DiyMobileAudio.com Car Stereo Forum banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
572 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was brainstorming ways to further deaden the epoxy fiberglass sub box that I'm working on for my Toyota 86 last night and came up with an idea. I apologize if this has been gone over before, but I wasn't able to find anything regarding anything like this on here. But that also leads me to believe that I'm missing something obvious that makes it a useless endeavor haha.

So this is what I'm thinking. Would making a sandwich of fiberglass and some sort of dampening or viscoelastic material have an effect on further dampening a subwoofer or a high pressure sealed box in general? The idea being to have the middle dampening layer somewhat isolate any of the internal walls vibration and flexing from the outside wall. Hopfully keeping any sort of box resonence from making it out through the walls. I was thinking about lining the inside walls with a somewhat thick layer of either cork, butyl, sorbothabe, or something similar and then laying more fiberglass on top of that.

Has anyone ever tried this method or anything similar before? I need to get a new measurement mic anyway, so I may give it a shot and take some measurements if its not a completely awful idea.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,787 Posts
I think it would be easier just to use extra layers of fiberglass and then get some deadener from skizer for the inside. Making a sandwich i think would be a waste of time.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
763 Posts
Can you please post photos of your Box.

Bracing used?
Woofer used?


You said sealed box?
Take this for what its worth, but last time I helped make one of those, we used dowels for bracing everywhere we could.

There is a metric for density of Fiberglass that needs to be used for structural or load bearing applications.

Take this for what its worth.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCSfduYtEg7kYgXjreI3mTgg
2ndshiftaudio4 years ago

Mark, great video man. I hope you don't mind me adding a few things.

I do lots of fiberglass projects. Sometimes massive builds with lots and lots of power and sometimes 70 and 80 lbs subs. In fiberglass enclosures.

... I use 3.5 oz matting where ever I can and 1.5 in those hard to get to areas as you said. A few other things.

You need to try to do all layers at one time. Don't wait for a layer to harden before you do the second and so on. Also I use 1/4" steel laminated in the layers where you use wooden dowels.

This makes the box bullet proof.

I just cut the steel into squares and stick them with hot glue as you do the wood dowels. Same method just bigger scale. Just thought your viewers might want to try that. Again not trying to steal your thunder. Just wanted to help.

Vance Dickinson in his book talked about using Sand with a filler medium inside to dampen the structure and add strength and Mass if Bracing was not an easy option to the inside, but that would change the volume of the enclosure. I would try Allthread if possible. Its cheap and can be bolted through the enclosure on both sides. It won't take up that much airspace volume, and you can add a spacer to compensate/ woofer ring for any lost air volume.

If its already set up, that's the easy way to stiffen the enclosure you made. Use large flat washers, and use Liquid Nails then fiberglass so that they make a solid bond to the inside, and then use rubber gaskets on the outside Washers with Thread locker on the bolts in the key weak locations that will experience flex.

This method can be done in less then 30 min from start to finish and is the lowest cost method for doing so I can think off. That way you don't have to rework the box.

You can countersink the bolts and washers if you use Aluminum plate on the inside if you don' have to many curve radials in the box so that they are not noticeable aesthetically and just refinish the fiberglass exterior.

That's how I would go about it if it was a complex shape/ custom box as this would be the only solution that would not effect box dimensions or internal volume all that much or rework.


Hope that helps man.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
528 Posts
I’ve been working of highend cars for over 45 years. Yes I started at a young age and my first car was a 1962 Ferrari. Great car, funny thing is the Italians use clay for sound deadening and white dispersion in their cars all the way up through the 70s we removed all the clay out of that car in the sound was so much louder inside the car because we remove the clay out of it. We took the inside of the car back part and used a red clay to fill all the voids in the sound was so much lower inside of it and was amazed by it, yes it does add quite a Weight


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top