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Discussion Starter #64
Pigtail harnesses made for the Scan-Speak Tweeters.

Bill of Materials:

6" Lengths of 15AWG Supra Cable Sweden from Madisound
German MDPC SATA Cable Sleeve from Mod-One (German made TechFlex)
Silver Solder from WBT (for tweeters, everything else got Cardas)
Genuine EC3 Connectors from EFlite
Heatshrink for terminals and harness from Mod-One and 3M
 

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Discussion Starter #66
dumb question on my part, but i take it you need a different type of machine to do the cutting?or how does this whole thing work?
No. No cutting. This is all 3D PRINTING. Check out the website for Mark Forged 3D Printers. (I have no affiliation with them but I use their equipment and love it).
 

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Discussion Starter #67
Pictures re-posted of stealth mounting the C-DSP controller recessed into a tray that fits into the dash. It sits next to the headunit.
 

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On the Mark Forged 3D printer...printing in Onyx, which is carbon reinforced nylon with Kevlar support layers.
Does that filament trash your nozzle or your print head?

I started 3D printing in PLA but stepped up to PETG when one of my 3D printed speakers warped on my dash in the sun... in January :(

 

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Discussion Starter #72
No it does not. The manufacturer (Mark Forged) sells this media. The print head nozzle occasionally needs to be cleaned but it is never trashed.
PLA is not a structural material to print with (in my mind, neither is ABS). It is made from recycled starch. Did you look at its thermal stability and typical lifecycle? Sorry to say- for a prototype to test fit everything it was a fine choice. But to use as the finished piece for the application? Bad idea.
 

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I have not read through this whole thread but has anybody used a 3d scanner to scan let's say an OEM speaker mounting surface, import that scan into modeling software, and use it to model and print a custom mounting baffle?

I have many years of 3d modeling experience using Autodesk and Solidworks but have never once messed with a 3d printer and would like to learn more about them.
 

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Does that filament trash your nozzle or your print head?

I started 3D printing in PLA but stepped up to PETG when one of my 3D printed speakers warped on my dash in the sun... in January :(

I use pla with carbon fiber in it and use a hardened tip to slow the wearing from the carbon. Stability is great and its super strong.
 

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Discussion Starter #75
I think that could be done. You can outsource the 3D printing to online service providers who will quote you and print your parts. No reason to not try this since you already have the software experience.
 

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I have not read through this whole thread but has anybody used a 3d scanner to scan let's say an OEM speaker mounting surface, import that scan into modeling software, and use it to model and print a custom mounting baffle?

I have many years of 3d modeling experience using Autodesk and Solidworks but have never once messed with a 3d printer and would like to learn more about them.
I had bought a cheap scanner and it was worthless, but any scanner that gets even decent reviews is very expensive, but im sure they do work great at that.
 

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I have not read through this whole thread but has anybody used a 3d scanner to scan let's say an OEM speaker mounting surface, import that scan into modeling software, and use it to model and print a custom mounting baffle?

I have many years of 3d modeling experience using Autodesk and Solidworks but have never once messed with a 3d printer and would like to learn more about them.
Way way faster and more accurate to design it by hand. I could design a baffle in ten minutes, easy.

I've tried 3D scanning, but it took forever and the results were unusable. If a few of your points are 'off' the entire mesh is wrecked.

I could see how it could be useful for ultra complex objects, like a human body or a face.

 

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Way way faster and more accurate to design it by hand. I could design a baffle in ten minutes, easy.

I've tried 3D scanning, but it took forever and the results were unusable. If a few of your points are 'off' the entire mesh is wrecked.

I could see how it could be useful for ultra complex objects, like a human body or a face.

I agree whipping up a standard flat baffle by hand is much quicker but I'm thinking of an application where the OEM mounting surface is not flat and designing in a compound tilt for better on-axis response at the same time.
 

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Does that filament trash your nozzle or your print head?

I started 3D printing in PLA but stepped up to PETG when one of my 3D printed speakers warped on my dash in the sun... in January :(


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CZX8eHC7fws&ytbChannel=Thomas%20Sanladerer


What do you think of this? I'm no expert by any means but I've heard that there are a lot of different "PLA" in both composition and quality between different brands. I tried a PLA print yesterday and it seems quite workable, even drilled holes and threaded it. We'll see if it retains its shape, I'll just put it on the dash in the car for a few days and re-check.
 

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Wow, that's incredible!

I've always found it much easier to work with PLA, but I stopped using it when I had a part warp in my car. If annealing would make it withstand temperatures up to about 50-ish, I think I'd probably go back to using it.

Andy Wehmeyer was the one that convinced me to try PETG. But he's also gone to using ABS, as I understand it.

In my prints, I can generally get *slightly* better quality with PETG but they're soooooo slooooow. I have to run my printer at about 1/3rd speed.

And I'm always tinkering; I literally print three or four things a week. So being able to get the stupid things finished in hours instead of days would be wonderful.


Side note:

My other hobby is bikes. If you see posts on bike forums from Patrick Bateman, that's me. My wife hates it when I work with fiberglass, because it stinks. So one time she headed off to pick up the kids, and I baked a fiberglass part in the oven of our house.

One little problem...

I thought our stove was electric. But it's not. So I came pretty close to blowing up the entire house. This wasn't some tiny fiberglass part, this was a significant chunk of a bicycle frame that I baked.

 
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