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So you’re into overkill? Here, here! All of my XLR cables for my microphone and preamp are Mogami Gold and I’ve used their stuff for DIY RCAs. Good stuff. And I usually go much larger than necessary and do like the OP to strip a little wire if needed to get it to fit.
So, it's "do as I say, not as I do," huh? :D

Really, why use 14 vs say 18? The size should be chosen based on length and power being used. Longer runs with more power need larger gauge wire and shorter runs with less power need less. So based on the limited information, I have no idea what you should do. If your crossover is close to your amp in the back, you might be able to actually use a smaller wire and you actually need larger wire to get to your speakers because they’re way up in the front. But in general I would think 16 gauge or even 18 gauge would be just fine for most installs.
I'm with you and Holmz in the overkill department.
 

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So you’re into overkill? Here, here! All of my XLR cables for my microphone and preamp are Mogami Gold and I’ve used their stuff for DIY RCAs. Good stuff. And I usually go much larger than necessary and do like the OP to strip a little wire if needed to get it to fit.
Well the Magami with the Neutrik ends work a charm.

Then if there is an actual box and Neutrik connecting the box to the cable.. then one can skinny the wires down for the last run to speaker tabs.

If there is some header bar that holds the Neutrik for something like an IB for mid-bass, then one can go small from there.

Mid-range also sometimes get mounted in more of an IB arrangement...

Tweeters almost never have a box, and their tabs are also sometimes delicate, so there has to be flexible wires or some method of strain relief if a large Magami 4-core is servicing a left hand side mid-range and tweeter.
 

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I think one thing to keep in mind as well. If 14 or 16 gauge is overkill. Overkill never hurt anything. Not big enough can cause anything from poor performance to fire

Sent from my LG-LS998 using Tapatalk
 

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Let’s just say that I’m following your signature and making sure the wire won’t be a bottleneck. :D
I think one thing to keep in mind as well. If 14 or 16 gauge is overkill. Overkill never hurt anything. Not big enough can cause anything from poor performance to fire
Hear! Hear!



TBH, for home stuff the only time I use 16 gauge or smaller is in very short lengths and/or on particularly delicate terminals; otherwise, 12 gauge is my go-to ...and sometimes 10 gauge.
 

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So, I have a new build coming up and don't really want to fight the door boots for midbass in doors. I'll have 190rms on tap from a bridged rd900/5 but know I probably won't even use half that real world because my bridged st-4x sq (roughly 190ish x2) was pulled WAY back in the processor on the gs690's in the Jeep. And the new build will be a single cab truck so less space to fill. Going off real world experience with signal being pulled back over 10db in the processor and music being dynamic bcae1 says I should be good up to 125rms or so with the factory 18g wire which will have 16g tapping into it behind the headunit. I only have way more power than needed so I can keep distortion to a minimum. Any reason why the factory 18g won't be sufficient knowing the gs690's can be overdriven with far less than what I have available and gain structure set accordingly to pull power back?
 

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So, I have a new build coming up and don't really want to fight the door boots for midbass in doors. I'll have 190rms on tap from a bridged rd900/5 but know I probably won't even use half that real world because my bridged st-4x sq (roughly 190ish x2) was pulled WAY back in the processor on the gs690's in the Jeep. And the new build will be a single cab truck so less space to fill. Going off real world experience with signal being pulled back over 10db in the processor and music being dynamic bcae1 says I should be good up to 125rms or so with the factory 18g wire which will have 16g tapping into it behind the headunit. I only have way more power than needed so I can keep distortion to a minimum. Any reason why the factory 18g won't be sufficient knowing the gs690's can be overdriven with far less than what I have available and gain structure set accordingly to pull power back?
If one is never clipping then the available power is clearly more than enough, and some clipping is generally seen as OK.

If the processing is pulling back the power by 10dB, then it suggests that the 190w may also becoming effectively scaled back to 19W, which seems about right. That makes me wonder if it sounds any different bridging?

I think that the only easy way to say for sure, is if you have an actual RMS or peak power number to work out whether wire size was truely good.
 

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I'll try it both ways with the JL amp bridged and unbridged. I do know that the 80-100rms per channel (depending on where you get your info) on the unbridged Zapco 5ch wasn't as dynamic as the 190ish per speaker the bridged 4ch gave. Could be dynamic peaks, lower distortion at any given volume, or I'm just a victim of phychoacoustics. Either way more power equaled more dynamics.
 

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The thing that gets me is that people use obscenely thick speaker wire and then in the crossover, the components, are nowhere near the gauge. To build a passive crossover that matches the oversized speaker cable would get bulky in a hurry and be more expensive than a good midrange and tweeter combined. Se we feed 10 gauge wire to an 18 gauge or higher low pass inductor, brilliant! The good news is that it will not harm anything other than added weight and bulk.

I'm a fan of electronic crossovers and bi or tri amping. The subs are what really matter where gauge is concerned. Most people already know that the low frequencies use the majority of the power in any system.
 

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The thing that gets me is that people use obscenely thick speaker wire and then in the crossover, the components, are nowhere near the gauge. To build a passive crossover that matches the oversized speaker cable would get bulky in a hurry and be more expensive than a good midrange and tweeter combined. Se we feed 10 gauge wire to an 18 gauge or higher low pass inductor, brilliant! The good news is that it will not harm anything other than added weight and bulk.

I'm a fan of electronic crossovers and bi or tri amping. The subs are what really matter where gauge is concerned. Most people already know that the low frequencies use the majority of the power in any system.
You can pass A LOT more current through a short piece of wire than you can a long piece of the same gauge. Just look at your fuses that you pass 100+ amps through in theory. What cracks me up are people who gripe about not being able connect 12g wire to their tweeters or small midranges. If you MUST run gigantic wire you won't hurt anything by splicing in a 16 or 18g jumper to connect to the speaker itself as long as your connections are solid. I even use 16g to sub(s) because the run is so short and never run more than 500-600rms to the sub. Have for years and the only wire I've had a problem with was cheap Walmart cca back in my basshead days.
 

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Total BS that they need to be the same gauge. Higher gauge is to achieve lower resistance. There are only two factors when it comes to wire gauge: distance and power. I would be more concerned with the quality of the wire. Always use oxygen free stranded copper wire with a thick enough shield that it will not get damaged.
 

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That is way too close to being considered audiophile mumbo jumbo that is out of control. That’s how they end up paying $1000 for cryogenic speaker cable with the same electrical characteristics of lamp cord. Or don’t get me started on cable risers for 2-channel home listeners. Ughh. :D
Actually it’s in electrical theory basics, less connections gives less chance for bad connections and resistance in a circuit, even more important in a moving car with vibration etc, so it’s far from Mumbo jumbo

Not even in the same class as cable risers and other snake oil
 

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Actually it’s in electrical theory basics, less connections gives less chance for bad connections and resistance in a circuit, even more important in a moving car with vibration etc, so it’s far from Mumbo jumbo

Not even in the same class as cable risers and other snake oil
Clearly, the point of his post was to address the highlighted bit below:

When i run subwoofer wire from amp to woofer, it has to be in one piece. I hate using any type of binding post. But when i happen to use a binding post the 2 runs of speaker wire must be cut from the same piece, and continue to go in the same direction they came off the roll. No logical reason for either, but thats just me.
 
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