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Discussion Starter #1
So I'm trying to trouble shoot my amplifier going into protection at loud volumes.
Its a Zed Kronos wired up to 2 RE SRX10's (dual 4 wired up at 4 ohms). I'm running zero gauge to the a distribution block and have not yet done the big 3. I've read posts about all the trouble shooting and I'm wondering if the voltage drop is the same at the amp and the battery, does that mean that the wiring is okay and its a battery or alternator issue?
 

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depends on what the drop is. the fact that the drop is the same at the battery and the amplifier means you are not losing anything in the transfer.

you are measuring the voltage drop at full rated power output right? if you measure it when the system is doing nothing, then the readings mean nothing.
 

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IMO. voltage may stay the same but, you current draw could be high. I have heard the ZED amps are bad ass and would hate to think there is something wrong with the amp. What battery and alternator configuration are you running? Furthermore, on a 4 ohm I am really having a hard time seeing a "big" current draw. Honestly, need more info. battery, alt, ground locations, how many grounds and so on.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
you are measuring the voltage drop at full rated power output right? if you measure it when the system is doing nothing, then the readings mean nothing.
I measured it with the car running and playing music, there would be voltage drops on loud bass notes dropping the voltage form 13.8down to 13 or so. I think over time, it slowly drains the battery even with the truck running
 

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ok good. just had to make sure. alot of people measure the drops with everything off and that will tell you nothing. if you are dropping almost 1 volt (maybe more if your meter could measure the instantaneous voltage) then you might have an issue. I say might, because at idle most alternators will put out 50% or so of rated current, so it is not conclusive.

doing the big 3 will certainly not hurt.
 

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If you are testing the voltage drop of the wiring then you want to measure it across the two ends of your positive wire. You'd want as close to 0v as possible.
 

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If you are testing the voltage drop of the wiring then you want to measure it across the two ends of your positive wire. You'd want as close to 0v as possible.
Sorry to be a goof but how do I do this? Put the DMM on 12v and test it on both ends of the positive wire when it is dissconnected from everything? Its this also how to test for a short in the wiring?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
if you are dropping almost 1 volt (maybe more if your meter could measure the instantaneous voltage) then you might have an issue. I say might, because at idle most alternators will put out 50% or so of rated current, so it is not conclusive.

doing the big 3 will certainly not hurt.
So this still could be a ground or wiring issue?
 

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Sorry to be a goof but how do I do this? Put the DMM on 12v and test it on both ends of the positive wire when it is dissconnected from everything? Its this also how to test for a short in the wiring?
Put one lead on the battery + and the other on the amplifier +. Doesn't matter which. The lower to 0 it reads, the better. You can do the same thing for the ground if you want. This would test the voltage drop of the wiring (and of the ground 'plane' if you do that as well). Not sure if that was exactly what you are aiming for...

Measuring the battery voltage and measuring the amp voltage and comparing them also works if (and only if) you're feeding the amplifier a test tone, though. Reason being it keeps the load on the system constant.
 
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