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Is it just me or what the title says is really true.
I always had a nice SQ sub (Hertz Mille 15 and Focal KX46 now 40) and Audison VRX 1.500 or Voce 5.1 or Mosconi 100.2 bridged) and I tend to believe that when I had lower impedance the sound was harsher and muddied????

I could be wrong i'm just trying to figure out if this is true or not?
What do you guys think ?

I personally like the sharp tight clean punchy bass for my music (trance and dance) as opposed to the mushy muddy and distortion sounding low bass (hip hop and rap)
 

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It's all in your head. A good amp will still be under 1% TDH even under 1ohm.
When you had the 2 channel bridged each channel was at 2ohm.
 

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I hope so, because from what I remember when I was testing for this year's ago I DID hear a difference i'm just not sure anymore
 

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You thought you heard a difference, or the difference was because of something else.

Also, hip hop and rap sound much better with good bass, muddy, distorted bass is from a bunch of kids with terrible systems. Get your substage right and listen to Dr. Dre's 2001 and you'll see how good rap can sound.
 

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You thought you heard a difference, or the difference was because of something else.

Also, hip hop and rap sound much better with good bass, muddy, distorted bass is from a bunch of kids with terrible systems. Get your substage right and listen to Dr. Dre's 2001 and you'll see how good rap can sound.
IMO, The best produced rap album ever. Very clean.
 

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Doesn't your damping factor reduce every time you drop the impedance? Also running a amp at a easier load helps with other issues like heat, current etc... unless your trying to hit numbers a decent amp that does 500+ at 4ohms bridged is 9/10 times plenty - if you need more power rather buy a bigger amp?

Sometimes having 2 amps drive 2 subs works out better - as some amps don't double the power from 4ohms bridged to 2ohms bridged so you get more power to each driver with 2 amps and you keep your load easier

Dunno... that's my take - also depends on what you want out of your system as well I suppose


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I won't run any amp below 2 ohms even if it's stable to 1 ohm. No good reason other than a mental one. Power is cheap these days and you don't have to buy expensive amps to get great sound especially when that amp is for a subwoofer. Buy an oversized amp and run it at 4 ohms and be happy. 4 out of the 5 subs in my collection are either d2 or single 4 so 4 ohms is all my 1 ohm stable amp will ever see. Just how it worked out.
 

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Don't bother much on a driver's impedance load. Sometimes I do believe that running higher than 4ohm at 8ohm sound more superior than running at 1, 2 or 4ohm. But again, it is just a busted myth.
Running higher ohm load will reduce the amp's output while running lower ohm load will make more heat on the amp.
The more important point is, running your amp at higher efficiency will be better.
 

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IMO, The best produced rap album ever. Very clean.


In the same vein, Snoop's Doggystyle is up there too


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I prefer 4 ohms when possible, but that's not always the case. I'm about to run my sub(s) @ 1 ohm for the first time, & I'm a little concerned about the amp (MMATS HiFi6150d) overheating. Time will tell...
 

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Throw a fan on it :)
I ran cheater amps at 1ohm bridged back in the day. A couple of 100cfm fans kept things reliable. I still have those amps and they still sound great (SS Class A 6.0s)


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Doesn't your damping factor reduce every time you drop the impedance?
Yep, and that's the biggest issue in terms of making your bass sound sloppy. Speakers are piezoelectric. That's a fancy word meaning that not only does electricity make them move, but moving them generates electricity.

A speaker's cone has mass, and therefore it has inertia. When it's moving in a given direction, it tends to keep moving in that direction. This momentum actually generates electricity, and the amp must overcome this electricity (called "back EMF") to start the cone moving in the other direction.

And just as a speaker wired at 2ohms draws more power from an amp that a speaker at 4ohms, a speaker at 2ohms generates more back EMF than a speaker at 4ohms.

Getting the cone to change directions quickly and crisply is an important key in creating tight, punchy bass. And running at a lower ohm load makes it tougher for the amp to do that.
 

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Butler has shown how little the amplifiers damping factor effects it.
His test shown it didn't make any difference until it reached single digits.
 

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I experimented with different sub/amp setups for about 10 years. FWIW, I always enjoyed the higher ohm setups more, they just sounded better.


They also have amps with adjustable damping factor.
 

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Yep, and that's the biggest issue in terms of making your bass sound sloppy. Speakers are piezoelectric. That's a fancy word meaning that not only does electricity make them move, but moving them generates electricity.

A speaker's cone has mass, and therefore it has inertia. When it's moving in a given direction, it tends to keep moving in that direction. This momentum actually generates electricity, and the amp must overcome this electricity (called "back EMF") to start the cone moving in the other direction.

And just as a speaker wired at 2ohms draws more power from an amp that a speaker at 4ohms, a speaker at 2ohms generates more back EMF than a speaker at 4ohms.

Getting the cone to change directions quickly and crisply is an important key in creating tight, punchy bass. And running at a lower ohm load makes it tougher for the amp to do that.
Before we go down the damping factor rat-hole, here is another perspective...
https://www.rubyservsales.com/myth-busting-damping-factor-a-misunderstood-rating/

I would pay attention to the quote from Andy W in the above link.

And for what it is worth, "piezoelectric" is a term most commonly used to refer to a specific electrical property of certain materials. Most speakers are not "piezoelectric" by common definition (some tweeters are). However, it is true that cone/magnet motion can generate electric current in the voice coil (aka 'back-EMF').
 

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I am no expert but 500 watts at 2 ohms is not the same as 500 watts at 4 ohms.
From a speaker/subwoofer perspective there is no practical difference.

For my commercial home theater subwoofers, I run them at 2 ohms and for subs that share an amp, each sub driver runs at 2 ohms so the amp sees a 1 ohm load (SpeakerPower amps). No difference in sound quality or any other measurable difference other than the subs have reduced volume because each sub is getting 2000w instead of the full 4000w. And I have a $1300 Earthworks M50 measuring mic with a $1500 MOTU microphone preamp to do the measurements.

EDIT: For this discussion, I don't think there is any difference between running a sub at 1/2/4/8 ohms etc with a quality amp that is designed for those low impedance loads. Good luck measuring a difference much less hearing a difference. Also, many amps put out more power at 2 ohms so if you stick to 4 ohms only, you're leaving power on the table for, in my opinion, no good reason. But don't worry, you'll have plenty of company in the audiophile mystics club.
 

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I'd also like to point out the comparison that is being discussed here, 4 better than 2 ohms is an old discussion. The previous audiophile discussion was is 8 ohm better than 4 ohm and for the longest time home audiophiles wouldn't run lower than 8 ohm speakers. To me, that audiophile myth is the same as this discussion of 4 vs 2. Amps, if designed for it, are quite capable of running at 2 amps, and some even at 1 ohms.
 

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Taking rise into account many well built amps won't have any issues running .25ohm.
But you need to know your rise before you try it.
Sure THD levels go up but then it's a question of is it audible. Normally the answer is no in sub bass
 

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I prefer 4 ohms when possible, but that's not always the case. I'm about to run my sub(s) @ 1 ohm for the first time, & I'm a little concerned about the amp (MMATS HiFi6150d) overheating. Time will tell...
Mine never overheated at 1 ohm. ;)

Throw a fan on it :)
I ran cheater amps at 1ohm bridged back in the day. A couple of 100cfm fans kept things reliable. I still have those amps and they still sound great (SS Class A 6.0s)
1. It already has a fan on it
2. Full-Range class D is a completely different animal from your SS Class A 6.0 amplifiers
 
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