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I made some "y-cable". I am taking a two channel output from my processor to a four channel amplifier that I am wiring bridged.

I used Gepco EZ wire. I soldered the two conductor wire to a four conductor wire.







 

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^Looks like things got a little ... hot ... there. :biggrinflip: Sorry, lame joke, I know. Did you tin the leads before soldering them together? If not, tinning each one prior to soldering enables you to keep the gun on there for a shorter amount of time and provides a better connection (not as in conductivity, but physically).
 

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^Looks like things got a little ... hot ... there. :biggrinflip: Sorry, lame joke, I know. Did you tin the leads before soldering them together? If not, tinning each one prior to soldering enables you to keep the gun on there for a shorter amount of time and provides a better connection (not as in conductivity, but physically).
I used the tip of my solder pen to expose the wire so I could solder to it, basic stuff. I did not cut the wire and then solder three ends together. I simply exposed the wire along the length of it then soldered a wire to it.

Do you have a better method?
 

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I used the tip of my solder pen to expose the wire so I could solder to it, basic stuff. I did not cut the wire and then solder three ends together. I simply exposed the wire along the length of it then soldered a wire to it.

Do you have a better method?
I'm afraid I'm not following. Are you meaning that you did not strip the wire prior to soldering?

Everyone has their own way doing things, the following is what I was taught:

1. Strip the wires you intend to solder the same amount.
2. Tin each wire individually.
3. If soldering to a terminal, tin the connection point as well; not to the point where there is a glob though.
4. Somehow fix the wires so that they are in the arrangement you want without having to hold them.
5. Taking the soldering iron and apply heat to where the wires join together long enough to get the solder on the tinned wires flowing.
6. This may not be necessary depending on application, but I add just a little bit more solder in step 5, but not so much that there is a glob.

The goal is to use enough solder, but not to the point that it increases the diameter of the combined wires. The less heat you have to apply to make the connection, the better. The reason being the cable housing may melt and flow between the stranded wire (if that's what's being used). If using coax, the stakes are higher as the dielectric insulator may melt. Maybe not where it is visible, but a little further down under the outer jacket and may cause the outer shield to short with the center conductor.
 

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I did not expect this to be difficult to understand. The connection method I choose is called "tap solder". I "tapped" into another wire. Instead of pealing the insulation off the tip of the wire to expose it I used my solder pen to melt the insulation to expose the wire, obviously this is done prior to soldering or tinning.

This is 22 gauge wire here, very thin stuff. I did not want to take the chance of fraying the wire and making it weak by stripping the insulation with a knife or any other method. T-Rex style strippers may work but I do not own a pair. My method worked great and the RCAs function as they should.
 

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I did not expect this to be difficult to understand. The connection method I choose is called "tap solder". I "tapped" into another wire. Instead of pealing the insulation off the tip of the wire to expose it I used my solder pen to melt the insulation to expose the wire, obviously this is done prior to soldering or tinning.

This is 22 gauge wire here, very thin stuff. I did not want to take the chance of fraying the wire and making it weak by stripping the insulation with a knife or any other method. T-Rex style strippers may work but I do not own a pair. My method worked great and the RCAs function as they should.
Fair 'nuff. I've never seen or heard of that method before; I'll have to look it up.

BTW I would never solder coax cable :)
Which you're entitled to. Nothing wrong in doing so as long as care is taken not to heat it up to much and the shield is handled properly.
 

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FWIW the insulation over the conductors is VERY heat sensitive, so much in fact that it's why I recommend simply SCORING the outer jacket and snapping it as opposed to a conventional strip method, if you so much as NICK that inner insulation it will pull back from even light to moderate heat.
 

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Anyone know someplace to get short body RCAs like the Streetwire RCAs?
I would like to make a set for my new install (when it's warm again) and I have a feeling I won't have the room in the dash,out of the HU, to use longer body type ends.
 

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I have access to this cable where i work: BT3002 Coaxial Cable 75ohm

Can this be used to make rca cables?
My concern is that the internal conductor is only 0.31 mmm.
Will this be a problem?
 

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I have access to this cable where i work: BT3002 Coaxial Cable 75ohm

Can this be used to make rca cables?
My concern is that the internal conductor is only 0.31 mmm.
Will this be a problem?
Should be fine, the 75 ohms/1000 ft is what matters. Having a solid conductor would be weird though, you'd basically have to form the cable into place in the car.
 

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that would be pretty cool thou. sucks you probably need the flexibility at some point but if you didnt it would look cool if you ever took it out and it was still in shape
 
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