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I think I'd rather get the 12AWG wire from monoprice

Speaker Wire

afterall, stranded oxygen free copper is stranded oxygen free copper, now if it was shielded or twisted pairs etc then it might be different.
 

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shipping is another $30. Not really that great of a deal, imo. In that case, it's about the same price, shipped, as the 14g or 16g from monoprice, linked above. But, not a bad deal either.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
the deal from monoprice is for 50 ft...this is for 300ft! each bid represents 6 50ft spindles.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
opps i was looking at the wrong wire...your right my fault
 

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Not sure about the practicality of 16awg speaker wire for an average car installation.

In my car the amps are in the rear. I have 12 foot runs to my mids and tweets in the front doors.

If I were to use 16awg I'd be losing 5% of the 100w being sent across the speaker cables. For all four speakers that would represent a 20w being lost due to the resistance of small gauge cables.

I have a pretty small car, too; a Scion xA. For a larger car, truck, SUV, you'd expect longer runs and even more power lost.

I won't use anything under 12awg for runs under 15ft. Over 15ft and I'll use 10awg or sometimes 8awg.
 

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Not sure about the practicality of 16awg speaker wire for an average car installation.

In my car the amps are in the rear. I have 12 foot runs to my mids and tweets in the front doors.

If I were to use 16awg I'd be losing 5% of the 100w being sent across the speaker cables. For all four speakers that would represent a 20w being lost due to the resistance of small gauge cables.

I have a pretty small car, too; a Scion xA. For a larger car, truck, SUV, you'd expect longer runs and even more power lost.

I won't use anything under 12awg for runs under 15ft. Over 15ft and I'll use 10awg or sometimes 8awg.
So you'd lose 5 watts per channel. Hardly audible. 16 gauge is more than adequate for most runs in car audio.
 

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So you'd lose 5 watts per channel. Hardly audible. 16 gauge is more than adequate for most runs in car audio.
You're probably right if power loss were the only issue here. A bigger problem is that the power loss isn't linear across the frequency spectrum. A speaker with a nominal impedance of 4 ohms isn't 4 ohms at all frequencies. A speaker can have an impedance of, say, 4 ohms at 300Hz but 30 ohms at 2500Hz. When cable resistance is too high the speaker's frequency response will tend to follow the rise and fall of its impedance curve. The greater the impedance variation, the more noticeable the response changes will be.

Simple power loss calculations may say that you're losing 1/2dB overall, but because the smaller wire is changing the overall frequency response characteristics of the amp/speaker system at certain frequencies the loss can be as high as 2dB.

Small gauge speaker cable also affects damping factor. Higher resistance lowers the damping factor of a speaker/amplifier system. Simple physics. Damping factor, for those who don't know what it is, is the ability of an amplifier to control the moving mass of a speaker. The higher the damping factor the more accurately an amplifier can control movement of the speaker. Smaller wire introduces higher resistance and lowers the damping factor of the amp/speaker system.

The 5% number may seem fairly small, but that's just an example of a system pushing 100w. Bump up the power to 150w or 200w, lengthen the cable runs, etc., and you're changing the characteristics of the speaker/amp/cable system relationship considerably.
 

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You're probably right if power loss were the only issue here. A bigger problem is that the power loss isn't linear across the frequency spectrum. A speaker with a nominal impedance of 4 ohms isn't 4 ohms at all frequencies. A speaker can have an impedance of, say, 4 ohms at 300Hz but 30 ohms at 2500Hz. When cable resistance is too high the speaker's frequency response will tend to follow the rise and fall of its impedance curve. The greater the impedance variation, the more noticeable the response changes will be.

Simple power loss calculations may say that you're losing 1/2dB overall, but because the smaller wire is changing the overall frequency response characteristics of the amp/speaker system at certain frequencies the loss can be as high as 2dB.

Small gauge speaker cable also affects damping factor. Higher resistance lowers the damping factor of a speaker/amplifier system. Simple physics. Damping factor, for those who don't know what it is, is the ability of an amplifier to control the moving mass of a speaker. The higher the damping factor the more accurately an amplifier can control movement of the speaker. Smaller wire introduces higher resistance and lowers the damping factor of the amp/speaker system.

The 5% number may seem fairly small, but that's just an example of a system pushing 100w. Bump up the power to 150w or 200w, lengthen the cable runs, etc., and you're changing the characteristics of the speaker/amp/cable system relationship considerably.

where does the 5% figure comes from?

What is actual resistance of 16 gauge wire of length 12ft? it should be next to zero.

What is the impedance of a 12ft wire at 20k Hz? Impedance won't vary a lot unless the frequency gets very high, in range of mega Hz.

having 12 gauge wire doesn't hurt either though...:)
 

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where does the 5% figure comes from?

What is actual resistance of 16 gauge wire of length 12ft? it should be next to zero.

What is the impedance of a 12ft wire at 20k Hz? Impedance won't vary a lot unless the frequency gets very high, in range of mega Hz.

having 12 gauge wire doesn't hurt either though...:)
5% comes from the bcae1.com speaker wire selector assistant.

The actual resistance of 16awg at 12ft is 0.1 ohm, so, yes close to nothing :) 12awg for the same run would be 0.03 ohm, even closer to nothing.

The voltage drop for the aforementioned 12ft 16awg run is 0.47v. 12awg for the same run is 0.19v.

:) You're probably right. I'm just paranoid. I always err on the side of caution.

E
 

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I have some of this cable in my car right now, the strand count is lower than I like which makes it not as flexible as other brands in the same gauge cable. The 16 gauge knu wire I have is better in my opinion
 
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