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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm about to start my deadening project and was wondering how to attach my MLV. I've seen the glue that attaches the seams together, but what should I use to attach it vertically to my doors and quarter panels? Also, should I glue it down to my CCF on the floor? Thanks for the input.
 

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you don't have to glue it to the CCF on the floor

for vertical surfaces, i'd glue them together and use velcro or something to hold it in place.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
so I can just lay it on the floor over the cld and ccf without attachment, thats good to know. I don't have door speakers, would it be sufficient to just cover the outer skin with all three layers and just put some CLD on the inner panel to stop resonance? My old BMW 2002 panels are basically flat against the panel, so every layer of material I put over the actual metal is going to make it more and more difficult to remount the door panel.
 

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IMHO, that would be more than sufficient.
Agreed. There are even reasons why it can be better to line the exterior door skin - it's just extremely difficult to do in many cars. You may still benefit from putting some CCF between the interior door skin and the trim panel - if trim panel resonance is an issue.

There's really no reason to glue anything down to the floor other than the CLD of course. The one exception might be if gluing the MLV to the CCF helps you hold a contour somehow.

I like Velcro Patches for the doors, but you knew I'd say that :)
 

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For the doors, sealing the edges of the MLV is imo critical for good sound deadening and baffle performance. When using it in my car I used the factory black crap, plus Liquid Nails Heavy Duty all around the edge, plus strips of Damplifier Pro all around the edges to help reinforce the Liquid Nails. It was a bit time consuming, but again I feel that there's just not much point using MLV unless you have a proper seal around the edges...
 

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If you're going to do it, do it right the first time. I would glue the MLV even on the floors. To work at its best, you want there to be no gaps. That means overlapping the MLV and gluing down all the seams. It also helps it stay in place better, but you certainly don't need to glue ever square inch of it.

I went to a lot of trouble sealing everything as tight as I could and I think it paid off.




For the doors, sealing the edges of the MLV is imo critical for good sound deadening and baffle performance. When using it in my car I used the factory black crap, plus Liquid Nails Heavy Duty all around the edge, plus strips of Damplifier Pro all around the edges to help reinforce the Liquid Nails. It was a bit time consuming, but again I feel that there's just not much point using MLV unless you have a proper seal around the edges...
You beat me to it.
 

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Let's stipulate you want all seams in the MLV to be completely sealed and that you want as few gaps in coverage as is possible. Don't want that to get lost in the rest of the discussion. The goal is zero openings in the barrier.

My preference is to use the vehicle itself to seal the edges. If you are applying MLV to the interior door skin, fitting it properly means that the trim panel will seal the edges for you. There's no harm at all in using something like the goo that's used to seal the stock vapor barrier but a permanent bonding agent means that you will have no choice but to damage the MLV the next time you need to get inside your door.

The floor is a similar situation. If you fit the MLV so that it follow the contours of the floor and seal the corners to fit, the barrier won't move at all, even before you return the seats and trim. Once the edges are locked down by the trim and the seats are bolted back in it is really hard to imagine any possible advantage to gluing anything to the floor. There's a reason that carpets aren't glued to the floor. When I first tried sound deadening a car - using the old school layers of CLD with CCF glued down on top of it I pretty quickly figured out what that reason was. There's always a chance that the vehicle will need to be gutted in the future. Why preclude that forever?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I'd rather not glue it down to the floor if I don't have to, the doors either. I think I'm gonna velcro first, I can always glue later if it doesn't work for me. I don't foresee any issues
 

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Can you use duct tape to seal the edges? what are the advantages of the special tape that is sold for the purpose? What is the brand, trade or scientific name of the 'balck goop'?
 

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Can you use duct tape to seal the edges? what are the advantages of the special tape that is sold for the purpose? What is the brand, trade or scientific name of the 'balck goop'?
I'd like to know the answer to this. Will duct tape or foil tape work to seal the mlv edges? Also. I've seen foil tape with an underlying butyl layer at Home Depot - would that work?
 

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Lead tape on the edges would be ideal, especially if you reinforce the adhesive with something better. The most important thing is to make sure there are no leaks anywhere or it would defeat the purpose.

I like the Damp Pro as a final seal because it seems to have a very strong adhesive long-term, a useful thickness of aluminum, and the butyl spreads around a bit and doesn't seem to create any air gaps. You'd be lucky if the duct tape still seals after a couple weeks in a car door.
 
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