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Im researching these arua ns3 for a apillar install (two each side) (gotta love those titan a-pillars they are HUGE)

and I keep reading that I need to use a "baffle step compensation"

http://www.timn8er.com/Aurasound NS3.htm


this link says they used a I added baffle step compensation in the form of a .7mH inductor and 8 ohm resistor prior to the measurement.

so what exaclty does this mean and why is it neccessary? or is it only needed in ported enclosures
 

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Simply put, when you have a speaker mounted on an infinite baffle it radiates sound only in the forward direction. In the real world you don't have infinite baffles, but baffles of limited size. So at a certain point, the sound no longer radiates just in the forward direction but wraps around the speaker's enclosure/baffle as well, causing a low frequency rolloff.

To compensate for that, you devise a filter that rolls off the top end so that you can get a flat response (and killing your sensitivity as well).
 

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Re: In laymans terms can anyone explain baffle step compensa

newtitan said:
Im researching these arua ns3 for a apillar install (two each side) (gotta love those titan a-pillars they are HUGE)

and I keep reading that I need to use a "baffle step compensation"

http://www.timn8er.com/Aurasound NS3.htm


this link says they used a I added baffle step compensation in the form of a .7mH inductor and 8 ohm resistor prior to the measurement.

so what exaclty does this mean and why is it neccessary? or is it only needed in ported enclosures
usually it's only needed in the home...

basically just compensating for a rise in the midrange once a speaker is placed on a baffle...
 
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