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Hey guys,

been a while since our last build log, i am still about 6 or 7 cars behind, but since we just finished this pretty unique project, i figured i would rush and get this one up for yall :)

Pretty funny thing, we are actually located around 10 mins from the main tesla factory, infact, i drive by all the time...but this P85D, came all the way from Florida. Quite a journey! :)

And yes, this is the dual drive 700HP/TQ crazy one that was released last year. lets first take a look at the car, which came with some Vossens and looks quite nice and sexy:









the interior is very unique and a Tesla signature with the giant touch screen that takes place of traditional buttons and knobs:







and yes, there is the much talked about insane mode :)



now lets get to the goals:

1. create a nice level of sound quality utilizing the oem signal source (I was able to consult with the customer before the purchase of the vehicle and we chose the base audio system for a better signal)

2. maintain a completely stealthy appearance on the inside

3. maintain as much room and stealthiness in the hatch area while having a bit of show factor

4. have a decent amount of bass performance.

before i get started, id like to thank Junior from Sound Innovations and Oliver Hague from Al & Eds for their helpful tips, as they have a lot of experiences with this car and put my mind at ease.

Joey did most of the work, while I did the wiring, Jesse pitched in as well on covering the sub enclosures. :)

lets get started.

first thing Joey did was solder and tap into the stock signal wires behind the main screen...unfortunately, this, and also doing the dash speakers, require pulling the entire front and top dash panel apart...not too bad but quite a bit of work compared to most cars:



For the front stage we went with a set of Morel Titanium Elate 603 3 way components. the MT350 tweeter went into the stock A pillar location. Joey came up with a unique way of mounting it by notching the mounting cup and allowing the morel to clip right into the stock tweeter housing, for a 100 percent oem mount:







the Morel CDM 880 midrange went into the top of the dash stock location. they are almost a perfect fit and snapped right in, and Joey applied a ring of silicone to help secure it and seal it in place:





here you see just how much work had to be undertaken to get to the sepaker locations...:)





the Morel Titanium Elate MW6 midbass went intot he stock lower door location. first, we sound proofed the metal door panel from INSIDE the door, using a combination of CLD and blackhole tile:





then the outer door card and the outside of the metal got a combo of CLD and Foam treatment to help reduce resonance and isolate the door card from the door panel:









then, Joey reinforced the stock speaker mounting baffle, whcih sets the speaker at an angle with a combination of filler and resin, and then further reinforced it with CLD damper:





then holds were tapped and threaded, and the Morel Elate midbass was bolted in place:





and the speaker housing was bolted back to the door using factory hardware:





here ist he view of the speaker with the door card back on:



i also noticed that the stock speaker grille seems to buzz a bit against the door card, so i isolated them using some foam:



the same procedure was done on the passenger side door:









 

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next comes some wiring pics.

first, after consulting Junior from SI, we decided to add an auxiliary battery to beefup the 12v system in the car. so here is the main power line we ran from the stock battery, fused, and back to the rear mounted aux battery:



it came into a stock hole in the firewall that we enlarged and grommeted:



next, the various wires were tesa taped near the connection point, ziptied every few inches to oem wiring, and ran all the way back to the hatch area:



























the rear hatch of the Model S turns out to be a major source of rattle. mostly from the swaths of plastic buzzing against the metal, so we focused a lot of attention it. first, i put in a bunch of blackhole tiles on the outter metal surface to help with resonance:





then, Jesse lined the inside of the plastic trim pieces with foam, especially at the lip where it meets the metal:













and the license plate got its share as well:

 

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So thats it for the grunt work, moving onto the main attraction: the hatch area.

as mentioned, the goal was to have a decent amount of bass, but still maintain a low key, stealthy look.

so here is what joey came up with. when open the hatch, all you see are two fiberglass side enclosure with a vinyl/mesh trim grill residing on either side of the hatch. everything else is 100 percent oem:







pop off those grilles and you can see an Audio Frog GB10 dual 2ohm subwoofer residing in each enclosure:





flip up and remove the oem floor cover, and you are greeted with a custom top trim panel that consists of carpet, vinyl, polished black acrylic and painted silver acrylic trim. there is a silver mesh in the middle opening, highlighted by a polish black acrylic tesla emblem.

you can see two mosconi AS amps stacked beneath, they are two AS200.4s, powering the front stage with 200 watts x 6 rms, and the subs with close to 1000 watts (stereo at 1ohm).

overall, the ideal is to be simple, yet classy and clean:















here is an idea on just how recessed the two side enclosures are:





and a few other shots from a little further back:







in the dark, you can actually see well into the opening becuase there are two LED strips that illuminate the amp rack:





 

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onto the build pics of the hatch area. first up is the amp/dsp rack.

first, Joey made the foundation floor baffle and set it next to a stinger SPP1700 AGM battery, making metal brackets that bolt to the side to ensure its at the proper height and orientation:





then Joey welded on metal tabs to the stinger battery box, and made a top tie down for the battery itself. this tie down also serves as a mounting point for the top floor panel:









i then carpeted the foundation floor board and mounted the first AS200.4 onto it:







the Stinger battery was then bolted in place and wired up:



and i wired up the first amp and lead wires out for the top amp, note the spacer block bolted in place for the top amp:



Joey then finished the driver side top floor bracket, and also made a pedestal for the Mosconi 6to8v8DSP:





i then went in and mounted/wired everything else. here the view of everything in place, note the pedestal mounted dsp, and the two strips of bright white LED lighting attached to the sides of the top floor support brackets:







a quick test of the led strips to confirm they are working fine:





the top floor cover panel is quite complex, first, joey made the main board using MDF:




then, using various jigs and templates, he fabricated the trim strip template and the center cutout frame:





he also fabricated the tesla T emblem by hand out of shiny black acrylic:



then the main floor board received some more layers of mdf to build it up to the approiate shape:



and the board was painted black and neodymium magnets embedded at key areas:





here is the center press fit cutout frame before after vinyl, with mesh attached, and the T emblem epoxied in place:











here are the various pieces that make up the top floor, with the trim frame transfered from mdf template to black acrylic, and the thin strip onto clear acrylic and then painted chrome silver:





here are two carpted panels that will magnetize to the panel to hide the bolts:



and finally, with all the pieces glued and snapped in, here is the finished product:







i then took the two carpeted panels off, and bolted the panel to the support beams:





and then simply snap on the two carpet pieces and we end up with what you saw earlier :)
 

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onto the subwoofer enclosure.

the Model S had some funky carpet that our usual green masking tape didnt stick to at all, so joey first lined the area to be glassed with foil tape, and then green tape:





the bottom of the floor is a piece of mdf press fit in place, and then tapped over, it is positioned to be slightly below the floor opening, so it is still easy to remove but locks itself in place once set:







then the whole area was tapped off, and several layers of glass laid down to form the back of the enclosure:











when these cured, they were removed and trimmed to the desired shape. a front baffle was attached, and tim also shaped the enclosure so the front of it curves inward to form a nice joint with the stock carpeting. and then backfilled the edges to make sure its perfectly matching the stock carpet....and forgot to take any pics of that process hahaha

but what he ended up with were these:





Jesse then took them and lined the inside with more CLD, and covered them with black carpet:





and finally, here are the press fit grills before and after vinyl, and then metal mesh attached:





so thats it for the build pics...i am sure the main questions many of you have is one, how doe it sound? and two, how much does this affect the range of the car.

on the range thing...i cant be sure, as only the owner will be able to tell with real world experience. but from my perspective, we charged the car fully when we got it in.

since then, we probably had the car turned on and off for three weeks, as each time a door is opened, brake pedal pressed, etc, the car wakes up and turns everything on. there is also around 5-6 hrs at least of solid playing...with 2 hrs or so of that being pink noise at very high volumes, and the rest of about 70 percent high level listening for tuning purposes. and all this time, i saw only about 7 or 8 miles drop from the car's displayed estimated range...if this holds true, then it bodes very well for how little this will affect the range.

also, its nice to note that the car dishes out a solid 14.2 volts or so as soon as it wakes up, and the supply is stout enough that even with this much current, we did not see a ton of lights dimming with normal music...i would say its probably more stout then a lot of car's alternators these days :)

so thats it...as for how it sounds...first up i analyzed the stock signal playing pink noise. the base system has a simple full range front and rear analog high level setup from the headunit...

here here is the analysis of that signal at various volumes on the headunit:



as you can see, its actually not too terrible, typical over emphasized bass and highs, but very little dynamic eq going on as you go up and down the volume.

of slightly more concern is the very obvious high pass filter below 40hz:



after spending some time with it on the mosconi DSP's input eq, i was able to achieve this curve, still dropping off at 40hz, but quite a bit better than stock:



so...with trepidation i started the tuning process, not sure if all the electrionics will cuase noise and how the bass will sound. but much to be delight, it was really good!

First off, the stock signal is quite clean with very little floor noise...secondly, with the hatch back design of the car, the bass was really strong, i would say the only deficiency was in the sub sonic range, below 20hz, above that, the cabin helped and there was really ample bass response from 20hz up...with the audiofrogs providing a ton of impact and exhibited great transparency.

tonally, the car is very pleasant to listen to despite using stock locations. the morels are balanced, smooth yet detailed. the midbass response of the titanium elate MW6 is always impressive.

center image is very very good, hovering right above the center speaker dash grille, a few inches above the dash. depth is also excellent, width is slightly limited due to the locations, but still pillar to pillar.

overall, this is an excellent sounding vehicle interior IMO.

working on the car has its ups and downs, but really, the only draw back i see is the fact that so much has to come apart to get to the signal and the dash speakers...the rest, the car actually pretty good to work on, and the end result really makes me happy.

so...thats it for now, i will try to catch up on some of the back log of buildlogs this week!

Cheers,

Bing
 

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Very nice!
 

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Brilliant installation- very well executed, as usual.
 

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Always wanted to know if Tesla's could handle a system. Great install as always SiS team!

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-N900A using Tapatalk
 

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That green electric screwdriver looks familiar...
 

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Oh no you didn't!!! I have always lusted for the Tesla Model S since it came out. Since I work at a semiconductor plant I would love to have one and charge it at work, never having to buy gas again. What a car and with your talent I would love to take a listen while driving.

Fantastic install and taking up zero usable space at the same time. You just can't touch the utility of this car plus it's stupid fast! I could type for hours on the details I enjoyed reading and viewing on this install. Nicely done guys.
 

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Thanks guys! This one was definitely interesting!

Just to clear my name... If you do a good job laying your fiberglass it isn't always necessary to backfill, and thus, not necessary to take a picture of that process.... 8-0

Dual fiberglass enclosures are less fun than single! That's what I take away from this...
 

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Another fantastic build guys - that car still catches my every time I see it on the road - perfect balance of class and sport.
 

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Thanks guys! This one was definitely interesting!

Just to clear my name... If you do a good job laying your fiberglass it isn't always necessary to backfill, and thus, not necessary to take a picture of that process.... 8-0

Dual fiberglass enclosures are less fun than single! That's what I take away from this...
U robbed the world of more popsicle stick porn...shame on you! Haha
 
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