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Sorry i meant the veneer. Its failry simple to work with. Id do repairs on millwork with it a lot. Lay it on the panel. Score a mark,cut it. Glue it down. Then get the finest file you can find and file down the edges till its flush. Very easy. Just takes a little time

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Is there any concern that the adhesive will break down over time in a car environment along with the vibrations from the driver?
 

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Is there any concern that the adhesive will break down over time in a car environment along with the vibrations from the driver?
Many speaker cabinets have the veneer on them i dont see an issue with it as long as you use high quality material (glue) i mean i do repairs of veneer a lot for restroom counter tops that get wet on a daily basis. If done right it will outlast the wood

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The veneer I've done has been adhered with contact cement, there's no way that's coming apart. The flip side to that is you cannot re-position the veneer, so you need to be very careful about getting it positioned correctly, without bubbles, because once you stick it down it's going to stay.
 

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The veneer I've done has been adhered with contact cement, there's no way that's coming apart. The flip side to that is you cannot preposition the veneer, so you need to be very careful about getting it positioned correctly, without bubbles, because once you stick it down it's going to stay.
Exactly. Also starting from 1 side and working to the other with a roller like a cld roller helps get bubbles out

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Discussion Starter #85
David - I think multiple layers of thin (3mm?) ply is the way to go. Also, if you are still thinking of the plinth block with spikes, I think a thicker block (1/2"+) would look better.
For sure, but price and availability?! :eek:

Actually, it shouldn't be too bad. The box's footprint shouldn't be more than about 14x20...

The veneer I've done has been adhered with contact cement, there's no way that's coming apart. The flip side to that is you cannot re-position the veneer, so you need to be very careful about getting it positioned correctly, without bubbles, because once you stick it down it's going to stay.
Maybe I should wait to do the aluminum inlays until AFTER I lay the veneer (in order to fill flaws/bubbles with the inlay)! Lol
 

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Discussion Starter #86
Exactly. Also starting from 1 side and working to the other with a roller like a cld roller helps get bubbles out

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In my case, I will have to start from front to back as there will be a significant curve to the back of the box... But it's not a huge area to cover, so it shouldn't be too hard. I am going to get enough veneer to do a little practice and testing before I attempt the real deal. I have a CLD roller and that is a good idea. I also thought of using a rolling pin that is the width of or wider than the area I am covering to avoid any grooves or low spots from the smaller roller (I could be overthinking this whole thing, too).

 

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In my case, I will have to start from front to back as there will be a significant curve to the back of the box... But it's not a huge area to cover, so it shouldn't be too hard. I am going to get enough veneer to do a little practice and testing before I attempt the real deal. I have a CLD roller and that is a good idea. I also thought of using a rolling pin that is the width of or wider than the area I am covering to avoid any grooves or low spots from the smaller roller (I could be overthinking this whole thing, too).



You are over thinking but thats not a bad thing. Bigger is better

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OK, so maybe this idea is over the top, but thinking about crazy (I'm mean, like KA-RAYZEE) custom PC builds, you could integrate an amp into the enclosure, and liquid cool the amp by fully submerging it in mineral oil and have it back lit. Like a fish tank theme, since the sub is "Mercury", like Mercury Marine.

Of course, the sub wouldn't be submerged, there'd be a panel in the enclosure to separate the sub's air chamber from the amps oil chamber. That way the whole thing would be self-contained.

To take it a step further, the dividing panel could be made of some drift wood or some other unique wood then do the blue epoxy pour down the middle to make it look like a river. Kind of like you were taking a cross section of a river bed. From the side, you see the wood divider and amp lurking underneath in the oil (water) [is there a Loch Ness amp???]. Above is the sub floating in air.

Just thinking waaaaay outside the box.
 

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In my case, I will have to start from front to back as there will be a significant curve to the back of the box... But it's not a huge area to cover, so it shouldn't be too hard. I am going to get enough veneer to do a little practice and testing before I attempt the real deal. I have a CLD roller and that is a good idea. I also thought of using a rolling pin that is the width of or wider than the area I am covering to avoid any grooves or low spots from the smaller roller (I could be overthinking this whole thing, too).
You might could vacuum bag it
 

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Discussion Starter #90
OK, so maybe this idea is over the top, but thinking about crazy (I'm mean, like KA-RAYZEE) custom PC builds, you could integrate an amp into the enclosure, and liquid cool the amp by fully submerging it in mineral oil and have it back lit. Like a fish tank theme, since the sub is "Mercury", like Mercury Marine.

Of course, the sub wouldn't be submerged, there'd be a panel in the enclosure to separate the sub's air chamber from the amps oil chamber. That way the whole thing would be self-contained.

To take it a step further, the dividing panel could be made of some drift wood or some other unique wood then do the blue epoxy pour down the middle to make it look like a river. Kind of like you were taking a cross section of a river bed. From the side, you see the wood divider and amp lurking underneath in the oil (water) [is there a Loch Ness amp???]. Above is the sub floating in air.

Just thinking waaaaay outside the box.
Yeah man, that IS crazy! I like it a lot, but it's crazy! :laugh:

That's something for when I retire... :p
 

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Google "wood epoxy table"

You can mix automotive metallic paint or translucent candy, into the epoxy for some killer designs, from logos, to "river" effects.
An inlay, or a full panel for accent, in an acrylic box would look killer!
I played around with this idea for my subwoofer enclosure.

All of the epoxy resin I could find at my local hardware stores were only rated up to ~110 degrees F.

So I decided I don't want a pool of epoxy resin in my car haha.


edit: Also that idea ^^ is still awesome... even with the epoxy.
 

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Discussion Starter #93

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Discussion Starter #94 (Edited)
Ok, my next wild idea for this box:

Instead of bolts or screws, use threaded rods to screw in the sub that run the full length of the box! They would be inside polished aluminum tubing!

Can you picture that? 8 long, polished tubes that hold the bolts for the sub?!
 

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Haha...that is an excellent idea and would look AWESOME inside a plexi enclosure. FYI-- I use wooden dowels between the front and back panels of my ply enclosures at every sub baffle mounting point....it makes for a SERIOUSLY stiff box and since I am not looking for flash, it works fast and great!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #96
Haha...that is an excellent idea and would look AWESOME inside a plexi enclosure. FYI-- I use wooden dowels between the front and back panels of my ply enclosures at every sub baffle mounting point....it makes for a SERIOUSLY stiff box and since I am not looking for flash, it works fast and great!!!

Good point. The other thing I am thinking about is maybe using the entire acrylic end table and making the sides and bottom out of wood with the veneer. Then make everything super visible, including how the port goes into the box...

 

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Ok, my next wild idea for this box:

Instead of bolts or screw, threaded rods to screw in the sub that run the full length of the box! They would be inside polished aluminum tubing!

Can you picture that? 8 long, polished tubes that hold the bolts for the sub?!
Haha...that is an excellent idea and would look AWESOME inside a plexi enclosure. FYI-- I use wooden dowels between the front and back panels of my ply enclosures at every sub baffle mounting point....it makes for a SERIOUSLY stiff box and since I am not looking for flash, it works fast and great!!!

Elegant! I love it when beautiful form follows optimal function.
 

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Good point. The other thing I am thinking about is maybe using the entire acrylic end table and making the sides and bottom out of wood with the veneer. Then make everything super visible, including how the port goes into the box...

That sounds really nice!!! Super unique, too (I think)!
 

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Ok, my next wild idea for this box:

Instead of bolts or screws, use threaded rods to screw in the sub that run the full length of the box! They would be inside polished aluminum tubing!

Can you picture that? 8 long, polished tubes that hold the bolts for the sub?!
I would be a little leery of the threaded rod sleeved with aluminum tubing. Without a really right fit, you may induce rattles when the sub pressurizes the enclosure. Maybe even from the simple vibration of the subwoofer. Alternately you might try tapping some thick wall aluminum tubing or drilling and tapping the ends of aluminum round stock.

And if you don't mind the looks of the threads, you can also get fully threaded aluminum rods. For instance...
https://www.grainger.com/product/10P780?gclid=CjwKCAjw04vpBRB3EiwA0IieajBTxfuYzN3t5pzjOeBRrEuwr4o_rNQ6KLAStaC3_VaHfP8QgVPixhoCS-8QAvD_BwE&cm_mmc=PPC:+Google+PLA&ef_id=CjwKCAjw04vpBRB3EiwA0IieajBTxfuYzN3t5pzjOeBRrEuwr4o_rNQ6KLAStaC3_VaHfP8QgVPixhoCS-8QAvD_BwE:G:s&s_kwcid=AL!2966!3!264974130391!!!g!467374301964!
 

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Discussion Starter #100
I would be a little leery of the threaded rod sleeved with aluminum tubing. Without a really right fit, you may induce rattles when the sub pressurizes the enclosure. Maybe even from the simple vibration of the subwoofer. Alternately you might try tapping some thick wall aluminum tubing or drilling and tapping the ends of aluminum round stock.

And if you don't mind the looks of the threads, you can also get fully threaded aluminum rods. For instance...
https://www.grainger.com/product/10P780?gclid=CjwKCAjw04vpBRB3EiwA0IieajBTxfuYzN3t5pzjOeBRrEuwr4o_rNQ6KLAStaC3_VaHfP8QgVPixhoCS-8QAvD_BwE&cm_mmc=PPC:+Google+PLA&ef_id=CjwKCAjw04vpBRB3EiwA0IieajBTxfuYzN3t5pzjOeBRrEuwr4o_rNQ6KLAStaC3_VaHfP8QgVPixhoCS-8QAvD_BwE:G:s&s_kwcid=AL!2966!3!264974130391!!!g!467374301964!
Good point, and that is definitely something I considered... I would not use the aluminum sleeves themselves for any type of support (only the steel threaded rod). I would use grommets on the ends so that they are held with some pressure, but there would be no metal on metal (no aluminum sleeve touching the rod, or sub or box).

I am also thinking of only doing four of the eight bolts, because eight might look a little too busy...
 
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