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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Overview

As I finalize the setup for my build, I’ve decided to document the whole thing as a 3-part series. This is just my process, but I hope some of you will find something in here that may help you along your own journey.

My goals for the system are as follows:

  • Understand and use what you have in front of you and keep things as simple and clean and stealth as possible
  • Use high-quality, mid-tier equipment that is (relatively) affordable, readily available and easy to get serviced or repaired
  • Don't tax the precious (sensitive) German-car electrical system, or damage my hearing
  • Achieve the most enjoyable music listening experience possible, through careful component selection, installation and tuning
  • Keep everything as close to factory as possible, no cutting unless absolutely necessary
  • And finally "...do something with these god-damn speakers that have just been sitting here collecting dust, before they get thrown out or given to Goodwill!"

I don't plan to compete, or impress anyone, but I am building the system to accurately reproduce all different types of music with a certain level of clarity, ease and authority, while still being pleasant and non-fatiguing to listen to. If other people enjoy it and it scores well, great!

Part 1 will cover the gear that I will be using and why. I will go over some of the things that are important to me personally and some system specific features that will make life a lot easier later on when we get to tuning.

Part 2 goes over the installation. If real estate is all about location, location, location, car audio is all about the installation. And I don’t just mean “Dude did you even deaden your doors?” or “Ferrules rule Bro!”, but understanding the environment of your car, the equipment that you’ve chosen and how to properly combine the two to achieve your goals (we should all have these!) within the constraints set by your time, finances, understanding and ability.

Part 3 is all about tuning. We’ve done our hours and hours (and hours) of research, selected the gear we like and what we think works best for us, we’ve put it all in the car to the best of our abilities (and budget) and now it’s time to make the necessary adjustments to achieve car audio nirvana! One of the most import tools for this is of course a DSP but we’ll save that for last, because God knows, we were all lost, deaf idiots before Helix came along and lifted the veil from over our ears and showed us the way. As powerful as it is as a tuning tool, it really just combines a lot of basic signal processing features into one convenient package (plus time delay and some signal wizardry) and we should know how those features impact the system as a whole, so when we do get to using a DSP, we have the necessary fundamentals down and are ready for some of the more advanced digital ‘trickery’. The most important tool of all though is of course our ears and i believe we should all know how to use them properly.

I am by no means an expert, but I have a fair idea of what I’m doing and how I’m going to achieve my goals. I’m also never afraid to ask questions or seek help, so if there’s anything you’d like to know, or have some suggestions, please send me a message. I probably won’t get too much into the technical details, this will act more as a general guideline, but feel free to research the different topics on your own because I doubt I can explain them well enough for anyone else to understand; I can barely grasp them myself.

I would love if you’d follow along and join me on this journey, because what fun is it if there are no knuckles to scrape or knobs to turn!

Also, feel free to message me any corrections. The last thing I want is for there to be any (more) misinformation being spread around this site.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
Part 1 - The Gear UNDER CONSTRUCTION

The first and most important piece of gear, the car; or truck, or van, or spaceship🤷‍♂️ (I saw a dope system on a bicycle once).
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I have a 2019 Mk7.5 VW Golf Alltrack SEL (station wagon) with the 'Premium' Fender Audio system. The car has a built in amplifier with 12 channels, about 485 Watts and 9 speakers. In the front there are tweeters in the a-pillars and dual 2 Ohm, 5-1/4" woofers in the lower part of the doors. The rear also has 5-1/4" woofers in the lower part of the doors but the tweeters are just above the armrest. And finally there's a single 6.5" dual 2 Ohm subwoofer under the floor of the trunk, in the spare tire. The factory head unit is a nice big touchscreen that does navigation, 3-band EQ plus sub, Apple CarPlay, parking sensor stuff, back-up camera etc.
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I'll start with the gear that I already had, and probably won't change, and then move on to the new stuff. The order is quite literally backwards.

Subwoofer - Dayton Audio 10" HO DVC
I've run this for a couple years in a 1.0 cu.ft sealed enclosure with good results. It is pretty efficient (90.5 dB @ 2.83V/1m) has dual 4 ohm voice coils, a metal cone and can handle a decent amount of power. I've been able to get it to reproduce music fairly accurately and getting it to blend with the midbass driver wasn't a problem. Being in the oversized box, I can get it to play fairly low but have to be careful not to bottom it out. The two problems I have with it are the impedance, and the low end output. Being dual 4 ohm coils, it can be wired for either 8 or 2 ohms. My old amp ran best at 2 ohms but I'd prefer to run this amp at 4 ohms. I'd also like for a little more low end extension and for it to be more effortless. Will probably look for a single 12" that will do well in about 1 - 1.2 cu.ft. and will use most of the 500 watts I can send to it.

Subwoofer Amp - JL Audio Slash 500/1v1
I've had this for about a year or so but never actually installed it in anything. I probably won't ever get rid of this amp, except for one of the newer versions. It can handle a wide range of input voltage and subwoofer impedance whiles delivering maximum power. I think it runs the best at 4 ohms, due to something having to do with the rail voltage. The best part of it though is it's crossover/equalizer section. It has variable phase, variable subsonic filter and a parametric EQ with adjustable Q. This will come in very handy when running a minimalist passive, analog system and trying to get things dialed in for optimal performance and efficiency. Another trick that it has up it's sleeve is that the bass knob controls the bass boost set by the parametric EQ, instead of the overall output. This will allow me to give the bottom end a little extra, depending on the music.

Rear-fill Speakers - Illusion Audio L6CX
Coincident, coaxial 2-way speaker with an external crossover. I'll probably never change these, except to the smaller version. Coincident means the tweeter and the woofer produce sound from the same plane by recessing the tweeter in the center of the woofer instead of having it stick out. This helps the drivers combine more coherently and reduces any kid of phase/timing issues since both are aligned. It should behave more like a point source are require little digital tuning. The crossover has a clever way of attenuating the tweeter output and can give up to 6dBs or reduction, in 1dB increments, another key feature when running a passive, analog system.
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Front Stage Speakers - Morel Virtus 603 or Illusion Audio L6
I’ve had the Morels for about 7 or 8 years now and they are my first ‘real’ set of car audio speakers. Even though they aren’t the top tier offering from Morel (not even close) they were still a considerable investment and offered a good balance between performance and value while capturing the well know Morel sound signature. The tweeter is a 1-1/8” coated silk dome with an Fs of 1,150hz. The midrange is 3-1/2” in a fairly compact package and is also a silk dome. The woofer is a paper composite 6-1/2” with neo magnet and decent power handling that doesn’t require too much mounting depth. All materials that I like the sound of and features that I thought would make for the perfect active 3-way set. I was really excited to install them in this car (still am) the only problem I’m having is coming up with an affordable solution to mounting the midrange that isn’t too obtrusive. I was considering mounting the midrange either in front of the little triangle window behind the tweeter, or lower down in the door the woofer where the cup holder is.

I'd prefer to keep the car looking as stock as possible so I ordered a pod for the midrange to mount it lower down in the door. They stick out quite a bit but they would allow me to keep them far from both listeners and aim them properly so I still might try it. My other concern with the Virtus 603 was that if did run the whole system passive, would I have enough level adjustment between the 3 speakers. The tweeter has +2, 0 and -2dB but nothing for the mid. Also, the woofer doesn’t seem to breathe well due to the design of the basket/rear vent and might struggle to provide enough bass up front. That’s where the Illusion L6s came in.

The L6CX point sources were kind of a gift and a curse because they sounded so good when I tried them, could play lower than the Morels, offered decent power handling and were really flexible for a passive install. Having these in the rear kind of forced me to put the L6 in the front. If I could do it all over, I probably would’ve gone with the L5CX in the rear (smaller tweeter in the middle) and used the L5s in the front. The car comes with 5-1/4” speakers and the smaller size would allow me to get better off-axis performance when trying to blend with just a tweeter. It would also be easier to mount and would mate better to the door card. If anyone has an L5 + L5CX combo they’re willing to sell, I’d be interested.

Speaker Amp - Undecided
Of all the components to take someone else's advice on regarding how it might sound (especially over the internet), I think the speaker amp might be the worst.

Subwoofer? Really simple and has manufacturer's measured data that might give you an idea of how it should perform. Give it a good enclosure that matches it's characteristics and your application, some nice clean power, and it'll make bass. Speakers? A little more complicated but still fairly straight forward, especially if you're running active with a DSP. Choose ones made from materials that you like the sound of and find sizes that fit where you want to put them and can take how much ever power you want to give it to achieve your desired output. If you're running passive, see what kind of features and flexibility the crossover offers and if it'll work for your system. The part that requires the most consideration is probably the tweeter. If you choose one made of the material that you prefer (like beryllium, aluminum, silk or other textile) and one that has an Fs low enough so you can cross it over to suit your application, you shouldn't need too much tuning to get it to sound the way you like.

Amplifiers on the other hand! I've heard different people use opposing words to describe the same amplifier that it makes you start to wonder who is crazy or who is tone deaf.The truth is, they're all probably powering different speakers, and more than likely using a different source, so it's almost impossible to figure out what it'll sound like in your system unless someone is using the same exact gear. All an amplifier is suppose to do is take an input signal, increase it and then spit it out, while adding as little coloration and distortion to the signal as possible. I think the higher-end all-German offerings from Brax and Helix do that the best, but depending on your source, your speakers and your personal tastes, you might not actually want that.

My requirements for an amplifier are quite simple. Class AB, 75 - 100 wpc, and of good design and construction. The first two are fairly straight forward (take your 'good enough to fit the curve, Class D switching nonsense elsewhere), and with one of my goals being to not go deaf, I need my hearing, so I don't think I'll ever need more power than that from a good, clean amplifier. The design aspect, and construction to some degree, are where things vary wildly.

4-Channels
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Multis
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Signal Processing - To DSP or not to DSP, that is the question.

  • MOST150 interface (NavTV Zen-V) takes the digital, 2-channel signal from under the driver’s seat and gives optical out and RCA out.
  • Line Output Converter (Audiocontrol LC7i + ACR-1) takes 4-channel high level out from behind the radio, can sum if needed and can give a separate sub out with remote control.
  • Equalizer and Crossover (Audiocontrol EQX) takes two channel RCA in, allows you to EQ left and right with 6 half-octave and 7 full-octave bands. Has subsonic filter and can output 2ch full range, 2ch low passed and 2ch high passed.
  • All-in-one DSP (Helix DSP Mini + WiFi + Conductor) does optical or 4ch RCA in and 6ch RCA out. Have the WiFi module to connect my laptop wirelessly to the DSP and also have the Conductor to switch between present, adjust sub level and master volume


Wiring - Power/Ground, Distribution, Signal and Output
Circuit component Electrical wiring Cable Auto part Electrical supply

  • Positve battery terminal (KnuKonceptz Pro? + Post x) allows me to add 0 gauge, 4 gauge and 8 gauge 12V wires while re-using the factory positive lead.
  • 0 Gauge, OFC copper wire (Recoil x) with main fuse block, fused distribution block (T-Spec x). 0 gauge ground into same distribution block.
  • Distribution block for accessories (Recoil x) and 18 gauge OFC power and ground wires (install bay?)
  • Factory connector (VW x) and 18 gauge OFC, 9 conductor speaker wire to get signal to the processor in the trunk.
  • iDatalink harness (VW 1xx) to connect to factory speaker wire harness and 2 runs of 16 gauge OFC, 11 conductor wire (T-Spec xx) send signal from the amplifiers to the 10 channels in the cabin.

Sound Treatment - CLD, Fiber Mat, CCF
 

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You might want to consider a mid/high pod at the triangle windows and factory tweet spots. I have a set of light gray a pillars with a hole drilled at the tweet if u need something to modify. The triangle windows would have the driver poke out a bit. The opening size is deceivingly small. You can easily wrap the outside of the window to cover the innards of the pods. I'd be concerned for someone's knee blocking the cup holder pod.

Your compiled gear appears fantastic. The dls and gz are especially beautiful.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You might want to consider a mid/high pod at the triangle windows and factory tweet spots. I have a set of light gray a pillars with a hole drilled at the tweet if u need something to modify. The triangle windows would have the driver poke out a bit. The opening size is deceivingly small. You can easily wrap the outside of the window to cover the innards of the pods. I'd be concerned for someone's knee blocking the cup holder pod.

Your compiled gear appears fantastic. The dls and gz are especially beautiful.
I'm not gonna lie, I bought that DLS amp based on its looks. It also sounds great, but doesn't give me enough power at 4 ohms for the sub that I want.

Mid/tweet pods were one of the first things I considered but then wondered if I could keep the car factory and still get great results. I'm gonna try 2-way first and then maybe try the mid in the door. The factory woofer has two sets of wires running to it so I can just steal one of those easily.

Did I tell you the car was manual or did you just assume?! It's hard to beat an AWD, turbo, manual wagon here in Maine, especially with a little extra ground clearance that the Alltrack offers.
 

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That's too bad about the dls. It's really elegant looking. I forgot about the front doors having dvc. That's a great idea to steal a set to feed the 3s. I do believe they are 6.5. i had no real trouble getting a 6.75 in there. Adapter ring can't be too wide otherwise it hits the door pin thing. Half inch to 3/4 tall is fine. But a little over 7 inch diameter is too much. The factory mount is an inch or more but the driver is recessed a bit.

You mentioned the manual from another Dustin m discussion we had. I'm in the sad wagen fwd auto. It gets up with the apr stage 1 tune. Without dsg i don't want to push the tranny harder. Otherwise is20 is daily driver perfection.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
I almost got my car tuned Friday (APR Plus), but couldn’t wait there the entire day for it to be done. Encountered a GT3RS for the first time, the very next day and then raced it all around Topsham, Brunswick and on the highway. Man I wish I at least had the tune hahaha (That’s his thumb he’s holding up as he flies by!)
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I’m not sure what speakers come in other Golfs but this one has 5-1/4s in the doors. They’re decent quality and actually sound pretty good. They are designed well and mate with the door card nicely. You’ll notice a consistent impression in the foam all the way around for a good seal. I’ll touch on this a little when I get into the install.
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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Part 2a - Installation: Running Wires

Weather was nice today in Maine so I actually got some work done on the car.

Started at the front with adding the battery terminal and running 0 gauge power wire. After taking the battery out to get to the firewall, I noticed VW conveniently left me the perfect place run a power wire. It’s like a little rubber nipple that you can just cut the end off, then ram the wire through.
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I had to use an additional battery terminal with a post extender, because I didn’t want to cut off the factory connector. KnuKnonceptz Ultimate Positive Battery Terminal with Vertical Top Post Adapter. The wire is Recoil OFC. I bought the dual amp kit but would probably avoid this in the future. The wires seem to be of decent quality, and more importantly I got the 20 ft I needed, but everything else kinda sucks, especially the main fuse holder. The cover can’t even close properly with the wire inserted.
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Everything else went smoothly, except when trying to tighten the terminal down. The screw faces a shoulder on the top of the battery and there’s little clearance for a tool to get in there so I had to cut down an Allen key.
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Then it’s just a matter of removing trim panels and snaking the wire down the length of the car. Getting this panel off can be a little tricky if you don’t pay attention. You have to remove the lever that opens the hood. To do that, there’s a little retainer clip on the backside that you need to slide out of the way, then the handle pulls straight out.
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There’s a nice channel beside the factory loom that fits the 0 gauge perfectly. The engineers were pretty smart about how they designed the panels so there aren’t any clips towards the outside that you have to worry about smashing your wire.
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Next to the trunk, where the amps will live.

Before:
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After:
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I need to cover most of the metal with CLD pieces and then fill the cavities in the wheel wells and hatch with sound absorbing material. I ordered some ResoNix Fiber Mat 45 to go in there but who knows if and when it’ll actually get delivered. For CLD I’m using some Second Skin Damplifier Pro that I had left over. I also realised I need a 3 or 4 meter MOST extension cable, that will go from under the driver seat and run alongside the power wire and speaker wires, so I can’t really go any further here.
Hood Bumper Automotive tire Automotive exterior Floor

This is the factory amplifier under the driver’s seat. Says it’s made by Alpine, no wonder I liked the sound! It’s good to have a long hex driver to get to this awkward bolt. The MOST extension cable will connect to the factory head unit here and go to the NavTV Zen V in the back. Two runs of 16 gauge, 11 conductor speaker wire also tie into 10 of the 12 channels of the factory speaker harness. I used T-Spec VSW1116 and an iDatalink HRN-AR-VW1 Harness. You have to pay close attention to what wires go where though, I’ll post a picture of my particular schematic later but others will likely vary.
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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
Part 2b - Installation: Front Door Speakers
I always start with the passenger side, just in case I screw anything up.
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Again, VW did a great job with this car. The door cavity is completely sealed with a factory block off plate and patches to cover any holes. The door card also has some cork type backer board and then a thick liner that helps with rattles and noise.
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The factory speaker is 5-1/4” DVC driver that is pretty stout. It’s held on by 4 rivets so I just drilled those out and attached the speakers brackets.
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Then I snipped off the head of the rivets and punched then through. Pro Tip: put your finger or a piece of tape on the back to catch the rivet as it’s hammered through. Each of the front doors has 1 stupid piece in there that I can’t seem to find. Oh well.
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The track for the window is also fairly close, so just be careful when selecting your woofers. About 2-5/8” away from the door. I used American International SG-650DX speaker adapters, which are stackable 1/2” rings, because I wasn’t sure how far in or out the speaker needed to be.
Automotive tire Electrical wiring Motor vehicle Gas Rim

I also put speaker baffles behind the drivers because sometimes rain does get back there. I had to use the larger diameter, shallow depth ones from XTC, 6-3/4" Speaker Baffles (Slim-line: 3-3/8" depth). I had pulled off the back door panel earlier to see what connectors the woofers and tweeters used. Those speakers are single voice coil and use “4pin 2.8mm VW Golf 6 taillights socket plug 191972714 automobile wire connector” from eBay. That’s just the name of it but I’m sure you can find it by searching for that part number that’s in there. The front door speakers however are dual voice coil, and use a similar looking connector but they have different tabs or channels. I ended up stealing the ones I was going to use for the back, and cut out the middle. Then stuck some 14 gauge speaker wire I had laying around. The woofers will take two pairs now but I can always steal one for the mids later.
Electrical wiring Cable Automotive tire Gas Auto part

Finished with the doors, for now. (Still waiting on ResoNix Fiber Mat 25)
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I trimmed the baffle all the way around so nothing was sticking out. I also had to cut the inner part of the door skin so the larger speaker would clear. The factory speakers had a very nice seal all the way around, so not much sound escaped into the door cavity.
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All around very impressed with the thought that went into designing this car and how well put together it is. The factory system really did sound good, but this’ll sound better. Right? I’m still waiting on the connectors for the tweeter harness and also a new replacement tweeter; more on that later, so I can’t really go much further there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
Part 2c - Installation: A-Pillars

Taking the pillars off is actually pretty simple, despite what you might read on the internet. Putting them back on can be a little tricky though.

I started by pulling the top of the pillar inward, and then worked my way down. It’ll come out a bit and then stop. This is to make space for the airbag to deploy, but not have the pillar whack you in the face. If you look up, between the airbag and the frame of the car, you should see 3 clips that look like this.
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All you have to do is take something like a long thin screwdriver (or a letter opener, wooden ruler, chopstick, whatever) and slide the clip upward. You only need to do this to the top two. The third, and lowest, one just goes in straight.
Hand Hood Automotive lighting Green Automotive mirror

Then gently, but with force, wiggle and pull the pillar out towards the grab handle. Once you have the pillar off, you can use needle nose pliers to remove the clips and put them pack into the pillar. Squeeze the body of the clip, not the ears, and pull.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
Part 2d - Installation: Rear door speakers.

Unlike the front doors, the rear has a single voice coil woofer mounted to the lower part of the door and a tweeter mounted in the door card just above the armrest. Since I’m using a coax speaker, I’ll need to get both sets of wires into the door cavity. To connect to the factory woofer harness I used XX and the connect to the factory tweeter harness I used XX.

One thing I started doing when I got to the back doors was the run a strip of cloth tape around the perimeter of the door card. I don’t know if this does anything but I’m hoping it will stop the hard plastic from rattling against the metal. I also put a layer on the tab that locks the door card in at the bottom.
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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
Part 2e - Installation: Subwoofer enclosure

The beginnings of my enclosure that sits inside the spare tire and below the floor.
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And she wonders why I have so many clamps…

Layer #2, or 7…
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I’m no baker, but I imagine this is what it must feel like to make a cake.
 

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I’m really intrigued by this, can’t wait for the next chapter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
EVERYTHING RATTLES!!!

Since I got the midbass drivers installed in the doors the other day, I temporarily hooked up some equipment to get them playing while I waited on the tweeter and sound treatment stuff. VW did such a good job putting this car together and making it so quiet that I thought I could get away without treating the doors until Spring when it’s warmer. Nope! WRONG! Lol Every part of the door was buzzing, rattling, vibrating. The good news is that it sounds great and there’s a ton of output once I braced the door card with my body.

I don’t remember the factory speakers making the doors vibrate like this at all and those were pretty stout. Here’s a picture of them, along with the only other 5-1/4” I had laying around. ScanSpeak 15W on the left. I also weighed them, I tend to way things a lot, you should see my list of woodworking hand planes.
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Fender 5-1/4” DVC - 2:11.2
ScanSpeak 15W - 3:11.0
Illusion L6 Woofer - 1:7.6
Morel Virtus MW6 - 1:9.2
Illusion L6CX Coax - 1:14.7
Hertz MPX 165.3 Coax - 2:13.

So ut came the overly-excited door cards for some added mass and to see if I can get it to settle down a bit.

First I trimmed around the speaker opening because I’m pretty sure these little tabs were pressing against the speaker.

After:
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Then I moved on to treating the panel.

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I also want to give a quick should to anyone in the industry, man, woman (or child) that has to do this for a living. This is probably the least glorifying of all the tasks and no one will ever see it, but has such a profound effect on the overall outcome and performance of the system. Hats off to you, our silent SQ heroes.
 
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