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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is my first attempt at a build log... This is my first attempt at a serious build. This is all being done solo.

The build:
Front:
Hertz Dieci series DSK 165.3 components
Hertz Dieci series DCX 87.3 coaxials
Rear:
Hertz Dieci series DCX 165.3 coaxials
Subwoofers:
4 CT Sounds Tropo 10" 1.2 net cube per sub tuned to 30hz
Power:
250 amp alternator
60ah AGM under the hood
100ah AGM in rear
2/0 Big 3, fused at alt
2/0 power wire to rear, fused at battery
Amplifiers:
Taramps TS 400x4
Taramps DS 440x4
Taramps Smart 3
I'll post pictures in subsequent posts to show the progression up to this point.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
The electrical:
All of the wire was purchased from AC Wire and Supply:

This was the first time I've ever done a Big 3 and a battery swap. I thought that routing the power cable to the rear would be difficult but the grommet was easy to access from the inside. I got kinda lucky.

Here's some pictures.
The car:
Wheel Tire Car Land vehicle Vehicle
Motor vehicle Light Hood Automotive exterior Car
Automotive tire Bumper Automotive exterior Automotive wheel system Electrical wiring


I ran the cable to the rear without a problem. There's actually some kind of wire trough with plastic clips that's hidden below the passenger and drivers side carpeting.

Took a total 11 hours to do everything including the alternator swap, the battery swap, The Big Three, the grommet through the firewall and running the cable to the rear. Most of that was due to my inexperience. Came out decent but I'm sure there's room for improvement.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I ran speedwire from the front cabin to the rear trunk as well. The wire is 14 gauge and has seven individual wires of 14 gauge inside of the big wire which made it easy to run from front to rear.

The hard part was creating a second set of door looms to run two sets of the 14 gauge wire for the component system going in the doors.

I didn't get pictures but I basically had to create door looms by using the $6 ones that they sell on Amazon, threading them through a grommet of the correct size to fit the holes, and rubber cementing the grommet to the door loom. The really hard part was running the wire through the grommet and door loom and the holes that were created in door and the metal on the side of the car where the wire needed to come from.

To tell the truth I don't even KNOW how many hours it took me to figure that out but I do know that I ran out of curse words. I quickly learned that precision work and tight spaces are not friends.

It worked though. I ran the power wire down the passenger side and the speaker wire down the driver side through the same wire clips.
Hand Hood Finger Vehicle door Denim
Automotive parking light Car Vehicle Grille Hood
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Next I fabricated or tried to fabricate a place where I could put the tweeters in the plastic panel that covers the mirror electronics. I made a few mistakes and this took me a while to figure out as well.

I cut a hole in the panel using a hole saw then inserted the tweeters casing into the hole. I used glue to stick everything together. Before I put the tweeter in I sanded everything down to make it as even as possible and then coated the entire piece with 12 coats of Krylon spray paint.

As you can see it didn't come out as smooth as I intended. I'm still not quite sure why to be honest.
Sleeve Rectangle Electric blue Wood Font

I also removed the rear deck and reupholstered it in black so that it would match the new interior.

I cut out the speaker holes:

Then covered the entire deck and black grill cloth:
Wood Grey Rectangle Bumper Automotive exterior


I used gorilla glue heavy duty spray adhesive and it worked okay for the most part. There's a few places where I had to use the roller multiple times to get it to stay set and there's a couple places that I missed apparently. Overall for my first time I don't think it looks too bad.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
First ever try it sound deadener.

I'm not sure if it came out well or not. What I did was I took an entire sheet, put it on each side and filled in the rest with the pieces that I cut from the first two sheets. And then I took a third sheet and cut it into pieces as well to fill in as much as possible.
Motor vehicle Automotive tire Hood Bumper Automotive design
Motor vehicle Automotive tire Hood Road surface Automotive design
Hood Automotive tire Black Motor vehicle Bumper
Automotive tire Tire Motor vehicle Hood Automotive lighting
Automotive tire Automotive lighting Hood Motor vehicle Automotive design

Some things that I learned along the way:

1. Whatever tools you use to cut the butyl should be disposable because it's pretty difficult to get it off of anything.

2. The aluminum is sharp it'll cut you quicker than a paper cut.

3. The best way to clean it is to first take paper towels wet them and wipe up the surface dirt.
Next take a nylon disc rubber pad and some dish soap and scrub off the more difficult dirt.
After that I used a steel dish scrubbing pad the round ones and scraped as much of the difficult dirt off of there as I possibly could.
The car is 21 years old so there was a lot of dust there.
I sprayed it down with a cleaner degreaser and wiped that up with more paper towels.
Then I took additional paper towels and wiped off to make sure that there was no residue left.
The last thing that I did was scrub a microfiber towel over the entire top to make sure that all of the debris was absolutely gone.

4. It was 102° outside while I was doing the work. The Beatles was so soft kind of like almost marshmallow. It pretty much flowed into all of the nooks and crannies like with a few simple presses. So yeah the warmer outside the easier it is to work with.

5. When you start to press it down start from one corner and work diagonally to the opposite corner. There's a couple spaces where my application was off because I didn't do that and parts got scrunched together.

6. Plastic panel tools are great for pressing the butyl and aluminum into tight rings and spaces where a normal roller may not fit.

Overall it was about medium difficulty a little bit better than what I expected but still a lot of work.

Any feedback anyone would care to give?

Thank you,

Lewis King
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Continuing with sound deadening for the trunk:

I cleaned and degreased the entire trunk as well as the rear seat well. I removed all paneling the back seats and all of the carpet inside of the trunk.

Car Vehicle Hood Automotive lighting Motor vehicle
Hood Automotive tire Motor vehicle Automotive lighting Vehicle
Wood Grey Font Wall Art


Next I used the same process that I used yesterday on the rear deck on the entire back end of the car. I completely cleaned and degreased every single surface in the pictures.

I originally attempted to remove the old sound deadening material that was placed in there 21 years ago by Nissan, but it proved futile. The old material is fused to the body of the car and practically impossible to remove.

I elected to cover it with the new sound deadening material. I'm guessing that those areas will probably have a less effect but given that the rest of the bare metal is being covered completely I guessed that the net effect would still be positive.

The after pictures will be in the next post.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Here are the after pictures. I was able to get most of the bottom of the trunk done. I wanted to get all of it done but I pretty much ran out of gas.

Motor vehicle Automotive tire Automotive design Wood Auto part
Hood Fashion Automotive design Textile Musical instrument accessory
Wood Style Black-and-white Font Serveware
Building Tints and shades Tower City Symmetry


I covered as much of it as I could using whole sheets of Mat 66. That made it much easier to cover a whole lot of space in a minimal amount of time. Once I had the majority of it covered I used to spare cut pieces to fill in the empty spaces as much as possible.

I think I did pretty well for my first time. Any feedback will be appreciated.

Lewis King
 

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Looking good. You are definitely putting in the effort. Sound deadening is my least favorite part of an install. You should try resonix in your next build, I think you will be impressed after using mat66. I was, and I had been using killmat and mat66.
 
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Looking good. If you have material left, place some on the insides of the back fender you can see in your last pic, the large smooth surface. Same with the trunk lid, any flat surface you can get to put some deadener on there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Continuing with sound deadener:

Today I completed the trunk including the lid and the wheel wells and rear corner panels.

The trunk lid was the most difficult part so far. I gave up on trying to place huge pieces and pretty much went rogue. What I did was I started cutting random pieces from what I had left of partials and used that to fill in. Once I had the majority of it done then I used knock testing to identify the places where I needed to add more. There's no echo at all now

Sky Cloud Automotive tire Hood Motor vehicle

I completed the rear corner panels as well as the rear wheel wells and I put additional patching on the back of the framing for the seat cutout. I knock tested to make sure it was solid as well

Vehicle Hood Motor vehicle Automotive tire Tire
Automotive tire Motor vehicle Hood Automotive design Automotive exterior

Motor vehicle Automotive tire Hood Automotive design Automotive exterior

I started at 8:00 in the morning but by then it was already almost 85° outside by 10:00 a.m. it was pushing the good 90. I heat tested a couple pieces of Matt 66 by laying them on the hottest part of the driveway directly in the sun to see how they would react. After about an hour of direct sunlight with no shade in 85 to 90° heat they were pretty soft but they definitely were not melting like, to the touch.

So yeah I think if you leave your car in direct sunlight with no shading and no heat protection then you might make a case for it melting but most cars should be able to dissipate the heat before it gets to the material directly unless I'm mistaken. I don't ever remember the trunk of my car being extremely hot when I opened it. The cab of the car yes but the trunk is usually pretty cool even in high heat. I think good tinting and good sun shades with drastically help in the cab of the car.

Either way I'll find out soon enough. It's going to be 90 to 100 here until pretty much Thanksgiving so I'll be able to get a huge sample size.

Side note let's give a loud, rousing round of applause to global warming!

Lewis King
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Completing the rear part of the installation

Completed the sound deadening for the entire rear seating area and rear doors.

Automotive lighting Automotive tire Hood Motor vehicle Automotive design
Black Sleeve Grey Waist Automotive tire


I made several mistakes with the process for the rear doors but I'm glad that I made them so that I don't repeat them on the front doors where it is more important. The rear doors will not have speakers in them so although I'm kicking myself for making the mistakes it's okay.

Motor vehicle Automotive tire Automotive lighting Hood Tire
Automotive parking light Automotive tire Motor vehicle Automotive lighting Hood


My thought process was to take the vapor barrier and use it as a template for the sound deadening. It sounded like a good idea at the time. Turns out that it really wasn't.

Here are the issues that I ran into:

1. There are way too many moving parts, open holes and wire harnesses running through the door to be able to realistically cover the entire thing in the same way that the vapor barrier does without creating issues. It looked nice but when I put the door back together the door lock wouldn't move freely so the solenoid could not activate electronically. Even after taking it apart again and attempting to move the sound deadener to allow more freedom it's still sticking a little. I tried to compensate for my error with the second door. I was a little more successful there but not much

2. I assumed erroneously that the interior of the door is a flat plane and it isn't. So when I went to tuck everything in to the places where I needed to go, it actually shrunk the material to the point where I was unable to complete the vapor barrier idea in a single go. I had to patch in additional pieces of material to compensate.

3. I didn't realize how tight the space is on the interior of a door. My plan was to add sound deadening to the interior metal and CCF to the interior of the plastic on the opposite side to decouple both planes. Turns out that just adding a layer of sound deadener created a lot of fit issues. I had to squeeze things back together until I was able to clip the door back to the frame. I ended up having to use the two screws to really tighten everything together enough so that the clips would even latch. The good news is considering how tight everything was there's no way it should rattle.

4. After I got the doors together for the second time I realized that I'd fail to put sound deadener inside of the holes of the door so that the outside sheet metal wouldn't rattle.

Dude... Yeah that all happened. I'm obviously going to have to approach the front doors in a completely different way.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I reassembled the rear of the car including the seats, rear deck, etc. I also installed the speakers in the rear deck so they're ready to be connected to the amp.

Car Vehicle Vehicle registration plate Photograph Grille
Car Vehicle Hood Light Motor vehicle
Hood Automotive tire Automotive design Sleeve Motor vehicle
Hood Automotive design Sleeve Grille Grey


Pretty satisfied with the results. Especially considering this is the first time I've ever tried anything like this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Sound deadening the floor and front seat area:

So instead of doing the front doors I decided to take the car completely apart and pull out the carpet. I have new black carpet going in there.

Here's some before pictures it was pretty nasty under there:

World Motor vehicle Space Auto part Engineering
Car Vehicle White Motor vehicle Automotive design
Urban design Landscape Engineering Auto part Gas


Once I took the carpet out the first thing that I realized is that I needed to rerun all of the wiring to the trunk. It would have been much easier to run the wire along the floor instead of trying to fit it underneath all of the trim pieces. So I'm going to buy some more test tape wrap the wires up entirely and do exactly that before I put the new carpet in.

Here are the pictures after I completed the sound deadening:

Hood Automotive tire Motor vehicle Automotive exterior Auto part
Automotive tire Urban design Road surface City Art
Motor vehicle Hood Vehicle Urban design Landscape
White Hood Light Product Motor vehicle


I didn't cover every single surface completely but I think I got enough to significantly reduce noise from every surface.

I'm also going to cover it with a layer of CCF because I have a lot of it and I'm unable to use it inside the doors because of panel tolerances. It may or may not help but it certainly can't hurt.

If anyone has any suggestions before I replace the carpet I would really appreciate it.

Heck I would even appreciate any suggestions on how to cut the carpet to fit inside the car correctly. My current plan is to wing it and go with the flow.

Lewis King
 

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I usually use the old carpet to cut the first two holes in the middle for alignment and then cut and trim the rest in place.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Finishing the passenger side door:

Today my door adapters finally arrived so instead of putting the carpet in like I was supposed to I decided to sound deaden and mount the speakers into the passenger side door.

Here's some pictures of the Hertz mid bass compared to the factory one that came out of the door:

Window Rim Automotive tire Fixture Gas
Automotive tire Wood Tread Asphalt Bumper


I can tell that they're going to make a huge difference in the quality and the loudness of the front stage.

This time I remembered to add sound deadening to the inside sheet metal as well as the actual door frame. I didn't cover the entire door as I did with the passengers. What I actually did this time was I made sure to address any flat areas without any bends that would create vibration.

World Azure Window Automotive tire Font
Automotive tire Automotive lighting Hood Motor vehicle Vehicle
Automotive side-view mirror Car Vehicle Motor vehicle Automotive lighting


I also remembered to add sound deadening around the mounting point for the speaker adapter and the speaker gaskets to prevent unnecessary noise.

When I put the door back together and found that everything fit perfectly with no issue I was pretty stoked. It's kind of nice to see a 6 month plan begin to coalesce into the final product and have it come out super close to what your original vision was.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Completing wiring and the driver side door:

I completed the sound deadening on the driver side door and the component set fit perfectly on that side as well

Motor vehicle Automotive tire Automotive design Automotive exterior Automotive wheel system


I also ran RCA cables beneath the center console to the back of the car as well

Automotive tire Wood Art Automotive design Wall
Sleeve Automotive design Automotive tire Hood Automotive exterior
Wood Urban design Road surface Asphalt Slope
Motor vehicle Building Hood Urban design City


Once I was done I realized that I messed up pretty badly because I did not label the RCA jacks at all. But it took me 2 hours to run down as neatly as I did and to make them fit perfectly beneath the console so I'm definitely not going to undo that to figure out which one is which.

I am however very open to options as to how I can sort them out without having to redo everything over again. Right now I'm going with plug one into the receiver and test them for signal one by one.

Any better ideas?

Lewis King
 

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