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I have done a lot of reading and I keep seeing different results

starting from scratch im trying to put a system in my boat

is it true that your speakers should be less wattage then what the RMS watts is being sent to them?

example 100 watt power to speakers - speakers should be 75 watts?

im trying to run 4 speakers and a sub

thanks in advance
 

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Unless it’s different for marine, here’s my understanding from the car audio world:

It’s ok to have a higher wattage amp than speakers.... will likely mean you set gains a bit lower, which just ends up reducing risk of clipping (which is bad for speakers).

Even if you set gains accurately, many speakers can handle more than rated power (within reason) as long as there is no distortion.

Keep the signal clip free / distortion free, and be aware that the amp is more powerful (so you don’t blatantly send way too much power to the speakers), but otherwise you should be good.
 

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I'd recommend putting in larger speakers if you can, for example a 6x9 will put out more sound than 6.5 round in a boat. They used to have 7x10 they really worked nice in boats.

Wattage ratings are a recommendation, 100w speakers should work well on 100w amp channel. Most people say run more amp power to stay out of clipping, but you have to set your gains so you don't toast the speakers as well. You can't let the system go loud as it can with larger amps, but it will sound better without any clipping and probably can go louder without clipping..
 

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I have done a lot of reading and I keep seeing different results

starting from scratch im trying to put a system in my boat

is it true that your speakers should be less wattage then what the RMS watts is being sent to them?

example 100 watt power to speakers - speakers should be 75 watts?

im trying to run 4 speakers and a sub

thanks in advance
In answer to your question it doesn't matter if your amp is 10 watts or 5000 watts, the RMS rating on a speaker is about 1/2 of peak wattage and this is just a calculation to determine at what wattage the speaker starts experiencing distortion. ( Note: RMS stands for Real Music Sound )
Although this is not necessarily the level you will start hearing distortion, in fact it may be higher depending on your individual hearing level, but the peak wattage is the level that the speaker can handle before possible damage occurs. ( Note: overloading your speakers could result in damage to the head unit as well)
At any rate the amp you choose should have a output wattage equal to or greater then the speakers are rated at so that you can experience optimal fidelity at the RMS rating and also to prevent damage to the head unit by overheating the voltage regulators by creating too much current draw on them by trying to power your speakers.

I hope this helps..... Good Luck.
 

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In answer to your question it doesn't matter if your amp is 10 watts or 5000 watts, the RMS rating on a speaker is about 1/2 of peak wattage and this is just a calculation to determine at what wattage the speaker starts experiencing distortion. ( Note: RMS stands for Real Music Sound )
Although this is not necessarily the level you will start hearing distortion, in fact it may be higher depending on your individual hearing level, but the peak wattage is the level that the speaker can handle before possible damage occurs. ( Note: overloading your speakers could result in damage to the head unit as well)
At any rate the amp you choose should have a output wattage equal to or greater then the speakers are rated at so that you can experience optimal fidelity at the RMS rating and also to prevent damage to the head unit by overheating the voltage regulators by creating too much current draw on them by trying to power your speakers.

I hope this helps..... Good Luck.
RMS does not mean "real music sound" haha, it is root mean square.

RMS is not when the speaker starts experiencing distortion, it is the amount of power that a manufacture decides a speaker can handle continuously. It's based on thermal limits, and excursion limits, and is somewhat arbitrary.

An amp that is rated far below a speaker's RMS rating is perfectly fine, as long as you don't clip the signal. Keep in mind that with a single watt most speakers will be playing at about 85-95 decibels. To put that into perspective, 60 decibels is roughly conversation level, so a single watt will drive most speaker WAY louder than a typical conversation, and it is very rare to listen to a speaker at their RMS rated power level. Excessive power isn't necessary, and does not improve the fidelity of a speaker, it simply increases the SPL potential.
 
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