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Discussion Starter #42
I appreciate the offer from Nick to make the baffles (really, I do!) - but that's just not me. I like figuring this stuff out and learning how to do these things (the "DIY" part of DIYMA!). :) I specifically don't want someone else to do it - that takes the fun out of it and I learn nothing - then the next time that I need ot do something similar, I have to rely on someone else again. This isn't rocket science here - there is no reason I can't do it myself.

I don't know why everyone thinks I'm "hacking" things together (no matter what I do, I'm still going to need to attach the adapter to the speaker using screws or adhesive). I can guarantee you that the end result will not look like a hacked-together pieces of crap. The original idea was simple - cut the top part off of the stock speakers (which is the part that secures the speaker to the car) and attach it to the speakers. The end result would look like the speaker was made for the car - and would be all metal, just like the stock speakers. The top part that I cut off of the stock speaker is the "baffle" - just pre-made and made out of metal instead of plastic. When Nick mentioned a "baffle", I thought that he meant an enclosure to go around the back of the speaker (like those foam baffles they sell, but out of better materials or something). I didn't realize that he was just talking about what I'd call a "speaker adapter". A baffle/"speaker adapter" is exactly what the top part of the stock speaker is! - just made out of metal instead of plastic! I was just hoping to take advantage of the fact that I basically already had some adapters pre-made on the stock speaker, that's all (why do it all from scratch if you can re-use what already exists)? These are going to be under a stock dash piece and will never be seen - so I don't need them to look nice (although, they still would if I used the piece from the stock speaker).

However, I'm finding that the stock speaker bracket material is a little hard to work with and it didn't fit the C3CX as perfectly as expected. I do now have it so the piece fits perfectly on the speakers, but since the speaker hole was a tiny bit too small for the C3CX, I had to grind some material away to "enlarge" the hole a little - and now I feel that there isn't enough material left to drill holes through where needed in order to attach it to the C3CX properly, which is why I was considering using adhesive instead of screws. While I could easily make it work with adhesive they way it is, I've decided that I'd rather not mess with adhesive, so I'm moving to plan B and will just cut fresh pieces instead of using the part from the stock speakers. I'm not sure if I'm going to use some aluminum to make the new pieces or if I'm going to go the plastic route (cutting board material). I kind of like the idea of using metal since the metal can be a lot thinner - but it's also harder to work with.

The biggest PITA with starting from scratch is cutting the hole in the middle of the adapter that the C3CX speaker will set into. Cutting a perfect hole isn't the easiest thing to do - at least in metal, with basic tools (which again, is why I was hoping to use the top of the stock speakers - since the hole was already there).

I have all of your basic tools - power saws, jigsaws, dremel, drills, etc... But I don't build stuff like this every day. However, I like learning and I will have something done this weekend. :) I think I'm going to try the aluminum route first and then fallback to the plastic material if needed. Whatever material I use, I still need to make sure I have a proper way to attach the speaker to the material (which was the original problem). :) So it's not like I'm going to avoid having to attach two pieces together no matter which I do.

Thanks for all of the input!
 

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You are not a hack.
No duct ape was spotted.

Just think of it as a BAR with freinds. Hell I'm drinking right now. its 5;44 am.

You know what I can't do? Read a Tape measure. Something with fractions. My buddies at work once sent me a laser tool that said Fisher price on it. :) Love those guys!
 

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The plastic doesn't have to be too thick to be a solid mount. I was just using what was cheap and easily available. The hole wasn't perfect either. Just marked the center as best as I could and used a cap to trace around for my cutting line.
 

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Discussion Starter #45
The plastic doesn't have to be too thick to be a solid mount. I was just using what was cheap and easily available. The hole wasn't perfect either. Just marked the center as best as I could and used a cap to trace around for my cutting line.
I still haven't decided if I'm going to use the thin aluminum I have here at the house or some type of plastic. I had to run to Walmart this morning for some other stuff, so while I was there, I grabbed a few cutting boards - one is only about 1/8" thick, but still pretty solid - and the other is about 1/4" think and very solid. Cost me a whopping total of about $2.70 for both combined. :) I'll experiment with both the aluminum and the cutting board plastic and see which works out better. Never tried cutting this type of plastic with a dremel before - I hear "melting" can be a problem... We'll see. I can basically just trace the stock speaker "baffle" and use that as a rough guide for the overall shape. I also have something to use to create the circle shape in the middle at the perfect size - as long as I can actually cut it out successfully with my dremel or jigsaw. I'll figure something out.

I'm still amazed at how useful a dremel is. You can do so much with that single tool. I use it quite a big for lots of tasks. They even make an inexpensive (~$25) attachment to turn it into a plunge router. :) Love messing with that tool...
 

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If you have or can borrow a small jig saw its much easier imo to cut the rough shape. Used a rough grit sanding drum to finish. The faster the dremel speed the more melting. Trying to cut the plastic with the dremel will probably be more frustrating and slower than a jig saw with the right blade.
 

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Discussion Starter #47
If you have or can borrow a small jig saw its much easier imo to cut the rough shape. Used a rough grit sanding drum to finish. The faster the dremel speed the more melting. Trying to cut the plastic with the dremel will probably be more frustrating and slower than a jig saw with the right blade.
I do have a jigsaw - but not so sure i have the right blade - I think I read about special "non-melting" blades? I'll look around at what I have and experiment a little though.
 

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Discussion Starter #48
Tried the aluminum - way to hard to work with using the tools I have.

Then tried the 1/8" cutting board - WOW - so easy to work with. Had one of these made in about 15 minutes - using only a dremel (used a cutting bit to get it to approx size and then a grinding bit to shape it properly and smooth things out):




Need to drill some holes and do a little "finishing" work on it, but it was super easy. Also need to actually make sure it will fit properly too, of course.

But yeah, 88 cents and 15 minutes later... :)
 

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Looks good and will make a good solid mount.
 

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Discussion Starter #50
Looks good and will make a good solid mount.
Thanks. So stupid question... Do you just use self-tapping screws to secure the speaker to the plastic or did you use a nut and a bolt? Being that the plastic is only about 1/8" think, I'm think that I'd be better off with nuts and bolts instead of self-tapping screws (not so sure how they'd hold over time).
 

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The bolt and nut would probably be better for you. The board i used was close to 1/2 inch and these tweeters are much lighter than a small coax. Self tapping were fine for me. I actually made a tiny pilot hole to make sure there weren't any slips trying to secure the tweeters
 

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Discussion Starter #52
The bolt and nut would probably be better for you. The board i used was close to 1/2 inch and these tweeters are much lighter than a small coax. Self tapping were fine for me. I actually made a tiny pilot hole to make sure there weren't any slips trying to secure the tweeters
Ok, thanks. I agree - I think a nut and bolt would be better in my case. I just so happen to have a whole "set" of small nuts, bolts, lock washers and regular washers that will be perfect for this - so I'll go with that. Will also help to reduce the change of a "slip" and the phillips screw-driver going right through my expensive-ass coaxials. Man, would that piss me off! I've never spent anywhere near this much for ANY speaker - let alone a tiny 3" speaker.... :) Hope it's worth the time, effort and $$$...

I still need to figure out where i'm going to put the big-ass passive crossovers as well - that may actually end up being the hardest part - finding a spot for those and running the wiring up through the dash to the speaker.
 

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Under the passenger seat maybe? Don't know if that's already taken up, but usually room enough for something like crossovers while not being buried in the dash.
Dash wiring isn't usually too bad. Top down if you can manage it is easier. Doors with the molex these days sucks.
 

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Discussion Starter #54
Yeah, the space under the passenger seat is already taken with my under-seat subwoofer. :) I'm hoping I can fit the passive crossovers somewhere in the dash where you remove the dash "end caps". I don't remember how much room is in there (thinking one crossover on each side of the dash behind that "end cap" maybe). I'll find somewhere, I guess.

Thanks for all of your help - I appreciate it.
 

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Yeah, the space under the passenger seat is already taken with my under-seat subwoofer. :) I'm hoping I can fit the passive crossovers somewhere in the dash where you remove the dash "end caps". I don't remember how much room is in there (thinking one crossover on each side of the dash behind that "end cap" maybe). I'll find somewhere, I guess.

Thanks for all of your help - I appreciate it.
Looks like it’s turning out great, jtrosky. Nice work! I’m going to have to get me a dremel... I know jack shit about dremels. What do you recommend to get started and for what you found useful for a job like this?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #56
Looks like it’s turning out great, jtrosky. Nice work! I’m going to have to get me a dremel... I know jack shit about dremels. What do you recommend to get started and for what you found useful for a job like this?


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I'm far from a Dremel expert (in fact I'd say that I'm really a Dremel "noob"). However, I'll explain the basics that I know...

First, they now make both corded and cordless versions (they make MANY different models). Personally, I'd stick with a corded model as they tend to be more powerful and don't die on you in the middle of a project. Cordless tools are nice until the battery dies - or you need the extra power that a corded version provides.

I'd also stick with a "Dremel" brand. There are tons of knock-offs that will be cheaper, but I just feel that the Dremel brand is the way to go.

I have a Dremel 200 that I bought years ago. It only has 2 speeds and doesn't have the newer-style "collar" that allows for very quick bit changes. I'd probably recommend going with the Dremel 3000 if buying now:
Dremel 3000 Series 1.2 Amp Variable Speed Corded Rotary Tool Kit with 24 Accessories, 1 Attachment and Carrying Case-3000-1/24 - The Home Depot

It supports variable speed (instead of the more limited two-speed setup I have) and also has the "quick change" collar - and it's not much much more than the 200 model that I have (maybe like $15 more?).

There are TONS of different bits and attachments for these things. I just saw that they even sell an attachment that let's you cut perfect circles (would have been nice to have that for this project!). They have attachments to turn the Dremel into a plunge router and tons of other stuff - and these attachments are actually pretty inexpensive (the circle attachment is like $11 at Lowes, the plunge router attachment is like $25. There are lots of other attachments as well.

Here is a sample of the different bits available - there are bits for EVERYTHING - which is what makes these things so useful:

https://a.sellpoint.net/a/4YVdngxk.pdf

Honestly, I mainly use two bits for my uses - the 456 reinforced cutting wheels and the 8193 grinding stone. They are the main bits I use. I use them to cut different items and then "shape" them. These dremels will cut just about anything. They are so easy to use and just so effective. Highly recommended.

Let me know if you have any specific questions that I (or someone else) may be able to answer.
 

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ProTIp:
Those knock-offs (depending on "Brand") have a horrible amount of shaft play after just a few uses since many do not use a thrust bearing arrangement on the motor to deal with axial loads. After just a few uses, you will feel more vibration from the tool. Then you start going through bits as they wobble. They cut great that way so they seem to perform very well till you lose an eye, or get a part of your drill bit or disk to embed in your skin.

Just take the proper precautions. and please use gloves, and eye protection. You often see these injury's at nail salons no less in China where they do Pedicures oddly enough.
 

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You know... Dollar tree.... Their cutting boards work pretty well for for things. And I heard its only a dollar.

For those that are low on tools? You can Borrow a Router from a Local Tool shed in your neighborhood. Its free. Just Register.

To cut the shapes and make them smooth? Here is an easy way and CHEAP way to do it....
You're as bad as the OP.

Creating proper baffles is simple.

Correction: I see that the OP finally just went and bought some plastic cutting boards and discovered just how simple and cheap making a proper baffle can be.
 

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Discussion Starter #60
You're as bad as the OP.

Creating proper baffles is simple.

Correction: I see that the OP finally just went and bought some plastic cutting boards and discovered just how simple and cheap making a proper baffle can be.
Just to be clear - I planned on creating proper "baffles" from the start. The "confusion" was just because I thought that when @SkizeR said "proper baffles", that he meant something that went around the back of the speaker - like an enclosure - kind of like the foam "baffles" that they sell for speakers, just with higher-quality materials. That is what I meant by the "I'm not doing all of that!" comment.

Originally, I was just going to use a part I took from the stock speaker as my "baffle" (it would have actually been better than the plastic ones I made) - but it just didn't fit as well as I thought, and by the time I made it fit, there wasn't enough material left to drill holes where I needed to, which is why I had to make them out of plastic. The only difference is that they would have been metal if I could have used part of the stock speaker - which would have actually looked and worked better - if I could have made it work... I don't know why everyone thinks it would have been "hackish" - it would have actually been much more professional looking than the plastic ones I made...
 
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