DiyMobileAudio.com Car Stereo Forum banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
All,

I'm looking for a place in Atlanta that can do bench testing and general service on some amps. Every place I've found so far seems to just work on pro audio equipment (like guitar amps, power amps, etc.). I have two Zuki's and a USAmps tube amp I want tested. One of the Zuki's got some light corrosion on it in a couple spots at one point so bonus points if the place can safely clean them.

I somehow, apparently, have blown two subs. First my CDT-QES1020 which really makes me angry because I love that sub. Not sure what the problem is because it moves freely. Checked each VC with a multimeter, one reads 0 and one reads 330ohm. I replaced that with a Dayton HO. That one is now hard to move and has that grindy feeling that makes you sad. I suspect overpowered and in an undersized box.

Regardless just to be safe I want to get the amps checked. Not to mention it would be nice to know how much power the Zuki's put out before clipping.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you,
Rich
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
359 Posts
If you can ship them I can run them though my scope and meters and get some numbers for you. I’m in Florida near Orlando


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
646 Posts
Not impossible the amp is the cause, of course, but more than likely it is user error and you're settings your amp gains incorrectly. An amp by itself cannot over power a sub. The amp can be 2000W and your sub rated for 500W and the amp will not over power it. You, the user, will over power it by setting the gain too high and not listening for the distortion to back off on the gain. Or on the opposite, the sub can handle more power than the amp can give and you set the gain too high to the point your amp clips the signal.

For about $70 you could get an oscilloscope and determine the point your amp starts clipping a signal. With that, along with the voltage and the ohm load you'll have, you can approximate the wattage. For instance, if you determine the highest point before clipping on amp is 35volts and you'll wire it to 1 ohm, this would be 1225W.

You can use this calculator

Oscilloscope:
 
  • Like
Reactions: biscuit

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Not impossible the amp is the cause, of course, but more than likely it is user error and you're settings your amp gains incorrectly. An amp by itself cannot over power a sub. The amp can be 2000W and your sub rated for 500W and the amp will not over power it. You, the user, will over power it by setting the gain too high and not listening for the distortion to back off on the gain. Or on the opposite, the sub can handle more power than the amp can give and you set the gain too high to the point your amp clips the signal.
That's pretty much what I suspect has happened. I just want to be absolutely positive. :)

For about $70 you could get an oscilloscope and determine the point your amp starts clipping a signal. With that, along with the voltage and the ohm load you'll have, you can approximate the wattage. For instance, if you determine the highest point before clipping on amp is 35volts and you'll wire it to 1 ohm, this would be 1225W.
That didn't occur to me, thank you very much. A friend has an oscilloscope already and agreed to check them out. Also found a nice easy way to setup dummy loads with water heater elements that you can pickup at Lowes for about $6. Rated for 1500W @ 9.6ohm we can get pretty close to the right resistance.

So again, thanks for pointing me down the right path!

Rich
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top