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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I just installed a new car audio system and everything works great aside from the tweeters being way too loud, even on their -3db setting in the crossover box. I'm a complete newb so the understanding of capacitors and resistors are beyond me. I've seen L-Pad calculators online but I don't know what the wattage is that goes to the tweeters in the component system, just that my entire component system does 100W RMS. I'm very handy with wiring things up and would have no problem doing what I gotta do, it's just a knowledge issue on what I need.

I have a Pioneer GMD9705 2000W 5Ch Amp
Polk dB 6501 6.5in component door speakers, 100W RMS
Polk MM1 842SVC 8in sub 300WRMS
4x Pioneer Pioneer TSA878 connected directly to head unit rear left and rear right wires, and not to amp. They are wired in series to be 8ohm

My door speakers are bridged in the amp and receiving 200W RMS. Gain is set very low on amp. The problem is that my tweeters produce a loud sound floor type of noise, like the kind of sound you hear if no music is on, everything is silent, but you turn your volume knob all the way up and you hear that "pshhhhhhhhhhhhhh" white noise type of sound. My tweeters simply sound like they have the volume turned all the way up, while the 6.5s do not have this problem whatsoever. If I turn the volume down, the tweeters just drown out the 6.5s because they're too loud.

My friend who works on car electronics, but not really car audio, said "I need a .1 capacitor." I don't know what this means, but I've been reading that what I actually need is an L-Pad? I don't really know what wattage is going to my tweeters out of the 100W RMS rating polk says goes into the component system altogether. I found an online L-Pad calculator but it wants the watts that go directly to the tweeter which I don't know.
I am also running the amp in bridged 3-channel mode for my door speakers.

Do I need an L-Pad? Or a .1 capacitor whatever that means? Or is there some other way to fix this issue that I don't know about?
 

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What are the headrest speakers? Anything more than 2 tweeters will be a nightmare, if you have coax speakers in the head rests, that the problem.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
What are the headrest speakers? Anything more than 2 tweeters will be a nightmare, if you have coax speakers in the head rests, that the problem.
The headrest speakers are connected straight to the head unit and not the amp. They are Pioneer TSA878 3.5in speakers with bass blockers on them. They are wired in series to be 8ohm as Rear left and Rear right wires on the head unit
 

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Ok, those have tweeters in them, so you have 6 tweeters when you only want 2. What kind of car is it that has headrest speakers? That's among the worst possible place to install a speaker.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Ok, those have tweeters in them, so you have 6 tweeters when you only want 2. What kind of car is it that has headrest speakers? That's among the worst possible place to install a speaker.
Miata. So if I disconnected those headrest speakers, are you saying my sound floor problem will go away? How are the headrest tweeters makign the door tweeters that are not connected to the amp have a loud sound floor when nothing else, including the headrest speakers have that issue?

The stock miata audio had headrest speakers, as well as tweeters in the door cards. I've just replaced the existing speakers in their original locations and added an amp and sub. The crazy priced clearwater headrest speakers and door speakers all contain tweeters as well, and nobody seems to have this issue.
 

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The headrest tweeters are contributing to the high frequencies. All of the tweeters are playing high frequencies, and if there is too much high frequency content, like you're saying, getting rid of the extra tweeters is the first step.

In a sound quality build (which a lot of us here focus on) you only want 2 tweeters in the entire car, they should be in front of you, and ideally up around head level. The headrest speakers might help with top down highway drives, but for everything else they are ruining the frequency response, and the staging, basically they are a no-no if you want good sound quality.

Regarding the noise floor, how is the amp grounded? Are any of the RCA's, or speaker wires touching metal?

With the front speakers being the problem, they are connected to passive crossovers already, right? If so, they have caps in them (that's what a crossover is), so adding your own won't help.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The headrest tweeters are contributing to the high frequencies. All of the tweeters are playing high frequencies, and if there is too much high frequency content, like you're saying, getting rid of the extra tweeters is the first step.

In a sound quality build (which a lot of us here focus on) you only want 2 tweeters in the entire car, they should be in front of you, and ideally up around head level. The headrest speakers might help with top down highway drives, but for everything else they are ruining the frequency response, and the staging, basically they are a no-no if you want good sound quality.

Regarding the noise floor, how is the amp grounded? Are any of the RCA's, or speaker wires touching metal?

With the front speakers being the problem, they are connected to passive crossovers already, right? If so, they have caps in them (that's what a crossover is), so adding your own won't help.
It's not about the high frequencies, it's about the loudness. I want a way to reduce the volume of the tweeters, and read that an L-Pad was the best way to do it. Disconnecting my headrest speakers made no difference (I just tried it) and I didn't really expect them to as other people have the same setups with the clearwater set and do not have this issue. The clearwater set has tweeters in the door speakers, as well as the headrest speakers.

My amp is direct grounded to my battery, which is in the trunk.
RCA cables are not touching any metal. And since the battery is in the trunk, they do not run against any power lines to the headunit either. My issue is specifically a volume problem, and not really an issue with highs being too high or sharp. I'm sure I'm using terms incorrectly, but by sound floor, I mean that the volume on just those door tweeters sound like the volume is way too high. The best example of what I mean is like if you turned up the volume to max on a pair of headphones, and didn't play any music, you'd hear a loud white noise sort of sound that tells you the gain is too high. Before you turn any music on and blowout your eardrums, you can hear that "pshhhhhh" noise that tells you the volume is just way too high for those headphones. Everything sounds great, it's just that those door tweeters are far too loud or overpowered or something, but not in frequency or sound, just in volume. I already have them set to -3db, I just need them a little lower. Maybe -6 or something.
 

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It's not about the high frequencies, it's about the loudness. I want a way to reduce the volume of the tweeters, and read that an L-Pad was the best way to do it. Disconnecting my headrest speakers made no difference (I just tried it) and I didn't really expect them to as other people have the same setups with the clearwater set and do not have this issue. The clearwater set has tweeters in the door speakers, as well as the headrest speakers.

My amp is direct grounded to my battery, which is in the trunk.
RCA cables are not touching any metal. And since the battery is in the trunk, they do not run against any power lines to the headunit either. My issue is specifically a volume problem, and not really an issue with highs being too high or sharp. I'm sure I'm using terms incorrectly, but by sound floor, I mean that the volume on just those door tweeters sound like the volume is way too high. The best example of what I mean is like if you turned up the volume to max on a pair of headphones, and didn't play any music, you'd hear a loud white noise sort of sound that tells you the gain is too high. Everything sounds great, it's just that those door tweeters are far too loud or overpowered or something, but not in frequency or sound, just in volume. I already have them set to -3db, I just need them a little lower. Maybe -6 or something.
With the headrest speakers disconnected (you can plug them back in after testing), does the 6.5" in the component set also play unusually loud? How are the gains on your amp set? Do the crossovers have an even lower level than you have it set to? What head unit are you using?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
With the headrest speakers disconnected (you can plug them back in after testing), does the 6.5" in the component set also play unusually loud? How are the gains on your amp set? Do the crossovers have an even lower level than you have it set to? What head unit are you using?
No, as I said in the OP it's really just only the door tweeters. They overpower (in volume, not frequency or sound) the 6.5s no matter what gain is set. The passive crossovers lowest setting is -3db, which is why I'm looking for an outside solution. Otherwise I'd just lower the setting on the passive.

The head unit is a Pioneer AVH-2500NEX. Lowering the db settings on the head unit lowers the settings of the entire component system, and not just the tweeters which is what I'm trying to do.
 

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Can you disconnect the head unit RCAs from the amp and plug in a phone with a headphone/RCA cable? This could rule out where or not the problem is coming from the head unit. Next, can you wire a pair of the headrest speakers to the channels on the amp that are currently powering the fronts? The problem could be with the amp. Otherwise, maybe you have bad passive crossovers and need to replace some resistors or replace the whole set
 

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The easiest fix is to run the amp normally and make the system active. Meaning, run the tweets on channel 1/2 and the 6.5 on channel 3/4. And now you have total control.
bridging the amp to the components gives you a lot of “power” but you getwhat you get especially if the tweets are separated from the mids. Also, just know, the way you have it set up gives the tweets a ton of power that they do not need.
unbridge the amp and use all four channels to the front stage and your problem will be resolved.
 

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The easiest fix is to run the amp normally and make the system active. Meaning, run the tweets on channel 1/2 and the 6.5 on channel 3/4. And now you have total control.
bridging the amp to the components gives you a lot of “power” but you getwhat you get especially if the tweets are separated from the mids. Also, just know, the way you have it set up gives the tweets a ton of power that they do not need.
unbridge the amp and use all four channels to the front stage and your problem will be resolved.
But first he'll need to buy an active crossover.
 

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Your right, my bad. Just went and looked and crossover section is variable but 40-500. Never used this amp just looked at specs.
But I may have missed it but what head unit is op using.

I guess it comes to a point of what’s it worth to you to fix it. I have melted several lpads through the years as most of them are only able to handle lower wattages.

but a crossover would be better than investing in lpads. In my opinion. Just my opinion.

or get a dsp. It’s crazy how many issues can be dealt with using a dsp and how cheap they have become.
 

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Your right, my bad. Just went and looked and crossover section is variable but 40-500. Never used this amp just looked at specs.
But I may have missed it but what head unit is op using.

I guess it comes to a point of what’s it worth to you to fix it. I have melted several lpads through the years as most of them are only able to handle lower wattages.

but a crossover would be better than investing in lpads. In my opinion. Just my opinion.

or get a dsp. It’s crazy how many issues can be dealt with using a dsp and how cheap they have become.
I didn't think that Pioneer had network mode, but I think you may be right that it does.
 

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If the Pioneer does in fact have Network mode, that that's the simple solution. Run the tweeters to channels 1 and 2, and mids to channels 3 and 4.
 

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rspkers, Your amplifier will not allow you to run active (tweeters and door woofers on separate amplifier channels). This is because your amp's crossover controls (photo below) will not go to a high enough frequency appropriate for your tweeters. Unfortunately, your head-unit's crossovers are in the same boat.

Joe is right about the speakers in the headrest adding to high frequencies, but you can always turn these off with your headunit fader controls, and save them for when you want to use them (top down or whatever). Also, I'll assume you are sure which speakers the hissing is coming from - the ones in the front.

Polk has designed your crossovers for general use, and it could be that your Miata's tweeters are mounted in a place where they are more audible than most, or maybe just more than you prefer. In this case, you are correct and you want to make yourself an L-Pad circuit to attenuate the tweeters more than the Polk passive crossovers already do. The things that come into play with choosing the resistors are impedence of your tweeter, and how many dB you want to attenuate the volume. The wattage only matters in choosing the right kind of resistors. You'll want the larger ceramic ones (like the ones from parts express), and then the wattage (power handling and heat dissipation of the resistors) isn't really something you need to calculate. Check the spreadsheet I posted under "resistance calculator". You'll want to actually measure the impedance (ohms) of the tweeters while not attached to the crossover.

Let me know if you need some help.

Amp photo below.
263417


I think your simpl
 

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I just saw the same thing gijoe, and I agree with the recommendation to ditch the headrest speakers, use the head unit in Network mode and run your tweeters off ofamp CH1-2, and mids off of amp CH3-4. This will provide you far more control and flexibility that futzing around with L-pads, resistors and other passive components.
 
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