DiyMobileAudio.com Car Stereo Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
OK, I played around with some glass to make a stealth enclosure for my BM MKIII in the back of my Xterra. I didn't get all the bubbles out..lesson learned! I'm pretty much a perfectionist, is this gonna sound bad enough that I should start over, or outsource this to someone who knows what the hell they're doing!:) There are small bubbles galore.

Here's a pic:
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,227 Posts
I would use a grinder to get down to the good layers that are strong and then redo the fiberglass in that area. Those light spots where you can see a bubble should not be hard to remove.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
136 Posts
No offense but, you're building a sub box. I'm sure it'll be plenty strong with the little bubbles. I would be very surprised if you had any delamination issues.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,090 Posts
Yep, I agree, grind out the bubbles and lay another layer over it. Chances are if it is bubbling, you are mixing the resin too hot (too much hardener). Definitely do not start over, you can easily fix it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,665 Posts
I agree; grind it out and add more material. The problem is either with the resin/mix or you could simply be using large pieces of mat. Mat should be ripped (preferably not cut) into small pieces and built up that way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,406 Posts
honestly, I think you'd be crazy to go grinding into that...

What bubbles you DO have, aren't going to cause ANYTHING.. the bubbles themselves are completely encapsulated, everything around them is stiff, you just lightened the enclosure with AIR...

When I make glass anything that has any amount of "flat" to it, I ADD ribs, which equates to bubbles/airspace/gaps whatever you want to call it to add stiffness...




Not a problem IMHO..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,149 Posts
I would use a grinder to get down to the good layers that are strong and then redo the fiberglass in that area. Those light spots where you can see a bubble should not be hard to remove.
Yep, I agree, grind out the bubbles and lay another layer over it. Chances are if it is bubbling, you are mixing the resin too hot (too much hardener). Definitely do not start over, you can easily fix it.
All of this.. I mixed a layer too hot and ground it down, it was not that bad of a job... wear a hullava good mask and protective clothing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Not bad! My first attempt at glassing was a monstrosity. I would just put a layer or two over them without grinding, rough it up with some 60grit but imo you don't need to remove any layers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,376 Posts
I would not worry about it the layers have to delaminate or be huge enough to flex in order to be a problem. If you are that worried hit it with a hammer, try to bend and break it. Within reason you should not be able to no more than a piece of 3/4 ply. You can paint it with resin and/or lay a thin layer of glass over it to seal if you think it will leak. A roller or squeegee will keep the bubbles out unless its from over-cooking it with heat or too fast/too much hardener. I've actually cooled the resin before use if it was hot out, to give me more time. Mix in a container that does not get deep with resin for the amount you use.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,227 Posts
It's not that you have to do it, just that while you have all the stuff readily available you might as well take 20 minutes to grind it down and another 30 minutes to lay down some new layers.

As long as it is thick enough in total you have no reason to worry about bubbles if they are just in the last layer you applied. Bubbles throughout the form could be bad though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,376 Posts
I got one of those swappable flapper wheels for my 4", it works wonders on little stuff like that. The fine takes material off slower, a real help with some things. For another layer I'd use a coarse wheel on that or just DA it with a 40 grit is usually faster if it does not need to be cut down much. The flapper wheel works nice because it hangs down past the guard, so you can hold it flat to the work and get it quite smooth or flat for a grinder.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top