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I was fastening my sub enclosure down in the trunk and I thought I was sure that the spot I wanted to bolt into was not behind the gas tank. I was wrong. I unknowingly drilled two 5-1/6" holes into the sheet metal and straight into the gas tank. I didn't realize this at first but then I soon smelled gasoline. None was leaking out anywhere but the smell was very strong. Now when I drive the whole care reeks of gasoline.

So how do I plug up these holes? I was thinking of using epoxy.
 

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I would use a gas resistant RTV silicone and on top of it I would put a small square of metal maybe an inch square just to reinforce it. Gasoline can creep under it if you have a flaw in the epoxy or the part flexes a little and the epoxy cracks a bit at the edge and gasoline will creep under the joint.
 

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I would use a gas resistant RTV silicone and on top of it I would put a small square of metal maybe an inch square just to reinforce it. Gasoline can creep under it if you have a flaw in the epoxy or the part flexes a little and the epoxy cracks a bit at the edge and gasoline will creep under the joint.
what he said.. Gasoline is extremely thin. I would go over it a few times just to be safe. whatever you do dont try to weld it shut ;)
 

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I would go down to the wrecking yard and get a gas tank. I wouldn't mess around now that you punctured your tank. Who knows, It could be an easy switch out. Just make sure to drain it if you decide to replace the tank.
 

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new tank..
duh.. rtv even supposedly gasoline resistant is not!!!
plastic tanks can be removed and ultrasonically welded
go to junk yard n get u a new tank..
 

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I would go down to the wrecking yard and get a gas tank. I wouldn't mess around now that you punctured your tank. Who knows, It could be an easy switch out. Just make sure to drain it if you decide to replace the tank.
I agree, would be stupid to die over god damn gas tank. i would weld it if metal or replace if plastic, I attempted to fix gas leak in motorcycles tried every freaking silicon available with no luck, drain it wash with running water, weld it properly and remember your mistake, better then get one spark and die in flames.
 

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I agree, would be stupid to die over god damn gas tank. i would weld it if metal or replace if plastic, I attempted to fix gas leak in motorcycles tried every freaking silicon available with no luck, drain it wash with running water, weld it properly and remember your mistake, better then get one spark and die in flames.
x2
Replace the tank. There are a lot of things that I would be okay with patching holes in, a gas tank is NOT on that list. Better safe than sorry bro.
 

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Two options.
1) Drop the tank and have it professionally (ie. not you cousin randy in the parking lot of his apartment complex) repaired/welded, either sonic or traditionally.

2) Drop the tank and find a new one at the local U-pull.

Use the time inbetween to weld a couple nutts to the bottom of the trunk floor so you can use bolts and lock washers to secure the encloseure.

Lesson learned, without getting to expirence what third degree burns feel like.
 

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So I'm going out on a limb here and assuming you mentioned 5/16". Drop the tank after you drive out all the gas. Get a tap the next size up and some pan head screws to match with nylon washers. Tap the holes, apply small amount of silicon around the holes then put a screw with a nylon washer in. don't over tighten or you'll strip the screws. Allow the silicon to cure and reassemble.
Its on the top so you'll be fine

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There are several ways to go. First one is to get a new or used gas tank. The second is a patch. A quick Google search yelded that a steel patch and epoxy would be a permenent fix. You can call Loctite or 3M and ask for the best epoxy for the application. JB Weld WILL also work.

From the JB Weld website:
Question: Is J-B Weld resistant to water and/or gasoline?
Answer: When fully cured, J-B Weld is completely resistant to water, gasoline, and about every other petroleum product or automotive chemical. For wet-surface or submerged water or gasoline repairs, try our SteelStik or WaterWeld.
FAQs » JB Weld

I don't know what is in this kit, but this has a good chance of working too:
Epoxy Gas Tank Sealer
http://www.caswellplating.com/restoration-aids/epoxy-gas-tank-sealer.html


Regarding the particles in the gas, not good. But you filter can easily handle it and the particals are to large to 'clog' it.

You can make a permanent repair with labor or with science. Science will save you $300 and about 5 hours (calling junk yards, going to junk yards, finding out they didn't have the right part at the junk yard, making more calls to junk yards and 3 hours installation.
 

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So I'm going out on a limb here and assuming you mentioned 5/16". Drop the tank after you drive out all the gas. Get a tap the next size up and some pan head screws to match with nylon washers. Tap the holes, apply small amount of silicon around the holes then put a screw with a nylon washer in. don't over tighten or you'll strip the screws. Allow the silicon to cure and reassemble.
Its on the top so you'll be fine

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If it's a metal tank, there isn't enough material to tap. Sheet metal the thickness of a thread on a bolt doesn't do well when tapping. Even plastic tanks are really thin. I haven't found any silicone of any type that will keep gas from seeping through.

Get a new tank. It's well worth the piece of mind knowing that it's sealed up properly.
 

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Union Ironworker here. Sheet metal is most definitely tap capable. Silicon is not the seal, nylon washer is. Silicon will simply help stop vibrations from backing out the machine screws. Being as the bite isn't really big they wont exactly be torqued down. And once the screw is inserted the thread gap will be small enough to stop any leak be itself. Bear in mind that this is on the top of his tank and will see very little contact with any gas under pressure.

And for reference, the majority of fuel cells on the road today are metal shell with a plastic liner. Any motor company that uses a strictly plastic tank will never get my money. Its a fireball waiting to happen.

Just thought I would add. I have performed this repair as described in a hatchback the I sent a screw through while mounting an 8ft^3 wall for 18's in. After 4 years it still was like I fixed it the day before. And cost is around 15 bucks.

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A stitch in Time would have saved Nine , that being said ...

Use a screw twice as big as hole drilled and some epoxy [ just run it in, in an attempt to fill and seal hole would be cheapest way ( E.W.P = easiest way possible ).

More expensive way = undo fastenings and drop tank , patch or replace tank , reattach.

G'luck !
 

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I did this once on my acura. plumbers epoxy fixed it a couple minutes. stuff has about 15 minutes work time and dries hard as a rock.
 

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Fix it correctly, repair professionally or replace it.

I know if I dropped the tank in a car and found that some person had drilled through it then fixed it halfass with silicone and screws I'd be pissed.

This is why I'm mortally terrified of used cars when I don't know the previous owner.
 

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I second JB Weld.

Rough sand the spot, mix up some epoxy, and apply generously.

Let it set for 24 hours before driving.

You "could" use JB weld and a screw. I would perfer that over silicone and a screw.
 

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I second JB Weld.

Rough sand the spot, mix up some epoxy, and apply generously.

Let it set for 24 hours before driving.

You "could" use JB weld and a screw. I would perfer that over silicone and a screw.
I would do that. If you do a Google search you will find that there are many epoxy products made specifically for the application.
 
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