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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

I'm getting a subwoofer but am pretty novice when it comes to picking out the right parts so i've done some research on the topic and was wondering if this was a good setup, as I have read that, "For a subwoofer setup to sound its best it should equal or slightly exceed its RMS rating" Please recommend your own or other amp/sub setups my cost limit is $350!

Sub:
Link
Kicker 12" - 4Ohm Peak: 600W @ 300RMS

Amp:
Link

Only thing im worried about for this setup is if there will be any major problems or lack of "power" since the amp is UP to 1000W and the sub is peak 600W.
 

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Peak is ********, ignore that stuff homie. Honestly, just Google around. Or go on reddit, they probably have the answer to your question on the sidebar of carav
 

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You'll be better off in almost every case to have twice as much RMS power from your amp than what your speaker is rated for.

Just because you have X,XXX RMS Watts, that doesn't mean you need to use them all.

You'll Blow a 300watt RMS sub with a 250 watts amp turned up to high long before you'll blow that same sub up with a clean 500 watts
 

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For about $410 you can do a Fi Car audio SSD12 and a Hiphonics 1200watt ZRX1200 amp and in big ported box absolutely SLAM
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
For about $410 you can do a Fi Car audio SSD12 and a Hiphonics 1200watt ZRX1200 amp and in big ported box absolutely SLAM
Thank you but, you said the amp should have almost twice the RMS than what the sub has cause in this setup here the Amp is 1200RMS and the speaker is 1000Rms so isnt that pushing its limits?
 

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He wasn't saying you need twice the RMS. Don't over think it. You are obviously a novice here. Keep things simple. It's really not an issue of "pushing the amps limits". He was implying that people buy way too small of an amp then crank the gains to make it louder, which can lead to clipping, which can lead to damaged speakers.

The only thing you really need to worry about is finding a reliable amp with a rated RMS output around the same as the rated RMS power handling of the sub. It doesn't have to be an exact match either. If the sub is rated for 1000wRMS, then any amp in the 750w-1250w RMS range (as an example) is going to suit you just fine. Just make sure to set the gain and other settings appropriately and you are good to go.
 

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How to damage a speaker

Thermally- melting voice cool or adhesive etc

Mechanically- driving past XMech or physically damaging the driver

Thermal means you are providing more current that creates heat than the speaker can dissipate. Usually for a subwoofer this can be significantly greater than the rated recommendation by the maker. Unless of course you are simply running constant sine waves or square waves. Music should really never hurt your speaker thermally because power requirements are not constant. Add in that you are prolly never feeding your speaker the rated power of the amp due to impedance rise across the majority of frequencies.

Mechanical breakage is almost always poor implementation in the enclosure.
 
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