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I have been looking through several of the build threads. I have noticed that a lot of people are removing the factory sound deadening from the interiors just to replace it with aftermarket sound deadening material. What is the reasoning for this? Is the factory dampening that bad that it must be removed?
 

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if it can be removed easily, remove it and replace.
 

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I've had to remove my factory deadening (the foam stuff) to install the vibration damper like Second Skin damplifier.

One lesson learned the hard way, a vibration damper is not a sound barrier. Remove the factory foam deadening and replace with vibration mat without reinstalling the factory stuff will get you more noise than stock. If you remove the factory stuff you must either reinstall it after you install the aftermarket vibration damper or use an aftermarket sound barrier like Second Skin Luxury Liner Pro as I eventually did.

If you're talking about removing just the factory vibration damper only to install an aftermarket damper, I guess because the aftermarket stuff does a better job. My car didn't have a whole lot of vibration damper so I didn't mind leaving the factory stuff in place and I put the aftermarket right over the top.
 

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I always try to reuse factory materials as long as they are in good condition and don't interfere with what I'm trying to do. If they are in bad condition remove them. This may be particularly true of asphaltic materials that have separated from the sheet metal - they're doing nothing at that point.

There's almost certainly going to be nothing gained from removing the more advanced stuff, especially the hard material that stiffens the panel. It' s very likely to have been put there to raise the panel's resonant frequency out of a troublesome range. It's entirely possible to do a lot of work, spend a lot of money and make things worse.
 

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yes that is right.
 

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Ok, so basically the factory sound deadening material is not on the same level as what the aftermarket has to offer. And if you are going to go through the effort to do the job you might as well as do it right by removing the factory material and add the new.
That really varies by vehicle. There is a huge range of quality and purpose. As a general rule of thumb it is more often wrong than right.

Think about where most factory vibration damper is - the floor where it often doubles as a marginally effective barrier. Then think about which area of the vehicle needs the least vibration damper - the floor again. I've treated many floors replacing the stock material and working around it. Unless it is really bad or in really bad shape, you aren't going to be able to hear a difference. Supplementing the barrier on the floor will improve things much more.

A corollary to that is that there's almost nothing to be gained by stacking vibration damper on top of vibration damper.
 
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