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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
[I've posted here in the past, but am now under a new account]

Looking into the future, I intend to upgrade my current car audio setup. When that time comes, I will drag the old setup to make use of it in my room.

I've done as much research as I can to lay out a diagram, but my limited experience has left me with a few questions:

Link to diagram: Wiring Diagram

-Is the power supply unit sufficient? PSU link
-Is the battery sufficient? (it is the one currently used in my car, but runs off of a 115a alternator)
-What's the safest way to power the head-unit? Head-unit Link

If I am leaving something out entirely, please let me know!

Thank you in advance for your help.
 

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as long as you dont exceed the power supply rating, then yes. a power supply will work.
 

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as far as I know there is no need for a battery there. And old power supplies are either cheap or free, plus the wiring is fun. We like to tinker with **** or we wouldnt be on here after all
 

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only problem with computer power supplies is that they have ALOT more current in the 5v section than in the 12v section where we need it.
 

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this is true, but I have 3 of them without paying a dime and I can power amps and a head unit separately. Plus I think all 3 of mine have over 15 amps on the 12v side which is more than sufficient for HU power. 300 bucks just seems egregious
 

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now that is nice for the price. if it wouldn't ruin the fun of dismantling and re-assembling things I'd be all over it!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I wish I could go the cheap route and settle for 'just any' PSU, but i've seen that most CPU PSUs are low amperage (<5a ) and would not be geared for 800w of 12v-14v audio.

The battery is in place to serve as a buffer between the direct power supply and the components I will be powering.

(also, I intend to be able to use my system at its fullest, or close to it.)
I've seen numerous youtube demonstrations of car audio in-home use, and most of them are unable to turn it up very much due to insufficient power supply for full volume.

I'm grateful for the quick responses, though! (Especially that nice-lookin Turnigy, there)

I am still concerned for powering the head-unit, however. I don't want to over-power the poor thing, but I don't know what to use as a buffer between it and the battery / PSU.
 

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what do you mean by buffer? as long as the voltage is correct that is all that matters. it will only draw as much current as it needs. (you have your HU connected in your car right? your car battery has 2-300 amps of current available. it still works.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
what do you mean by buffer? as long as the voltage is correct that is all that matters. it will only draw as much current as it needs. (you have your HU connected in your car right? your car battery has 2-300 amps of current available. it still works.)
By buffer, I mean the battery would help regulate 'cleaner' voltage. (I'm still in the learning process here, so I'm taking word from snippits I've heard here and there in regards to car audio used in-home). If I understand right, using current straight from the PSU itself may include 'dirty' voltage, being that it contains spikes that can be hazardous to equipment without a buffer in use.

And right now I'm looking at the Turnigy PSU to see how I might connect everything to it.
 

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That turnigy ps is noisy, both the fans and on the scope. I got a dell power supply for free that has two 18a 12 volt outputs. Thats whats powering the cld test (and currently powering my living room music speakers).


well it was designed to recharge Lipos. :D

depending on where the electrical noise is, you can filter it with a small battery or 1F cap.

By buffer, I mean the battery would help regulate 'cleaner' voltage. (I'm still in the learning process here, so I'm taking word from snippits I've heard here and there in regards to car audio used in-home). If I understand right, using current straight from the PSU itself may include 'dirty' voltage, being that it contains spikes that can be hazardous to equipment without a buffer in use.

And right now I'm looking at the Turnigy PSU to see how I might connect everything to it.
if you set it to 13-14 volts I doubt noise from that or any P/S would do damage. ripple is in the mili-volt range. it might give you some audible noise, but that can be filtered as you mentioned.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
That turnigy ps is noisy, both the fans and on the scope. I got a dell power supply for free that has two 18a 12 volt outputs. Thats whats powering the cld test (and currently powering my living room music speakers).
I was a little worried about that noise issue, but I wonder if there is a cheap workaround to it, such that it would still be cheaper than my initial $280 PSU plan?
[edit: looks like minbari already answered this as I was writing this post!]

And that dell power sounds nice, but would something like that still be sufficient for clean, full/almost-full volume use in a 700-800w system?
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
So the Turnigy looks excellent for the price, using a battery to handle possible noise issues.

But now I have two concerns for it:

1) It looks to need 200-240VAC input, but I believe my outlets are 120VAC
[Edit: nvm. The model they used in the demonstration video was 200-240VAC input. The product on the page is 100-120VAC input]

2) If I power my head-unit from the smaller, 10a outputs on the P/S, I would have to reset everything on the head-unit each time I power it back on?
 

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So the Turnigy looks excellent for the price, using a battery to handle possible noise issues.

But now I have two concerns for it:

1) It looks to need 200-240VAC input, but I believe my outlets are 120VAC
[Edit: nvm. The model they used in the demonstration video was 200-240VAC input. The product on the page is 100-120VAC input]
specs on the site, looks like 120vac

Specs:
Input Voltage: 100~120V AC
Output Voltage: 13.8v~18v DC (adjustable)
Output Amps: 60A
Output Watts: 1080W
Temperature Cutoff: <100deg C
Cooling: Dual Fan
Dimensions: 258 x 138 x 73mm (case size)
Weight: 2.388kg
2) If I power my head-unit from the smaller, 10a outputs on the P/S, I would have to reset everything on the head-unit each time I power it back on?
Not if you have a battery connected, the battery would maintain the memory. you would just have to turn the supply back on when you use the system
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
specs on the site, looks like 120vac

Specs:
Input Voltage: 100~120V AC
Output Voltage: 13.8v~18v DC (adjustable)
Output Amps: 60A
Output Watts: 1080W
Temperature Cutoff: <100deg C
Cooling: Dual Fan
Dimensions: 258 x 138 x 73mm (case size)
Weight: 2.388kg
Yes, I read it and then watched their explanation video of it that happened to be a different model of it, and my brain forgot what I had read before it lol.

Proof I'm not crazy: Their video model

But yes, thank you very much for your help! =) Kudos to you, indeed!
 

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Lol, thats exactly what I use the turnigy for, is to recharge lipos.

The electrical noise isn't an issue, it's audible, but barely. In a normal home setting you wouldn't notice it unless it was absolutely quiet and you sat right next to the speakers. The fans are a little loud though.

The dell power supply I'm using has no problem sending 250 watts to the speakers with a class a/b amp, 2-3 of them would handle 700-800 watts. On paper it should be able to supply 432 watts, before losses from the amps. I got this one free, and its cleaner than the turnigy. I probably wouldn't buy a new one, but since we have a e-waste dump off at my job, I tear apart the computers we get in and see whats there. I've gotten two so far, the dell works good, the compaq not so much. It needs to see a load to maintain power at the 12v rail, and is only rated for 8 amps.
 

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I have been researching and testing my DELL 250w PSU, to use on my Hifonics Cyclops amp. But for some reason when I have the power to the positive and either have a separate wire running to the remote connection or have one of the yellow wires running to the remote my power supply shuts off. I had it working once and the amp turned on. But I had to disconnect it for a minute and reconnect it with my phone to try to play some music through a small speaker, the power supply won't turn the amp on any more. I've tried all different connections. All the yellows and all the blacks connected to the amp and a wire tapped out to the remote. And I just today tested one yellow wire to the remote and one wire to the plus side of the amp and it still just shuts off. Can't seem to figure out or duplicate the one time, the amp did turn on without the power supply shutting off. Any suggestions?
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I have been researching and testing my DELL 250w PSU, to use on my Hifonics Cyclops amp. But for some reason when I have the power to the positive and either have a separate wire running to the remote connection or have one of the yellow wires running to the remote my power supply shuts off. I had it working once and the amp turned on. But I had to disconnect it for a minute and reconnect it with my phone to try to play some music through a small speaker, the power supply won't turn the amp on any more. I've tried all different connections. All the yellows and all the blacks connected to the amp and a wire tapped out to the remote. And I just today tested one yellow wire to the remote and one wire to the plus side of the amp and it still just shuts off. Can't seem to figure out or duplicate the one time, the amp did turn on without the power supply shutting off. Any suggestions?
Well... I am not an expert in this zone of work, hence I created this thread to find answers and extend my knowledge.

However, from what little I have learned thus far, I might suspect that your Dell PSU (is this it?) is severely underpowering for what looks to be a 1.5k-4k watt amplifier?

To me, it looks hardly sufficient to get much of anything from the amplifier.
 
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