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Discussion Starter #1
Been trying to figure out the best way to do this. I have read tons of people complain about their 12yr water heater failing after 2 or 3 and company not honoring the warranty.

so far the ones I have looked at are about the same build and have plastic pieces instead of brass like the current one that works but it clogged for unknown reasons.

I am going to install it myself.

so is there any point in paying more if its not going to ever make it through the warranty lifespan?

from what I have been reading, old tanks were much better than the crap out these days.

I am leaning towars a 6yr tank and just keep upkeep on it. unlike the current one which I never flushed..lol
 

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Really,the only time "upkeep" is performed on a AWH is when it fails.lol
You're right about old ones being built to last,but the new ones are a lot more efficient. If you run a gas tank and never let the pilot go out,it would last decades. If it's electric,the heating elements or thermostat usually make it 8-10 years,but depending on the tank itself,might rust out in 5-6 years. I'm using a tankless,gas unit now,and after getting used to it's idiosyncrasies,ie,first faucet from the unit gets the hot water,I'll never go back,cuz nothin says nubbin like an endlessly long hot shower..
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I was looking at the Rheem tanks but I read a few pages the other night about how people had purchased the 9 or 12 yr tanks and 3yrs or less in they had failures and had to pay plumbers to come and replace parts and warranty didnt cover the issues.

also said customer service sucked.

so I am trying to find out if there is any real sense in spending the extra if the tank is never going to make it that long or if I am going to have to spend 1/3 the value on unexpected repairs just to keep it running.

I was really dissapointed to read of so many complaints on what was the once top rated tank.

when I say upkeep I am just talking about flushing out the tank. something really simple but I had never heard of it till mine started acting up.

looking at what is out there now, none of them even look as well made as the current 6yr tank that I am replacing.

more plastic, cheaper controls. ugh.
 

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Buy a Bosch tankless water heater. Mine has a 15 year warranty. Saves money from not burning the pilot and cycling constantly to maintain 40-80 gallons of water hot all the time, and heats only what is necessary.

Bosch's current top residential heater can supply 225,000 BTUs, is up to 98% efficient, and can supply a 35* rise at 12.1 GPM. If you have higher needs and/or want more capacity, you can either split the supply to the house and do kitchen/laundry on one circuit and bathrooms on another, or parallel them for increased capacity.

Residential Bosch Gas Tankless Water Heaters | Efficient Home Heating Products
 

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I would do the research to see if a tankless suits your needs and will meet your expectations. Being from the South, you don't have to heat the water as much as a Northerner does and that makes a significant difference to me. A tankless unit can only heat up the water a certain amount from the cold water supply.

I have read that the tankless units have improved a great deal since hitting the market, but I don't have much experience with them. Most of the residential sized hot water heaters that we use where I work are Manufactured by State and we have had good experience with them. There are only a few actual manufacturers of hot water heaters left.

It sounds to me like your dip tube is the problem. You should be able to have it repaired if that is the problem. Do you have really hard water where you live?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
how much do they run? I didnt want to fill in the info in order to get a quote for the Bosch at their website.

right now the budget is my concern as this was not an expected expense and I just bought tires the other day.

I dont have to do this right away as I still have hot water, I just dont have full pressure all the time.

I can install a regular tank heater myself. lol.

how many amps does a tankless pull? I have older electrical system in the house and I need to modernize my breaker panel. it still uses the old round fuses and not breakers. ouch
 

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Discussion Starter #9
hard water? I really dont know if its really hard or not actually.

besides running a test how would I know? lol. my goodness. I got to become an expert just to change tanks..lol.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I'd go tankless but I'm electric, and I need to survey the load, those things are current hogs bad.
I was looking at electric but the circuit that feeds my laundry room where the tank is already has as much on it as it can handle I "think"
 

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You can have your water tested to see how many grains hard it is. Really hard water is hard on plumbing, especially electric hot water heaters. If your water comes from a well, odds are that it is somewhat hard. I have zero experience with tankless electric hot water heaters. I have natural gas and my hot water heater was installed when the house was built nearly 15 years ago. I try to drain it and flush it one time per year. It is even more important to do this one time per year on an electric unit.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I think its a blockage on the cold water inlet. my neighbor's dad is a pro plumber and he told me what to check/do . so I think I will fix the problem this weekend.

some kind of valve in the cold water inlet side of the tank that is stuck.

my original plumber didnt specify cold or hot so I had been messing only with the hot water outlet when it is actually a cold water inlet issue.

makes sense after he discussed it with me

thanks. will update over the weekend
 

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tankless systems can leave you with very low pressure (because modern valves balance the system to the right temperature) not enough heat and the valve slows things down.
I refuse to use that shit, I also refuse to use a valve that just cranks the water on and just lets it rip only to adjust temp. A lot of times I dial it back to save water (well/septic user.)
 

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The main problem with most tanks is people fail to drain them annually. Deposits, mostly calcium, build up in the tank and cause problems. We have a 50 gal on LP gas I got at Lowe's 10 years ago and it is still doing it's job. Be sure the heater has plenty of airflow around it so the burners operate properly and are not starved for air.
 

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have you looked into the none tank versions that run on gass and heat water as it passes? very very efficiant, and much easier to work on should their be issues.
 

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Welcome to the party eviling! This was only discussed, oh.... say 5 hours ago!

Still working on turning your gaming computer into a small space heater? Maybe you can use a water-to-water heat exchanger and connect your desktop's water cooling to your home water heater and pick up some free hot water for coffee or something!
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Jax- I pm'ed you my number.... call me
I got it. I was in and out last night visiting the neighbors.

I am going to check it out this weekend or tonight maybe heck.
 

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My brother can attest to one huge efficiency flaw to the tankless hot water heaters. They never run out of hot water so people tend to stay in the shower longer...if you have teenage girls in the house consider this carefully. He replaced his gas 50 gallon tank about 10 years ago and saw a measurable and sustained increase in his fuel consumption.

Regarding warranty being worth it, yes, absolutely its worth it. But read the fine print...typically the warranty only covers the unit if it fails in a particular manner. The coils, electrodes and what have you are usually not covered or are a very short warranty while the thermal tank itself is whats actually covered by the warranty.

I've been a homeowner since the late 90's myself...hot water heaters are just about the most trouble free thing in any house I've had. Never had one give me a bit of trouble.
 
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