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Fix it correctly, repair professionally or replace it.

I know if I dropped the tank in a car and found that some person had drilled through it then fixed it halfass with silicone and screws I'd be pissed.

This is why I'm mortally terrified of used cars when I don't know the previous owner.
No shit, huh? I pray to God that this wasn't on a Benz or a BMW...

I mean hey I made my fair share of install mistakes and I know the feeling.

I'd get it fixed professionally. I don't trust epoxy would stand up well to gasoline in the long term. You also should do something about it fast. If you have any power cables near those holes, and they just happen to short to ground, well let's just say things ain't gonna be pretty.
 

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. I don't trust epoxy would stand up well to gasoline in the long term. You also should do something about it fast. If you have any power cables near those holes, and they just happen to short to ground, well let's just say things ain't gonna be pretty.
The right epoxy will hold up to gasoline without a problem. As long as the surface is properly prepped and cleaned.

We use epoxy to seal the top panels on the predator's fuel cells.

Same with F16s. And the F16 uses a pressurized fuel system.

The Predator runs on high dollar gas, the F16 runs on JP8+100 (basically kerosene)
 

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Personally what I've always done is solder it with plumbing solder, prepped it well by sanding to bare metal, to solder onto steel you need a good high mass soldering iron and zinc chloride acid flux. This way you're not using a torch and risk blowing yourself up.
 

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Repair it properly or replace I say.
I've had his happen ( from a professional shop) and they used some sort of epoxy on it. Came off within days just as I was about to drive from Texas to Florida. On top of fact they didn't even tell me. Not sure what they used, if it was right kind of epoxy, but I say fix it right using welding
 

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JB Weld......or duct tape....just kidding about the duct tape....

I put a hole in my jeeps tank and JB Welded it 2.5 years ago. I really doubt your vehicle will ever take a beating like my jeep.....Never had an issue.
 

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is the damn tanks plastic or steel??
jb weld can=be used for temp repair on STEEL..
no epoxy will hold to plastic without vibrating loose over time
yea maybe some aerospace shit that is made to bond plastic.

PLASTIC tanks are ultrasonically welded
they do make a patch kit that chemically bonds the plastic but you have to know type of plastic.. tanks are made from two different kinds. ya have to have right adhesive and right patch.

drop the tank if its plastic and put a dam pipe plug and cold glue a pipe plug made of the same material HDPE or nylon into the tank if u hit a thick part of tank you MAY be able to tap enuff thread to get the pipe plug to seal.


oh they do make plastic welders you can rent.. but u got to know tank material..20 yrs of fixing dang jap crap plastic motorcycle tanks.. the plastice welders were the only thing wefound to be permanent..
 

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Fiixing that hole with epoxy is one correct way to fix that hole. Take it from me, a mechanical engineer for 32 years.

"I don't trust epoxy." Why not?

I used to work for Yardney Electric Inc., manufacturer of some truly bad ass batteries for the military... NASA uses epoxy all over the shuttle. Epoxy is used in every ICBM made, at least US made. Every torpedo made in the last 40 years has epoxy in it. You couldn't put a submarine together without epoxy.

All the carbon fiber in Stealth Fighter and F22’s are made of carbon fiber and epoxy. We should call up the army and tell them they screwed and tell them to do it right.

Suzuki used epoxy to bond swing arms together in their DRZ dirt bike. Swingarms are very heavily loaded. Take a 70 foot jump and that epoxy lets go and you are totally screwed. Some pretty serious prodcut liability folks.

I don't trust epoxy. Do you trust scientific testing? I called up a chemist friend that works for 3M (I used to work for 3M) and talked to him about their test procedures. Epoxy's are cured and then soaked in solvents (if that is applicable) at elevated temperatures for YEARS. Every 10 Celsius increase in temperature doubles chemical reaction time. Room temp is 25C. Testing is typically conducted at 55C, so every year at 55C is equal to 8 years real times testing. ater conditioning the test sample is then put through a series of applicable tests, adhesion, toughness, flexibility and whatever... This is called accelerated aging testing.

‘I don't trust epoxy.’ That is like me saying the earth looks flat from where I am standing and because it does I can ignore science.

If I chose the correct epoxy for an application, and prepare the surface properly and cured it properly I will have confidence that the product will work properly; especially if the product is from 3M or Loctite or Permatex (a division of Loctitie).

I added an oil return to my oil pan for a turbo. It was welded and it leaked. I had the guy (a welder) weld it again and it still leaked. Not as much as before, but it still leaked.

So now I don't trust welding. That is my opinion and the last thing I need is any science to back it up.
 

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One more thing to consider about patches. Suppose it works fine, for now. Two years go by and BAM! you get rear ended, 100% other drivers fault. The patch that had been doing it's job for two years, fails. Car goes up in flames, total loss. Insuance company investigates the loss, finds the patches, and informs you that "due to non D.O.T. approved alterations to the fuel cell, we regret to inform you that you have effectively voided your policy with our company. Have a nice day." Shit out of luck, and that's if there are no pending lawsuits. Fixing a gas tank like mentioned was fine, fifty years ago, but I digress to admit it is a different day and age, where those types of fixes come with alot of strings attached.
 

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One more thing to consider about patches. Suppose it works fine, for now. Two years go by and BAM! you get rear ended, 100% other drivers fault. The patch that had been doing it's job for two years, fails. Car goes up in flames, total loss. Insuance company investigates the loss, finds the patches, and informs you that "due to non D.O.T. approved alterations to the fuel cell, we regret to inform you that you have effectively voided your policy with our company. Have a nice day." Shit out of luck, and that's if there are no pending lawsuits. Fixing a gas tank like mentioned was fine, fifty years ago, but I digress to admit it is a different day and age, where those types of fixes come with alot of strings attached.
Thats a good point.. :rolleyes:
 

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That pretty much never happens, first if the car bursts into flames due to a big collision the evidence will pretty much burn away into a carbonized pile of mess. They don't go through with a fine tooth comb looking for any suspicious tiny mods.

This is especially true with motorcycles. So many of them get custom modified everything all with possibly questionable workmanship. I'm talking welds on frames, custom modded and welded gas tanks and yet when they get in an accident with so much as a scratched frame, automatic write off, no questions asked and you can even buy the bike back from the insurance company.

The insurance company already made their money off yours and other's premiums. If they tried every time to look for reasons to deny coverage and have to prove it in court should the client sue, they'd have lost all their profit off you just with the lawyer fees and court costs. It basically costs them less to write your car off because you've been in an accident terrible enough to send your car in flames and they'll just collect and make their money back from either the other person's insurance or raising the premiums if the other person has the same insurance.

I mean it's just basically a tiny pinhole. Look up Por-15 tank sealer, people have been treating motorcycle gas tank pinholes with it forever and that stuff is basically just an epoxy anyways. No one has ever lost an insurance settlement because they used Por-15.
 

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Once my car went over a log at high speed on an interstate on a mountain pass. (My philosophy is always keep cool in such situations and go over the sudden obstacle instead of making sudden braking or steering moves, specially when on one side you have an 18 wheeler and on the other side a ditch). There was a loud knock from the bottom of the car. I thought it was no problem, but later the car run out of gas, but I managed to reach a populated town. The gas tank hole was pretty big, may be at least an inch in diameter. Next day I found an experienced welder shop. They welded my gas tank and put it back on the car. The cost was less than $200. A brand new gas tank from AutoZone would cost the same $200, but I'd have to pay someone to install it.
 

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Steel tanks can be fixed with a big ass soldering iron and lead (no flame, no boom)
Plastic tanks are pretty thick...just tap 1/8 npt and put a brass plug in there.
end of story
 

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good get us some missile epoxy then.. ive welded my share if DRZ swingarms look at one 5 yrs old.. u can see where the joint is separating I got over 30+ yrs..and 1 got 2 ama #1 plates to back up that 30+ yrs.. if your welder cant fix that is a problem with wrong technique rod or incompatible metals.. no different than picking wrong glue....

the proper epoxy might hold IF everything is done RIGHT and you get the RIGHT epoxy..
most of that military crap is not COMMERCIALLY available.. I know .. I repair airplanes now. and we cant get it.. ya know the wing skins that are glues on.. you only have X amount of time and can only apply in humidity controlled environments to glue the wing skins on.. or guess what.. the joint WILL fail...

yea i freaked when I was about 16 n saw the dude fixing my aunts 63 ford falcon tank with a torch and soldering iron with gas in the tank..LOL
 

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you really need to drop the tank and see what kind of material and surface you have where the holes are. if it's sheet-metal you could use
Loctite Fixmaster Fast Set Steel Putty. Loctite is the best stuff in the business.
If it's plastic, see how thick the material is- if it's thick enough then you could tap it with a pipe thread tap and seal it with a threaded plug and some teflon tape.
 

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So I'm going out on a limb here and assuming you mentioned 5/16". Drop the tank after you drive out all the gas. Get a tap the next size up and some pan head screws to match with nylon washers. Tap the holes, apply small amount of silicon around the holes then put a screw with a nylon washer in. don't over tighten or you'll strip the screws. Allow the silicon to cure and reassemble.
Its on the top so you'll be fine

Sent From Your Moms Closet Using TapaTalk Pro
WTF,lol:eek::D
 

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i did this to my jeep and realized it because i started throwing a evap leak code. i dropped the tank and used aircraft grade epoxy from work thats like $75 a kit with some flat metal covers pieces. it worked perfect and has for 2 years now and hasnt thrown a code since.
 
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