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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
2013 Honda Pilot. My first door panel was super hard to pop back on, I had to remove a lot of CCF.

Here's my door process:
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And I had actually put CCF all over the plastic panel as well, but ripped it all off due to my issue.

Basically, my panel was not popping back on. Forget MLV on the Pilot haha. I guess I thought the CCF would be easier to compress. I had to cut all the edges of the CCF away after that picture with the inner door just to get it on, and it was still incredibly hard-- there is 1 screw holding it, thank god because the clips felt about to burst. And even though I got the clips to pop in, there is still a roughly 1/8" gap from the panel to the metal at parts.

On my next door I will be using a knife to cut out circles of the Dynamat around the screw heads since they are hex heads not panheads, and so are kindof thick, don't need CLD on them...

The thing is, everywhere I want to apply CCF to to avoid plastic vibration, results in that region being too thick-- so like isn't that kindof counterintuitive of the purpose of CCF?

What I really came here to ask is, does anyone have a good trade trick of finding contact points in a door to "mark" your pressure points, so you don't have to put it on, cut some foam, repeat 10x until you can finally snap on the door without a ton of pressure wanting to pop it back off?
 

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What ccf is that? And I would avoid the hardie board or any wood type material and try to find some thinner plastic material for the other doors, hopefully switching screws will help a little.
 

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...I would avoid the hardie board or any wood type material and try to find some thinner plastic material for the other doors, hopefully switching screws will help a little.

"Hard board" or HDF (High Density Fiberboard) or Masonite is not waterproof and barely water resistant.
That said, it can be water proofed with any polyurethane coating.

On the other hand "Hardie board" or "Hardie Plank" is already fully water proof as it has no wood fibers in it.
It is purely a formed cementitious sheet used for tile installs or exterior siding. The only downside of using Hardie Board would be the etxra weight added to the door.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I’ll probably keep it for now, check back in a year or 2, if there’s any rot I’ll replace. Aluminum flashing and plastic sheets seemed too expensive for now. Even if there’s rot the Dynamat would still be a good seal, I’ve seen posts of people just stretching pure dynamat over their door holes
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Update: on the front doors, the holes had a big enough flange where I could mount the hole panels “inside” the recess:
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I did get panhead screws, but once I popped off the panel and found this out, old screws seem fine as they don’t stick out past the front metal.

went more conservative with the CCF, and the door popped on perfectly. But it still makes me wonder what parts of the plastic that are touching the door that need CCF and would make the panel hard to pop on, don’t have CCF on them. Guess I’ll have to play the game of putting it on, listening for rattles, fixing, repeat— hopefully there are none!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
NICE job sealing the doors !!!
Thanks! Regarding tempered hardboard I did find this:
Tempered hardboard is hardboard that has been coated with a thin film of linseed oil and then baked; this gives it more water resistance, impact resistance, hardness, rigidity and tensile strength.

so like I said we shall see how it goes lol
 
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