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Discussion Starter #1
For several years now I have been using a cardboard material called "chipboard" to form fiberglass parts for subwoofer enclosures. The chipboard is non corrugated and available in two thicknesses. You can find it at most any upholstery shop or upholstery supply.

I have found a thousand uses for fabricating with chipboard, but for enclosures I will generally form a skeleton of MDF and then staple pieces of chipboard to that framework. Depending on what the end product and finish needs to be I will sometimes fiberglass directly on top of the chipboard or mask over the chipboard and then glass so that I can remove the chipboard and then bond my newly glassed part back on to my project.





With a little imagination and a combination of a few panels you can come up with some complex shapes that will keep your piers scratching their heads, wondering how the hell you achieved the end result.



You can also use this technique for structural purposes inside of an enclosure. I use it to make curved slot ports since I am not a believer in flexible ports.

















The end result can display a lot of function and interest.















 

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Thanks for the compliments. I don't have any use for secrets. Never have. The only secrets I keep these days are ones that I have picked up from others (out of respect). I have been fortunate enough to have had some great influences but generally have learned on my own as I went. So...Open book.
 

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Wow...very nice work!

I love that stuff too, we get it in at work sometimes. If I need a rounded piece, I just wait for it to get rain outside (and get humid), then form the stuff around a bend. Let it sit in the humidity for a few hours and bring it inside. Let it sit for a day and unbind it and it holds the shape.

 

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Several layers glued and formed while still wet will keep its shape (mostly) when you let it go. Used some to build the front face of my original console.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I use the thinner of the two available thicknesses (about.060") for most of my projects. The stuff will wrap around come fairly tight corners.



When I plan on wrapping the project in vinyl, expo, or carpet I will glass the inside for structure and leave the chipboard in for a smooth surface.





A small amount of glass applied to a curved surface goes a long ways towards a very ridged, strong structure.





I make quick straight cuts on the table saw.

Note: I use a strip of 1/2" MDF against the fence so that the chipboard does not slide under the fence and take a finger off! Also I use a small piece of MDF flat down on the saw to push the chipboard through. This keeps the chipboard flat and firmly pressed down to the table.

 

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Love that center console, specially for my truck that is suffering from bass deprivation. VERY NICE WORK. Thumbs up.
 

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That is a great idea! I have been trying to find something the reshape the inside of my trunk walls without adding a lot of weight. I have been trying to use large pieces of cardboard from work and being that it is corrugated it sometimes doesn't want to cooperate.

Is an upholstery shop the only place you can get this stuff? Would a place like Hobby Lobby or Jo-ann's have it?
 

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Chip board is available from many paper distributors.
You might be able to buy small quantities off of a local print shop, if not they could tell you who the vendor/s are locally.

We get the stuff in sheets around 25" x37" or so, also can be gotten in pre cut sizes of 8.5x11" and 11X17"often.
 

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spending a lot of time at an upholstery shop in the 80's has made me do similar stuff since way back. most all of my pods have some cardboard in them at some point. i buy the 25 pack of chipboard from my local upholstery supply.

it helps keeping away from the "volcano" style looking pods, sub enclosures, etc. :)
 

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spending a lot of time at an upholstery shop in the 80's has made me do similar stuff since way back. most all of my pods have some cardboard in them at some point. i buy the 25 pack of chipboard from my local upholstery supply.

it helps keeping away from the "volcano" style looking pods, sub enclosures, etc. :)
volcano is making a comeback...I can feel it :)
 

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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
Its one of my top ten goals in life not to build volcanoes. I go way(way, way, way) out of my way to avoid it.

At the end of the day I could care less what most people think about my projects. I know that the average Joe will not understand what they are looking at and just assume that I have assembled a bunch of parts that I ordered from a catalog. My goal is to make my peers to embarrassed to ask "how the *#?** did you make that?"

I don't get that gratification often, but when I do it's sweet.

Thanks for the tip on paper suppliers crux131. I have never seen this product at any craft stores. The cool thing about being able to find it at upholstery shops is that there are upholstery shops in every town in the country.

The one limitation of chipboard is that it will only bend in one dimension at a time. Although with some creative thinking you can get very organic looking shapes (like the tops of the subwoofer enclosure in my pics).

I use a lot of foam to make my projects as well but chipboard saves me a ton of time, expense, and produces consistent results.

Just one of many tricks in my over stuffed hat.
 
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