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Discussion Starter #1
Extended midbass+tweet VS Extended mid range + midbass

I'm just wondering if there are any practice differences between the 2 set-ups. What advantages does each combo have (e.g. 1 might be better in different situations than the other?)

or, if they are exactly the same.

I'm asking this generally, but lets put some specifics to it as an example:

stock midbass in doors and tweeters mounted on the dash firing up into the windshield (my case!)

example setups:

Extended midbass+tweet: ER18RNX crossed high (e.g. 3k) + Seas 27TFFNCG crossed high

vs

Extended midrange + midbass: Aura whispers crossed low (e.g. 500-1k) + Peerless SLS crossed at 400 (or say AA poly 6.5 cross at 1k? - still relatively low)

Both combos fall into the 'budget' setup i think, not costing more than $200 for the whole set. But in general I think its easier to find extended midranges and a good midbass for cheaper then the 'normal' extended midbass and a normal tweet.

i know you guys are going to tell me try them both!
 

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I think in your case, I would rather have a wide band driver in the dash, to get the most vocal range range higher up. So a lower midbass, extended top end driver since they will be separated by a decent distance.

I have a similar situation. I'm going to be running DLS 8's in the door and the other driver/drivers in the dash. My plan is to keep the crossover point as low as possible for the 8's, like around 250hz or so and run from there on up in the dash. I haven't selected a driver yet, but I'm looking at various wide band/full range drivers that could work.
 

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Running your mids up to a high x-over point is useful when the mids are in the kicks and the tweet are up high in the dash or the A-Pillars and seperated from the mid by a good distance.

It's very install specific and not neccesary when the mid and tweeter are mounted close together.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
so...you two seem to be saying exactly the opposite thing?

So 89grand is saying that in my case where the mids and tweets are far apart I would get better results by using an extended mid-tweet on the dash, and keep the midbass crossed low, while Glasman is saying that when the tweets and midbasses are far apart I should cross them high.??
 

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Well maybe it's just opinions, but I'd rather keep the vocals and highs up on the dash rather than down low in the doors given the choice. And it seems that you have that choice.

Now, I'm talking about the difference between using a midbass and a wide band/fullrange vs a conventional mid and tweeter. Obviously you can not cross a tweeter very low, so this is really driver dependent.

It looks like you haven't bought a set yet, so you have the choice. If you had a conventional mid and tweeter, I'd say cross high, but you were talking about two different setups, and I maintain the midbass/wideband setup is better in an install that requires the mid to be down low, and the highs on the dash.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
If you had a conventional mid and tweeter, I'd say cross high, but you were talking about two different setups, and I maintain the midbass/wideband setup is better in an install that requires the mid to be down low, and the highs on the dash.
I can totally see how that makes sense. Which is why I'm going to reconsider my setup yet again.


Now, I'm talking about the difference between using a midbass and a wide band/fullrange vs a conventional mid and tweeter
.

And thats exactly what I was wondering - what is the trade off as compared to the conventional midbass + tweet set-up?

I guess the answer would be somewhere along the lines of 'extended midranges' won't play the highs (15khz +) as well as the traditional tweeter. And people are going to tell me whether the sonic difference between the two setups are worth the trade offs is a subjective opinion.

So that sucks, i'll just have to spend money and try them out myself : (

But. say, for a first install, would going the conventional setup be more noob friendly? easier to get better results?
 
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