. This was actually pretty easy. The midrange uses the same harness as the tweeters.

Automotive tire Motor vehicle Automotive design Automotive exterior Alloy wheel


Step 7
Put the door back together, just like before
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Next up: The sub amp

But wait, didn't you say the factory amp was OK with a 4 ohm load? Yes it was fine, and just a teeny bit louder that before. BUT after replacing the front door woofers I had a new problem. Bass was very strong 50-90hz, but weak below 50hz. I spent a lot of time thinking about this and concluded the only real way to solve it was to put in an amp with it's own tone controls so I could set the sub crossover lower and give it a bass boost at 40hz and below. I bought a nice Pioneer GM-D8701 class D sub amp. This sounded simple but turned out to be WAY more complicated than it should have been. Buy an amp with speaker level inputs and hook it up right? LOL. no

TLDR: The Kicker KEY500.1 is the only amp that's plug and play with the Audi B&O amp with speaker level inputs.

Sadly Kicker wouldn't invent this amp for another year. :~( However because I bought the Kicker sub, their tech support bent over backwards to help me figure out the problem. Seriously. I can't say enough good about Kicker and their support. Pioneer basically told me to pound sand. They had me playing test tones and measuring voltages while in different configurations and trying out loads and connections. Eventually we figured out that the Audi sub output has the following characteristics that make it unfriendly to amps.

1. It has a 20.8V DC offset that goes out of range of most speaker level inputs. Some amps die from this.
2. The B&O amp does a resistance check on power on, and every 30 minutes or so while playing and if it measures less than 50 ohms it shuts down the sub amp output.
3. It checks BOTH outputs and if one fails it disables BOTH outputs.
4. The subwoofer channel is isolated from the chassis ground.

I also tried using an audiocontrol LC2i because someone in the audi club said it worked (it didn't). Audiocontrol told me that wasn't how the product was meant to be used either. Eventually I got it to work by adding some high power rated resistors in parallel with the speaker level inputs on the LC2i. Even then sometimes the amp would still shut down and eventually we figured out how to disable the feature with the VCDS software (OBD11 also has a fix). It's been solid ever since.

I can't find a photo of it wired up but I made a metal bracket for the amp that would sit under the spare tire and hold it firmly in place but still be removable and I didn't poke any holes in the bottom of my car that might rust out later.

Motor vehicle Automotive design Automotive exterior Trunk Automotive tire


Load resistors

Wood Circuit component Wood stain Wrist Passive circuit component
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Next Step: Surround speakers

I'm not sure why I didn't just disconnect these speakers like I did the 3D effect speakers. I kinda liked the rear fill they offered and I was drunk with my successes so far. You can control the volume of these with the MMI control but you can't disable them in the MMI (unlike 3D effect which you can and SHOULD). Because these are full range I decided to use the Faital Pro 4FE35 which is the cheaper version with the ferrite magnet. No complaints really but I had to turn the surround volume way down because they were so bright. I don't regret it and these were super easy to replace.

Car subwoofer Audio equipment Sound box Loudspeaker Output device


Step 1:
Pop off the two plastic grilles in the rear deck fabric just like we did way back in the beginning of the subwoofer. A trim tool works but so does finger nails.

Step 2. Swap the drivers using the factory screws. The holes are in the same place.

Automotive lighting Light Automotive tire Motor vehicle Audio equipment


Step 3:
The other 2 mounting ears won't fit allow the grilles to snap back down. You can either cut off the metal ears, or cut an opening in the fabric. I chose the fabric since it was pretty easy to do.

Plant Rectangle Font Grass Terrestrial plant


Step 4:

Put it all back together. Gravity does most of the work. Don't forget to plug them in using the tweeter/midrange harness.

Eye Dishware Automotive lighting Serveware Automotive tire


Grille Black Automotive tire Font Motor vehicle
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Next up: The center channel

I have to say that this improved the sound more than I expected it would. It's not a night and day sort of thing, but now the center sound stage buzzing and harshness disappears and it blends perfectly with the others. Details are crisper on strings and fast electronic music. It improves stereo imaging for both front seats but more so for the passenger. I used the Peerless GBS mid because that's the same mid I used in the front doors. If you've already replaced your door mids, you should use the same mid in your center for voice matching.

The Peerless mid is not easy to install here. I had to extensively sand down it's plastic frame and also dremel out a little of the pocket underneath. It is possible to get it in there without modifying the pocket, but only if you orient the connections towards the front and rear of the car before grinding down the ears. I had already ground off 2 ears by the time I figured this out and was too late to reverse course. The FaitalPro is easier to fit here. If you have the version of the car without the door midranges, then you should probably use the FaitalPro and replace the dash corner tweeters with the smaller FaitalPro full range speakers. Always use some poly fill behind FaitalPro drivers to tame their rear reflections.

The tweeter I used was the Dayton ND25 with no faceplate. It's too small to engage the factory hooks, so I glued it into the packing foam it came with, compressed the foam and stuffed it into the factory mount which looks ghetto as hell but holds it very securely. Replacing the tweeter had less of an effect as replacing the midrange. Very little sound comes out of the tweeter factory or otherwise. No filter caps required on this tweeter since it's a dedicated channel from the amp.

Lastly the wiring harnesses on Alibaba are not always wired with the same polarity so make sure you check them before you use them. The set I got had the polarity reversed. You can pull the pins out and swap them if this bugs you too much. The good news is, the center tweeter is the same polarity as the others and you can use those harnesses for both drivers in the center.

Step 0.5:
Order a new center grille because you are probably going to break yours taking it out.

Step 1
Go around the outer edge of the plastic frame and the soft dash material with a firm trim tool. Lift it up a few mm and no more. Move over a couple inches and lift again. Repeat until you've lifted the entire frame a few mm. Then go around again lifting a few more mm this time. pry pry pry pry pry pry pry pry. Get frustrated and lift a little more crack... plink... rattle rattle rattle

Flash photography Jaw Art Jacket Movie


Step 2:
Unscrew the factory mid and remove the tweeter.

Step 3:
Install the new replacement midrange and tweeter. Note this tweeter is on it's own amp channel and does not have a capacitor. The factory tweeter didn't have one either. Why is the center is two separate channels? Don't know.

Vehicle Automotive lighting Automotive tire Hood Motor vehicle


Step 4:
Many people have complained about an obnoxious rattle from the center channel grill. Mine started doing it after I put it back on. I noticed that these little metal clips are loose and buzz and rattle quite badly. I could hold the frame in my hands and tap on it's side and hear those clips rattle. I put a drop of silicone on the back side of each clip so it can't rattle.

Motor vehicle Automotive tire Wheel Vehicle Automotive design


Gratuitous Audi rings projection

Rectangle Asphalt Font Road surface Audio equipment


Step 5:
Carefully lower the grille back into position using slow even pressure. Don't slap this one down like every other panel so far.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Next up: Pillar tweeters

The A pillars each have two tweeters. The top tweeter is a 30mm dome sitting on top of the side impact airbag and it's only used for the 3D effect. The lower A pillar tweeter is the main and connected to the door midrange. I really wanted to move the active tweeter up to the upper location since I disabled 3D effect, however, the upper tweeter is held in a strange bracket that appears to break away and still be retained when the airbag deploys. Since I don't understand how that's all supposed to work, and I don't want to be murdered by a supersonic tweeter, I decided it would be best to just leave that one alone.

Automotive tire Automotive design Automotive exterior Rim Font


The lower factory tweeters are astonishingly terrible. They only play from 8.5K to 12.5K. How they managed to screw up a 1" silk dome tweeter so hard is a mystery to me. It even has ferrofluid. This isn't a crossover limit either. Anyway let get them out.

Step 1:
Remove the A pillar cover. This one is a bit tricky. You have to start at the top with a trim tool and pop them loose. They won't come out though.

Step 2:
Get a bright flashlight and peer down from the top through the loose opening which isn't easy or comfortable. You are looking for a rectangular metal box a few inches down from the top. I couldn't take any useful photos because of the small spaces but it's helpful to use a phone camera to see inside. There's a small hole in the top for a slotted screwdriver. Insert a screwdriver into this hole and push the metal box down about 1cm until it stops. Now you can pull off the top of the A pillar cover and unsnap the second snap near the bottom (no sliding cage nut this time, just pull). Don't try to remove the panel yet.

Step 3:
Remove the trim piece on the dash next to the A pillar cover. You have to open the door to get this out. It covers the fabric hooks in the bottom of the A pillar cover so you need to get it out. Once that's done you can slide the pillar cover forward past it's tabs then lift up. It's basically cardboard so go easy on it.

Step 4:
Remove the lower tweeter from it's mount and use a dremel cutter to cut around the magnet just like on the rear door.

Automotive tire Motor vehicle Automotive wheel system Rim Font


Step 5:
Once again the ND25 bare element tweeters are a perfect fit into these housings. Plop them in and hot glue around the edges to hold them in securely. There is a lot of room behind the tweeter so no worries on the heatsink or tweeters with back chambers. It's also below the airbag as well.

Step 6:
Install 8uF caps and connect to the harness adapters. The pictures show 10uF because that's how I originally did it but I raised the crossover point after listening to it for a few days.

Hood Automotive tire Vehicle Finger Motor vehicle


Reflex camera Automotive lighting Camera lens Automotive tire Digital camera


Step 7
This time installation isn't completely the reverse of the removal. Remember that sliding cage nut lock? Have a good look at it and how it works. You'll need to slide it back to the original position before you can put it back in. Once that's sorted it just pops back in. If you can't get the top to snap in, check the plastic alignment pin isn't bent and the cage nut is in the right place.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
So there it is. Every speaker replaced except for the four 3D effect speakers. These are hard to get to, make the system super bright, and the fake 3D effect causes warbling with music that has natural reverb. It's terrible and should be disabled, especially after replacing the tweeters and get the high frequency content back. Actually I'm running the treble at -2 so extra brightness isn't welcome at all.

How does it sound? Fantastic. I think this is the furthest I can go without getting the whole system, installing a Zen-V, a DSP, and a whole pile of amps. For me, it's not worth the trouble, expense, or giving up my spare tire for that last bit of perfection in a noisy car environment. Since I did all the work myself, I spent about $800 on the whole project. The system looks stock from the outside and I only gave up enough trunk space for a kicker CompC magnet. The sound is rich, full, and clear. It cuts the road noise and I can turn it up without hurting my ears.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
those mids are neat!

anyone who makes a blues brothers reference is good in my books!
Lol. That glue really is amazing stuff.

That mid works really well because the dome shape makes it disperse very evenly. Since you were sitting extremely off axis to the one by your seat but fairly on axis to the one on the other side that dispersion helps fill the cabin with high quality sound really well.
 

·
Registered
2003 Jetta Wagon
Joined
·
793 Posts
Lol. That glue really is amazing stuff.

That mid works really well because the dome shape makes it disperse very evenly. Since you were sitting extremely off axis to the one by your seat but fairly on axis to the one on the other side that dispersion helps fill the cabin with high quality sound really well.
It would also be a dream to package in a door card install that didnt allow for a mid originally, or even in a kick without having to build out
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
It would also be a dream to package in a door card install that didnt allow for a mid originally, or even in a kick without having to build out
I think that it has a lot of potential in that regard. It's so thin that you really don't need much space behind it. The dome protrudes forward however so you can't ignore that either. The sound really is good from the speaker and I like it a lot. If you put it into a proper enclosure it will actually play pretty deep too.

I kind of want to build a home project with one of them.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top