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Discussion Starter #1
I'm building up my own dashboard and I have the ability to weld up enclosures for my mid range speakers and even for the sub if I wanted to (sub will be toward back seats of the center console). If I kept it from oil-canning, would there be anything wrong with that other than weight?
 

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It might ring like a bell.Depending on its Fs.
 

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I have steel enclosures in new install. I only listened to one 4" midrange, but as long as you dampen them they should sound fine.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I just checked and 14 awg (~0.080")only weighs about 0.125 lbs more per square foot than 3/4" mdf. I think this is definitely the way to go on the smaller mid range speakers since the mdf is so thick. I think ringing might be a problem with the sub, but again, I can add support where needed to keep that from happening.
 

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I just checked and 14 awg (~0.080")only weighs about 0.125 lbs more per square foot than 3/4" mdf. I think this is definitely the way to go on the smaller mid range speakers since the mdf is so thick. I think ringing might be a problem with the sub, but again, I can add support where needed to keep that from happening.
Support wouldnt really be the issue. You would need some sort of cld tile to to keep the ringing down.
 

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Aluminum is a lot less resonant.
Very true. Unfortunatly it is also more difficult, for the novice, to weld. More expensive machine (tig) and considerably more skill level to get right.

I would steer clear of using sheet steel for a sub enclosure, unless you add several layers of fiberglass, to increase rigidity. At that point you could just use the fiberglass and ditch the steel.
If you are going to go with 14 gauge, I would brace internally with 1/4" rod, unless it's a really random shape with no large flat panels. At any rate, put a CDL tile in it an cover the outside with Dynamat. Should net you more internal volume as apposed to 3/4" MDF.
Whatever route you choose, make sure you take pictures!
 

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You could also damp it with wood, for example if it has a larger flat side just attach a layer of mdf to that. Short sides I would guess are not going to be a problem. I have lined doors with or partially with wood many times with great results, and many were older cars with cheezy door panels that did have vibration/ringing issues. Or just make the large side wood and the rest metal, it really depends on how thick it is and how braced/etc. but a large flat area is going to be the worst with metal.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
-I was thinking of a series of rods extending from one side to the other, I can add as many as needed to keep the ringing down.

-I don't know what CDL tile is.

-I can only weld really thick aluminum (no TIG welder).

-It would be an odd shape, but would still have a couple of fairly largish panels.

-If I were using wood, mdf or fiberglass, I think I would skip the metal altogether. The idea was to take up less space for more volume and keep the enclosure well secured in the vehicle.
 

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There are roughly a metric ton of metal-deadening threads that refer to CLD as well as other methods. This also works too: Let me google that for you
For starts, like this thread: http://www.diymobileaudio.com/forum/diyma-sq-forum-technical-advanced/105386-how-do-you-deaden-hollow-trunk-lid.html

You just need something to deaden (reduce resonance) and mass-load (lower Fs) the metal so that it doesn't "ring" anywhere near your passband. Heck, depending on the enclosure size/shape, a bunch of NHMC might do the trick.

How much internal volume are you shooting for with these enclosures?
 

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Discussion Starter #12
There are roughly a metric ton of metal-deadening threads that refer to CLD as well as other methods. This also works too: Let me google that for you
For starts, like this thread: http://www.diymobileaudio.com/forum/diyma-sq-forum-technical-advanced/105386-how-do-you-deaden-hollow-trunk-lid.html

You just need something to deaden (reduce resonance) and mass-load (lower Fs) the metal so that it doesn't "ring" anywhere near your passband. Heck, depending on the enclosure size/shape, a bunch of NHMC might do the trick.

How much internal volume are you shooting for with these enclosures?
Yes, I am familiar with the search feature, but I would like to point out that I did not ask for you to tell me what it is, only that I didn't (currently) know what it is.

Thank you.

You could have given me help, but you have given me so much more.
 

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Very true. Unfortunatly it is also more difficult, for the novice, to weld. More expensive machine (tig) and considerably more skill level to get right
Negative, mig welds aluminum fine and if you can weld steel you can weld aluminum. Its easier using a spool gun with mig only because the wire is soft but can still be done without.

Clearly the mig needs to be set up (gas, light tension of feed rolls, oversized contact tip) but after its properly set up you can weld aluminum all day.


~JH
 

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Very true. Unfortunatly it is also more difficult, for the novice, to weld. More expensive machine (tig) and considerably more skill level to get right.
Welded Aluminum for 9 years, not much I can't do with it. Sadly, you don't live near me.

As stated above, just dampen the he!! out of it and you'll be fine.
 

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... and if you can weld steel you can weld aluminum....
Sorry, this is true and not true. Aluminum is a lot harder to LEARN, but easier to weld when you learn how. The biggest part is knowing how to read the aluminum and what it's doing, going to do. I know/work with people that can weld carbon like no other, but can't weld aluminum to save their life. The company I work for employs over 500 welders, this is the one thing I will brag about concerning myself, but I'm one of their top 3 aluminum welders.

I use to use a Fronius, push/pull configuration.

MIG / MAG Welding Equipment | Pulse Welding | Fronius

The TransPulsSynergic 5000 is what I used.
 

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Sorry, this is true and not true. Aluminum is a lot harder to LEARN, but easier to weld when you learn how. The biggest part is knowing how to read the aluminum and what it's doing, going to do.
Harder? Sure there is more going on and requires you to forget all you know of setup for 1020 (Mild is more forgiving). I do think that people get so used to welding 1020 they get in a mindset and try and apply those rules to aluminum. I am fairly confident that I could show someone with basic welding experience how to set up the rig and weld aluminum in about 30 mins and have them cranking out decent beads by the end of the day or less with MIG.

I am not disagreeing with what you said.....only that I feel its something people shouldnt be afraid of.

~jh
 

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I made this one to replace the jump seats in my Mazda,from 2"square tubing and 1/8"flat stock.Blew holes in all the inside tube walls to gain air space,and ended up with .97cf. Used birch plywood for the top and bottom.It didn't ring but was hella heavy. My current one is birch and fiberglass,about .78cf.

 

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Discussion Starter #18
Harder? Sure there is more going on and requires you to forget all you know of setup for 1020 (Mild is more forgiving). I do think that people get so used to welding 1020 they get in a mindset and try and apply those rules to aluminum. I am fairly confident that I could show someone with basic welding experience how to set up the rig and weld aluminum in about 30 mins and have them cranking out decent beads by the end of the day or less with MIG.

I am not disagreeing with what you said.....only that I feel its something people shouldnt be afraid of.

~jh
Well, I wish you'd come down here and show me. I have a Miller 251 with an aluminum gun. I bought it to weld steel on my current car and to weld aluminum on a car I want to build. I've tried to weld aluminum as thin as 1/8" and it just instantly blew holes right through it. It doesn't have pulse and the settings didn't go much lower than what I had them at.

I took welding in a class and I learned oxy/acetylene, stick, MIG and TIG welding. I did some TIG welding on aluminum. I sucked at it, so I would jump on the chance to weld thin aluminum with a MIG, even thought about buying a smaller machine for that. . . but I'm still skeptical that that is the way to go.

Either way, the discussion was really supposed to be about metal enclosures. I think I could pretty easily make an MDF enclosure, it just seem strange to do so as a center console, because the stuff is thick. Plus I live in Florida, with a lot of humidity and I just wonder how well that stuff works and how to bolt it to the hump. Big washers I assume. Welding up a box just seems natural for that area. I only have about 7" in width or so. It's a 10" sub. The car is a 1988 Corolla GTS, so it's not real big. You can read all about it at the site in my sig.

For my mid-base (6.5" speakers) , I'm definitely welding up a little enclosure. I'm even thinking about putting them on swivels so I can adjust their angles. I have some small bearings I could use.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
So is it ok to put the CDL material INSIDE the enclosure?
 
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