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I currently have a 2015 Kia Soul with the following system and want to install a Dayton Audio DSP-408.

Current System:
Pioneer DEH-X8700BH Head Unit

Pioneer GM-D1004 400W 4-Channel GM Digital Series Class FD Amplifier - This is powering the following:

Front Door speakers MOREL TEMPO ULTRA 602 2-WAY COMPONENTS 6.5" &

Rear Door speakers - MOREL TEMPO ULTRA INTEGRA 602 2WAY 6.5"

Pioneer GM-D8601 Class D Mono Amplifier with Wired Bass Boost Remote - This is powering the sub Pioneer Ts-W3003d4 12"

Will the Dayton Audio DSP-408 be a good fit for my system.

How do you hook it up in the car, I can not find any pictures / manuals that show how to run the wires/cables.

Thanks!
 

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it will work fine for your situation. You provide it power, ground, remote (turn on) in, remote out, and signal in from the radio, and out to the amps. Wire the remote out of your radio into the dsp, then the remote out of the dsp to your amps.

I recommend getting power and ground from a distribution block before the amps.
 

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Reroute your existing RCA's to the DSP. Run new RCA's from DSP to amps. Reroute your existing remote line to the DSP. The DSP has a remote out. Run that to your closest amp. Daisy chain that to the other amp.
And as Skizer said, power and ground to those existing distribution blocks/points of the amps.
 

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Newbie here so be gentle if my question is dumb :rolleyes:

I'm running factory HU into Audio control LC7i, rca's into my Kenwood 801-5 amp.
I have factory 2ohm speakers and Fosgate sub. Sounds better than stock, but still looking for more quality.

Installing JL Audio c1-075 tweeters in dash here directly and replacing door speakers later this year.

Would the addition of a Dayton Audio DSP-408 be a good option for me?

Thanks
 

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You could achieve noticeable overall sound quality improvements. You would be gaining the power to control each individual channel's db, timing, x-over, and eq properties. Though tuning a DSP requires a level of knowledge, learning, and time. And time to learn the knowledge. And the tools needed, like an RTA and MIc. And patience. And respectful interest. There's a reward if you put in the effort. It's up to you if you think it's going to be worth it. If you like to tinker, tweak, and seemingly constantly seek sonic improvements, a DSP is a fun thing to mess with and you may enjoy the process and direction it takes you. If you'd rather just hurry up and listen to loud noise, with minimal effort, than a DSP isn't a great option.
 
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