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It does appear on the surface to be less preamp signal signal with only one input selected vs. two. That’s what I’m confused about. I thought the only function of the mixer was to mix, not to increase input gain. Sum channels to get a full signal.
 

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It does appear on the surface to be less preamp signal signal with only one input selected vs. two. That’s what I’m confused about. I thought the only function of the mixer was to mix, not to increase input gain. Sum channels to get a full signal.
The mixer does just mix the inputs, but if you have 2 identical inputs, the strength of the signal is double vs using just a single.

Either use an RCA splitter before feeding the sub amp, or send 2 outputs from the Dayton to the sub amp.
 

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It does appear on the surface to be less preamp signal signal with only one input selected vs. two. That’s what I’m confused about. I thought the only function of the mixer was to mix, not to increase input gain. Sum channels to get a full signal.
it doesnt have any gain perse. turned up 100% each channel will pass all the signal to the DSP. obviously less than 100% will give less signal. using a splitter is not nessecary. just set the single input to both output channels in the mixer. then use both outputs to the bass amp.

it can sum channels as well but that is not the only function.

So I’m probably clipping the amp this way. Well crap.
not likely unless it sounds clipped.
 

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When both inputs were used it appears it was actually getting more input. I ran a 50hz test tone and it was clipping at the amp per scope. Dropped to one input per channel and no clipping.
 

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When both inputs were used it appears it was actually getting more input. I ran a 50hz test tone and it was clipping at the amp per scope. Dropped to one input per channel and no clipping.
I swear the noobs give good advice

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On my pioneer nex head unit I have 2 sub outputs.

One of my amps is a 4 channel that will have the rear channels bridged for one sub.

Since I have stereo patch cables and no mono patch cables, do I connect to head units two sub outputs-two inputs on the Dayton DSP- two inputs on the amplifier? If I did this, would I have to pair two channels in the DSP for the sub output?

Or, should I buy mono patch cables for anything?


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You can connect both sub outputs to 3 and 4 inputs on DSP and the to rear channels of bridged amp if you want to retain sub control from head unit. Otherwise, you can simply assign left and right input to sub and control from the DSP.
 

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A lot of my music I mix down the low pass track to a mono track. Some music is stereo no matter the track. Even sub level signal. Still I use this practice because I use mono amps for my subwoofers. Maybe one day I might try a different class amp for a sub enclosure. However A bridged sub amp or a mono amp (single channel) is normally the standard for a sub. Unless your using a 2 or 4 channel amp for a subwoofer. Why even bother messing around with y adapters or mono patch cables? Wire it, set preamp gains and amp gains properly and Wangaway at it . Or are multi channel amps being used?
 

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A lot of my music I mix down the low pass track to a mono track. Some music is stereo no matter the track. Even sub level signal. Still I use this practice because I use mono amps for my subwoofers. Maybe one day I might try a different class amp for a sub enclosure. However A bridged sub amp or a mono amp (single channel) is normally the standard for a sub. Unless your using a 2 or 4 channel amp for a subwoofer. Why even bother messing around with y adapters or mono patch cables? Wire it, set preamp gains and amp gains properly and Wangaway at it . Or are multi channel amps being used?
Just a bridged 4 channel is being used for mid bass and subs. The other 4 channel for midrange and tweeters.

So in your opinion it’s fine to just run a stereo patch cable all the way through from head unit to DSP to amp. Just make sure to link the two sub outputs in the DSP together since they are both mono.


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On my pioneer nex head unit I have 2 sub outputs.

One of my amps is a 4 channel that will have the rear channels bridged for one sub.

Since I have stereo patch cables and no mono patch cables, do I connect to head units two sub outputs-two inputs on the Dayton DSP- two inputs on the amplifier? If I did this, would I have to pair two channels in the DSP for the sub output?

Or, should I buy mono patch cables for anything?


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No, only plug into the DSP, front and rear from the HU, keep the sub off.

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No, only plug into the DSP, front and rear from the HU, keep the sub off.

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This^^^

take the full range source. Send it to the dsp. From the dsp divvy up your outputs as needed to their corresponding channels/amps.
 

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Well, I would like some sub control from the head unit.


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You can do whatever you want. Sending the full range signal to the dsp is standard. You sending that plus the sub out is not. But does not mean it’s wrong. Personally I just use an rca Bass knob.
 

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I could use fader as sub level?


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I see, so you’re saying it’s better to let the sub have a full signal than let the head unit give it the sub out signal since it will be low passed with a slope.

Makes sense.

I think I will use the rear output on the head unit and use the fader to adjust sub level.


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I see, so you’re saying it’s better to let the sub have a full signal than let the head unit give it the sub out signal since it will be low passed with a slope.

Makes sense.

I think I will use the rear output on the head unit and use the fader to adjust sub level.


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As long as you know what you’re getting and are OK with it that’s what matters. Correct. Sub out is already a passive filtered signal. Multiple filters are not always bad but you have to know exactly what signal your sending. You have more control over the original source sending it full range to the dsp first unless you prurposely are trying to dbl up on slopes etc. One of my sub amps uses both 4th order high and low pass filters. the lowest string on the high pas on the amp is 10hz. The Dayton as far as I know does not have a filter setting below 20hz. So I’m forced to use the hp/ss filter on the amp. Same for the low pass. It’s highest setting I think is 300hz. So I’m automatically getting an 8th order filter at the low pass setting on the dsp at the amp because the butter worth filter. So if I had that already and a sub out signal on top of that for my setup it would be way more tweaking then is necessary for compensating and personally it would be a struggle because I’m looking for the least modified signal as possible Preamp.
 

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As long as you know what you’re getting and are OK with it that’s what matters. Correct. Sub out is already a passive filtered signal. Multiple filters are not always bad but you have to know exactly what signal your sending. You have more control over the original source sending it full range to the dsp first unless you prurposely are trying to dbl up on slopes etc. One of my sub amps uses both 4th order high and low pass filters. the lowest string on the high pas on the amp is 10hz. The Dayton as far as I know does not have a filter setting below 20hz. So I’m forced to use the hp/ss filter on the amp. Same for the low pass. It’s highest setting I think is 300hz. So I’m automatically getting an 8th order filter at the low pass setting on the dsp at the amp because the butter worth filter. So if I had that already and a sub out signal on top of that for my setup it would be way more tweaking then is necessary for compensating and personally it would be a struggle because I’m looking for the least modified signal as possible Preamp.
Not only is there no control of signal under 20hz, but you cannot defeat or bypass the 20hz highpass filter. Dayton squashing my hair tricks before they even get started. The best you can do is set it to 6db/octave.
 

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As long as you know what you’re getting and are OK with it that’s what matters. Correct. Sub out is already a passive filtered signal. Multiple filters are not always bad but you have to know exactly what signal your sending. You have more control over the original source sending it full range to the dsp first unless you prurposely are trying to dbl up on slopes etc. One of my sub amps uses both 4th order high and low pass filters. the lowest string on the high pas on the amp is 10hz. The Dayton as far as I know does not have a filter setting below 20hz. So I’m forced to use the hp/ss filter on the amp. Same for the low pass. It’s highest setting I think is 300hz. So I’m automatically getting an 8th order filter at the low pass setting on the dsp at the amp because the butter worth filter. So if I had that already and a sub out signal on top of that for my setup it would be way more tweaking then is necessary for compensating and personally it would be a struggle because I’m looking for the least modified signal as possible Preamp.
Thank you.


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