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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am looking at installing some cabin speakers and want to make sure this is sufficient and correct. Haven't decided on brand yet probably budget speakers but here we go.

2 1 inch tweeters with integrated crossover mounted on dash or door

2 mid range drivers 100 watt rms

2 mid bass drivers 150 watt rms

I will probably upgrade my current amp set up to accommodate these and my subs. If you have any amp suggestions that are 2000 watt rms and will last please let me know. Taramps look cheap and seem okay anyone with experience?

This is going in a 14 mazda 3.

Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Check some build logs for ideas. If you're new to this than stick to a pair of components in the front doors, sound deaden the vehicle appropriate and dont buy ****ty off brand gear.
I used dynamat on doors, trunk, ceiling. Not not on floors because of time consumption of seat removal. I am new to making a car actually sound good and component speakers sound like the way to go without breaking the bank.
With component speakers should I use an amplifier to power them?
Any suggestions as far as brand?
Also, may be a noob question but the component speakers should cover both the mid bass and mid-range hz or at least close enough?
Thanks for the info by the way.
 

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Are you planning on using passive crossovers with 2 channels of amplification or an active crossover, or ideally a DSP, and 6 channels of amplication; plus one for the subs of course?

A key concept to keep in mind is, higher frequencies above 100 dB can cause permanent hearing loss with less than 15 minutes exposure. It's going to take on the order of 10 watts for the tweeter, 20 watts for the midrange and say 50 watts for the midbass to hit 100 dB. Anything above "normal listening volumes" is callled "headroom", or more correctly called CYA.

How much CYA you need depends on the quality of gear you buy. Get yourself a nice 50w x 6 amplifier and it will do you just fine. Skimp and get a mid-grade amplifier, you might have to get one with a 100w RMS rating for it to sound as good as the 50w rated one, when playing at normal listening volumes. Get a cheap amplifier, and it may required 200w per channel RMS rating, or it may simply not be possible. Transistors suitable for high power levels aren't as clean at lower power levels as ones more closely sized to the final application.

All that being said, there are certainly people who listen to their music loud and need more than 5w/20w/50w to get the the levels they desire. We're all seeking something different, only you can determine what you're looking for...
 

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First off, you need to set a budget. You need to know what you like as far as sound. You can't just go buy speakers.
you need to be sure of the room you have.

If you want good affordable amps, look at the down4sound JP23/234 combo. they are currently on sale for a few more days. can't beat the price.
you definitely want your components amplified. then you are going to need a DSP. If you retain your stock head unit, you'll need other components to make it work.

Research is your friend. you need to go to local shops and listen to different stuff, get some ideas from others as suggested. What are you going for, loud, sound quality, both, etc.

as far as brands, there are so many opinions and options, this place will have you confused.

2 way components, the driver will be midbass/midrange, then tweeter. 3 way is midbass, midrange, tweeter. don't cheap out on your components; they are one of the most important. Placement is also crucial.
subs, you have tons of options and don't necessarily need something too expensive. I just reread and you said you don't want to break the bank. a full system isn't going to be cheap, especially with today's pricing.

I didn't want to go crazy either and I went with the Focal Flax line but I also got really good deals at the time I bought them. I'm not a fan of the typical brands like pioneer, kicker, fosgate, alpine, etc but that doesn't mean they aren't good.Every brand is only as good as your ears tell you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
First off, you need to set a budget. You need to know what you like as far as sound. You can't just go buy speakers.
you need to be sure of the room you have.

If you want good affordable amps, look at the down4sound JP23/234 combo. they are currently on sale for a few more days. can't beat the price.
you definitely want your components amplified. then you are going to need a DSP. If you retain your stock head unit, you'll need other components to make it work.

Research is your friend. you need to go to local shops and listen to different stuff, get some ideas from others as suggested. What are you going for, loud, sound quality, both, etc.

as far as brands, there are so many opinions and options, this place will have you confused.

2 way components, the driver will be midbass/midrange, then tweeter. 3 way is midbass, midrange, tweeter. don't cheap out on your components; they are one of the most important. Placement is also crucial.
subs, you have tons of options and don't necessarily need something too expensive. I just reread and you said you don't want to break the bank. a full system isn't going to be cheap, especially with today's pricing.

I didn't want to go crazy either and I went with the Focal Flax line but I also got really good deals at the time I bought them. I'm not a fan of the typical brands like pioneer, kicker, fosgate, alpine, etc but that doesn't mean they aren't good.Every brand is only as good as your ears tell you.
Yeah I guess I should have included I'm running a budget sub set up but have always had luck with mtx I'm currently running 3 mtx 12 with 750 watt mtx amp. I retained original head unit and used a ds18 line out converter. I had no working door speakers at the time and bought some cheap 3 way crunch that I didn't amplify and basically needing to find something to fill 4 door speakers at 6.5 and I can mount tweeters in the dash as there are spots for them in the dash but no factory tweeters there. I was leaning towards some dayton series component speakers for price point and have heard they are decent.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Are you planning on using passive crossovers with 2 channels of amplification or an active crossover, or ideally a DSP, and 6 channels of amplication; plus one for the subs of course?

A key concept to keep in mind is, higher frequencies above 100 dB can cause permanent hearing loss with less than 15 minutes exposure. It's going to take on the order of 10 watts for the tweeter, 20 watts for the midrange and say 50 watts for the midbass to hit 100 dB. Anything above "normal listening volumes" is callled "headroom", or more correctly called CYA.

How much CYA you need depends on the quality of gear you buy. Get yourself a nice 50w x 6 amplifier and it will do you just fine. Skimp and get a mid-grade amplifier, you might have to get one with a 100w RMS rating for it to sound as good as the 50w rated one, when playing at normal listening volumes. Get a cheap amplifier, and it may required 200w per channel RMS rating, or it may simply not be possible. Transistors suitable for high power levels aren't as clean at lower power levels as ones more closely sized to the final application.

All that being said, there are certainly people who listen to their music loud and need more than 5w/20w/50w to get the the levels they desire. We're all seeking something different, only you can determine what you're looking for...
Are you planning on using passive crossovers with 2 channels of amplification or an active crossover, or ideally a DSP, and 6 channels of amplication; plus one for the subs of course?

A key concept to keep in mind is, higher frequencies above 100 dB can cause permanent hearing loss with less than 15 minutes exposure. It's going to take on the order of 10 watts for the tweeter, 20 watts for the midrange and say 50 watts for the midbass to hit 100 dB. Anything above "normal listening volumes" is callled "headroom", or more correctly called CYA.

How much CYA you need depends on the quality of gear you buy. Get yourself a nice 50w x 6 amplifier and it will do you just fine. Skimp and get a mid-grade amplifier, you might have to get one with a 100w RMS rating for it to sound as good as the 50w rated one, when playing at normal listening volumes. Get a cheap amplifier, and it may required 200w per channel RMS rating, or it may simply not be possible. Transistors suitable for high power levels aren't as clean at lower power levels as ones more closely sized to the final application.

All that being said, there are certainly people who listen to their music loud and need more than 5w/20w/50w to get the the levels they desire. We're all seeking something different, only you can determine what you're looking for...
Are you planning on using passive crossovers with 2 channels of amplification or an active crossover, or ideally a DSP, and 6 channels of amplication; plus one for the subs of course?

A key concept to keep in mind is, higher frequencies above 100 dB can cause permanent hearing loss with less than 15 minutes exposure. It's going to take on the order of 10 watts for the tweeter, 20 watts for the midrange and say 50 watts for the midbass to hit 100 dB. Anything above "normal listening volumes" is callled "headroom", or more correctly called CYA.

How much CYA you need depends on the quality of gear you buy. Get yourself a nice 50w x 6 amplifier and it will do you just fine. Skimp and get a mid-grade amplifier, you might have to get one with a 100w RMS rating for it to sound as good as the 50w rated one, when playing at normal listening volumes. Get a cheap amplifier, and it may required 200w per channel RMS rating, or it may simply not be possible. Transistors suitable for high power levels aren't as clean at lower power levels as ones more closely sized to the final application.

All that being said, there are certainly people who listen to their music loud and need more than 5w/20w/50w to get the the levels they desire. We're all seeking something different, only you can determine what you're looking for...
Okay so from my understanding 3 way speakers are trash and not really designed for sq. What I need to do is purchase a decent full component set consisting of 2 tweeters, 2 mid range and 2 mid bass? Is it correct placement to put the two mid bass in rear doors midrange in front doors tweeters in dash? And a decent 50x6 amp which should be enough to push them? If anyone here wants to blurt out a decent amp I'm open to suggestions. I'm not seriously tight on money but can't justify 300 dollars on cabin speakers and 300 dollars on an amp to the old lady.
 

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Apologies, I was referring to a 3-way component set, not a 3-way speaker. Two-way or 3-way component set, it's really up to you and your budget. From what I'm hearing you're best off doing a 2-way with the woofer in the doors and ideally a "wideband" speaker in the dash. A "wideband" theoretically serves as both a mid and a tweeter, but never quite as well... Audio is all a series of compromises... You could also consider a quality coaxial for the dash and a midbass for the door.

Whether you use a 4-channel amp and power them separate or use a 2-channel and a passive crossover is really up to you and your budget. To power 4 door speakers, you'd want a 4-channel, either to power them in parallel off 2 channels and use the other 2 for the tweeters, or power the 2-way set with 2 channels and the other two door speakers off the other 2 channels.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Apologies, I was referring to a 3-way component set, not a 3-way speaker. Two-way or 3-way component set, it's really up to you and your budget. From what I'm hearing you're best off doing a 2-way with the woofer in the doors and ideally a "wideband" speaker in the dash. A "wideband" theoretically serves as both a mid and a tweeter, but never quite as well... Audio is all a series of compromises... You could also consider a quality coaxial for the dash and a midbass for the door.

Whether you use a 4-channel amp and power them separate or use a 2-channel and a passive crossover is really up to you and your budget. To power 4 door speakers, you'd want a 4-channel, either to power them in parallel off 2 channels and use the other 2 for the tweeters, or power the 2-way set with 2 channels and the other two door speakers off the other 2 channels.
Okay man. You have been very helpful with getting this set up and think I'm just going with the jl c1 component set it's only two tweeters and two mids but it says they'll go as low as 88 dB but I read that most are designed that way. As far as an amp goes I'm still looking...
 

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Some ideas


or start a WTB thread and see what people have stashed in their closets...
 
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