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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys,

Decided to join the IB club. i have a 15" Dayton HF that i plan to put in my car. i see most people pointing the woofer into the cabin but was wondering if there are any con's to pointing them towards the rear. i live in MN so i'm worried about snow or rain possible dripping down and getting into the electronics. and with the space added to fit the magnet/coil, i have room to mount my amps while protecting them from snow/rain. how will this effect the sound (if at all)?
 

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It won't affect the sound at all. The sound coming from the rear of the speaker is the same as the front. With a smaller speaker there may be a slight difference because of the basket, but even then it's likely to not make an audible difference. At subwoofer frequencies there is no difference at all, install them the way that is most practical for you.
 

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It won't affect the sound at all. The sound coming from the rear of the speaker is the same as the front. With a smaller speaker there may be a slight difference because of the basket, but even then it's likely to not make an audible difference. At subwoofer frequencies there is no difference at all, install them the way that is most practical for you.
Good Point,
I never really think that the holes between the ribs on the basket would make a different with smaller speaker (since less holes area for sound to pass through)...
Thanks
 

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Not necessarily. You MAY need to invert the phase. The acoustic response is what is important, not the electrical phase.
Hi GIJoe,
May I know how do you know that you need to invert the phase from the acoustic response? is it by trying both phase and listen which one sounds better? and what sounds better here means? it is more powerful bass?
Thanks
 

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Hi GIJoe,
May I know how do you know that you need to invert the phase from the acoustic response? is it by trying both phase and listen which one sounds better? and what sounds better here means? it is more powerful bass?
Thanks

Check out this site:

Wave superposition | AS A Level Physics Revision | University of Salford

Go down to the "phase difference" animation. This is a really neat tool to show how 2 waves interfere. If they are in phase, they interfere constructively, if they are out of phase then they interfere destructively. Constructive interference will increase the output. The electrical phase (polarity) is one thing, but what matters is whether or not the waves are in phase by the time the travel to the listening position, so being in phase electrically, doesn't necessarily mean they will be in phase acoustically. We can swap wires which will change phase 180 degrees, or we can use time alignment to make much finer adjustments.

In the animation, press the red button to start the waves, then use the slider to adjust the phase angle. You'll see how being slightly in and out of phase affects the final wave.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
It won't affect the sound at all. The sound coming from the rear of the speaker is the same as the front. With a smaller speaker there may be a slight difference because of the basket, but even then it's likely to not make an audible difference. At subwoofer frequencies there is no difference at all, install them the way that is most practical for you.
Gotcha! thats what i've concluded from some things i read, thanks for confirming.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
might be a dumb question... but what phase is a speaker in free air? 180 degrees? thus the need for separation from the front and rear waves? how does the baffle change the phase difference?
 

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Check out this site:

Wave superposition | AS A Level Physics Revision | University of Salford

Go down to the "phase difference" animation. This is a really neat tool to show how 2 waves interfere. If they are in phase, they interfere constructively, if they are out of phase then they interfere destructively. Constructive interference will increase the output. The electrical phase (polarity) is one thing, but what matters is whether or not the waves are in phase by the time the travel to the listening position, so being in phase electrically, doesn't necessarily mean they will be in phase acoustically. We can swap wires which will change phase 180 degrees, or we can use time alignment to make much finer adjustments.

In the animation, press the red button to start the waves, then use the slider to adjust the phase angle. You'll see how being slightly in and out of phase affects the final wave.
Thanks for the information. :)
 
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