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Does anyone use neoprene (1/8) sheets as a deadener? I like to source as much as I can local and this I can get. Ensolite I can't. Neoprene I can (and on the cheap). I've read it has some good deadening qualities but, as usual, I like to check with the Diy community before taking the dive. Thanks fellas.
 

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Don at SDS might have tried neoprene. I imagine he would say the same about neoprene as ensolite, that it's useful to decouple and not to block or absorb sound. I typically see neoprene used as a gasket material.
 

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I've used Neoprene cloased cell foam over dynamat lightweight, no MLV though. Made a difference? Yes. Huge? No. Only area that would say it made a big difference is the roof, still dynamated it 1st-now rain is much quieter-and that's important in the UK!
 

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I've used Neoprene cloased cell foam over dynamat lightweight, no MLV though. Made a difference? Yes. Huge? No. Only area that would say it made a big difference is the roof, still dynamated it 1st-now rain is much quieter-and that's important in the UK!
Important question is: Did you apply Dynamat first, replace the headliner, drive in the rain, apply the neoprene, replace the headliner, drive in the rain and say: Bloody hell - what a difference!"? :D Or did you do it all at once and assume both contributed to the outcome? Vibration damper would be the key treatment for impact noise like rain. CCF could make a difference if it filled the air space between the roof and headliner. Should make an imperceptible difference otherwise.

CCF should be considered a purely mechanical material. The relevant properties are sufficient compression resistance for the application and compatibility with adhesive you plan to use. One other requirement I have for in vehicle use is some resistance to burning. Drop a match on something like Volara and you'll see why.
 

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Doesn't most headliner have a backing layer of ccf already attached?
Don't know about most - I've seen everything from various foams and fabrics to hard plastic. You'd only really need CCF at the points where the headliner shell made contact with something else hard to prevent rattles unless you were looking to increase thermal insulation.
 

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Sort of getting off topic here. Decoupling a speaker from its mounting surface doesn't make any sense to me. That would be trying to have the motion generated by the speaker kept away from the mounting surface by letting the speaker move independently. Aside from the negative impact on performance, I don't know how you could accomplish this and keep the speaker in place. As has been mentioned, as soon as you bolt the speaker to the door skin / pod / or whatever the baffle is, the defeated the decoupling effort. Foam will make an airtight seal and that's a good thing. It may even introduce some vibration damping as it is compressed.

I think "mass loading" is being confused with vibration damping. You aren't going to add enough mass to drop the resonant frequency below the audible range, but you can increase it enough to reduce the baffle's reaction to the speaker's movement. Whatever vibration overcomes the inertia of the heavier baffle may need to be dealt with using vibration damping.
 

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Important question is: Did you apply Dynamat first, replace the headliner, drive in the rain, apply the neoprene, replace the headliner, drive in the rain and say: Bloody hell - what a difference!"? :D Or did you do it all at once and assume both contributed to the outcome? Vibration damper would be the key treatment for impact noise like rain. CCF could make a difference if it filled the air space between the roof and headliner. Should make an imperceptible difference otherwise.
No both were done at the same time, so any difference is the "combined" effect. The airspace between the roof lining and the dynamat is taken up by the CCF.

Overall I wouldn't bother going to such lengths deadening again-apart fom the roof and the doors I felt it was largely a waste of time/money. Maybe my quest to try and keep the weight down hindered my results-no MLV over the top of everything. If money and weight were no object I'd imagine I could get better results and would approach in a different manner. As is I spent £200 on materials-could it have been spent better elsewhere in my system? No. Could have it been spent better elsewhere-yes, should have bought some decent reference headphones with it!

CCF should be considered a purely mechanical material. The relevant properties are sufficient compression resistance for the application and compatibility with adhesive you plan to use. One other requirement I have for in vehicle use is some resistance to burning. Drop a match on something like Volara and you'll see why.
The stuff I bought was self adhesive, so pretty easy to fit and no worries about adhesives. The reason I picked neoprene over other CCFs was it's fire retardation level.
 

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The combined application is the critical point - a lot of what passes as common knowledge has its basis there. Thanks for clarifying. Filling the airspace might have helped a little, but the big difference in the sound of rain on the roof is accomplished by vibration damper.

Adhesive compatibility is really only an issue when you're trying to integrate MLV or even lead.
 

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The combined application is the critical point - a lot of what passes as common knowledge has its basis there. Thanks for clarifying. Filling the airspace might have helped a little, but the big difference in the sound of rain on the roof is accomplished by vibration damper.

Adhesive compatibility is really only an issue when you're trying to integrate MLV or even lead.
Yes, wish I could have A-b'd them, but lack of time to install knocked that nail on the head! (took a year from start to "finish"-when are we ever done?-working the odd night and weekend)
 

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Yes, wish I could have A-b'd them, but lack of time to install knocked that nail on the head! (took a year from start to "finish"-when are we ever done?-working the odd night and weekend)
Light bulb just went off. Girlfriend is from Dublin and frequently uses the phrase: "knocked that on the head". For 14 years I've been picturing her clubbing a baby seal, chipmunk or other innocent victim. Thanks for planting a more pleasant image in my head :thinking2:
 
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