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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Alright so here’s a shot of the near field frequency response of my driver side midbass -electronically crossed at 70 and 300 LR4 with no EQ- next to a flat target curve with matching crossovers.
Rectangle World Slope Font Output device

now here’s a look at that same drivers response from listening position -again no EQ just crossovers applied
Output device Rectangle Line Font Parallel


this suggests to me that no amount of additional deadening, sealing, etc. /replacing the speaker, is going to even remotely help me fill in these holes. I also hope i’m wrong about that lol.

I realize that the common geometry of a vehicle is the main culprit behind the ****ed up midbass responses; but i’m curious if there’s a way to compensate for that with something like more power or a door enclosure for example. If i could drop a 2nd woofer in my doors i would but i’m not certain there’s room, nor do i want to cut my door to pieces.

any input/advice greatly appreciated
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
the nulls are likely cabin modes. Just make some cuts and do the best you can. Every car has these issues.

Bring you sub in around 60hz to fill in the 80hz null. Then eq down the peak a little at 120 and 350 and that should be good.
View attachment 317366

google the audiofrog tuning guide if you need help with the tuning process.
right on dood
while i don’t particularly disagree with this approach, i’ve tried and it always leaves me with a quiet boring system. i suppose unless i put more power behind my mids i may have to live with that
 

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right on dood
while i don’t particularly disagree with this approach, i’ve tried and it always leaves me with a quiet boring system. i suppose unless i put more power behind my mids i may have to live with that
Cut only what needs to be cut. If you're killing the entire dynamic range than you've gone too far. Maybe consider trade offs like a less linear response or not perfectly matching left and right at the expense of output. Flat EQ curves look good but don't necessarily sound good.

I think you need to repost your response with some higher resolution as well.
 

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i’ll run out of power before i boost that whole channel roughly 7-9 decibels
Why I Rec at least 150w
But I never set gains with multi meter
Music power is surprisingly low.


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The way it falls a cliff around 100hz is the reason why the audiofrog and Erin have already hashed this out.
Choose a sub that can cover 100 and down amd cross there.
Ended up working for me in very small sedan just 5 inch midbass up front.
Same here - 5’s definitely need a sub crossed higher to make up for their lack of lower midbass output. Just what for the sub becoming boomy.

Downfiring my sub also helped to integrate it better.


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Seams there are three common ways to address this issue.

1. A more powerful midbass setup. Larger woofers or multiples of the same. (As you said)
2. Bring the subwoofer lowpass up.
3.Meet in the middle. More robust midbass with sub playing a bit higher.

As you said a typical vehicle wrecks midbass response but that is compounded by the way we tune and the power distribution in music. From around 200hz down to 60-30hz range the response is up 9-20db's or so. On top of that most music power is focused around 300hz so that combines a bit with the upward slope we tune for on the low end. Plus most people listen at louder levels while driving so that ups midbass demand even more.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Seams there are three common ways to address this issue.

1. A more powerful midbass setup. Larger woofers or multiples of the same. (As you said)
2. Bring the subwoofer lowpass up.
3.Meet in the middle. More robust midbass with sub playing a bit higher.

As you said a typical vehicle wrecks midbass response but that is compounded by the way we tune and the power distribution in music. From around 200hz down to 60-30hz range the response is up 9-20db's or so. On top of that most music power is focused around 300hz so that combines a bit with the upward slope we tune for on the low end. Plus most people listen at louder levels while driving so that ups midbass demand even more.
well said thanks man
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
The way it falls a cliff around 100hz is the reason why the audiofrog and Erin have already hashed this out.
Choose a sub that can cover 100 and down amd cross there.
Ended up working for me in very small sedan just 5 inch midbass up front.
thanks for the reply i’ve definitely considered this route. what sub/enclosure setup did you have in that sedan?
 

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Define well deadened, I’ve been realizing that everyone “has well deadened” doors, when in reality the doors are humming away transferring the backwave into the cabin like crazy. I had 3 layers of Noico 80mil and closed foam and the doors were a disaster compared to when I actually took the time and made the effort to make them extremely stiff and as some like to say solid as a rock. I prefer working with fiberglass but it seems most of the members who understand what dead actually means use sheets of lead or something like that. I’m surprised at the number of people throwing the term well deadened around with atrocious door response yet no one really ever points this out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Define well deadened, I’ve been realizing that everyone “has well deadened” doors, when in reality the doors are humming away transferring the backwave into the cabin like crazy. I had 3 layers of Noico 80mil and closed foam and the doors were a disaster compared to when I actually took the time and made the effort to make them extremely stiff and as some like to say solid as a rock. I prefer working with fiberglass but it seems most of the members who understand what dead actually means use sheets of lead or something like that. I’m surprised at the number of people throwing the term well deadened around with atrocious door response yet no one really ever points this out.
i never said my doors were “well deadened”.
i stated that they have 2 layers of butyl on the inner and outer door with a ccf on top
 
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