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Discussion Starter #1
I to this day still do not fully understand how parallel wiring reduces the ohm load by 1/2 of the sum of total resistance between voice coils. I know that it does, but its not clear to me. Kinda how multiplying negitive numbers give a positive result. Can anyone clear this for a noob?


Or should I just accept it for what it is and move along.
 

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I'll take a stab at explaining.

Consider that amperage, which is simply the flow of electrons, is like the flow of water. Now, if you force your water through, say, a hose, the amount of water you can push through that hose in any given period of time will be limited by the size of the hose. (A fire hose can push greater amounts of water per second than a soda straw. That is a fact.)

We can now say that a smaller hose has a greater resistance to the flow of water than a bigger hose. With me so far?

Now, force the water through two hoses (it doesn't matter what size) simultaneously. The amount of water we can pass through our two hoses is doubled. It is exactly like using an equivalent bigger hose.

Electrons, like water, will flow through two parallel paths in exactly the same way; that path is now offering less resistance because there are two roads to travel and more travelers can move on it. Even though each path individually might offer, say 4 ohms of resistance to the travelers, more space is available with the two paths running parallel to each other and now it can handle double the flow, or current, or travellers, or water; pick your analogy.

Hope that helps
 

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I'll take a stab at explaining.

Consider that amperage, which is simply the flow of electrons, is like the flow of water. Now, if you force your water through, say, a hose, the amount of water you can push through that hose in any given period of time will be limited by the size of the hose. (A fire hose can push greater amounts of water per second than a soda straw. That is a fact.)

We can now say that a smaller hose has a greater resistance to the flow of water than a bigger hose. With me so far?

Now, force the water through two hoses (it doesn't matter what size) simultaneously. The amount of water we can pass through our two hoses is doubled. It is exactly like using an equivalent bigger hose.

Electrons, like water, will flow through two parallel paths in exactly the same way; that path is now offering less resistance because there are two roads to travel and more travelers can move on it. Even though each path individually might offer, say 4 ohms of resistance to the travelers, more space is available with the two paths running parallel to each other and now it can handle double the flow, or current, or travellers, or water; pick your analogy.

Hope that helps
Very well put.
 

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very well said, buchaja.

I will do the math geek thing here.

1/ (1/R1 + 1/R2 )

that is the formula for parallel resistance. if you put in some values (dont have to be the same) you will see how it works. one thing to remember with parallel resistance is that your final resistance will always be LOWER than the lowest value. (EX: 2 ohm speaker in parallel with 16 ohm speaker will be less than 2 ohms. 1.7 ohms to be exact)
 

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Following up with buchaja, think of a 'Y' shaped hose. Water comes in the inlet, and equal amounts (exactly half) of the water will cone out both sides
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the input everyone. That really does make more sense now.

1/ (1/R1 + 1/R2 )

that is the formula for parallel resistance. if you put in some values (dont have to be the same) you will see how it works. one thing to remember with parallel resistance is that your final resistance will always be LOWER than the lowest value. (EX: 2 ohm speaker in parallel with 16 ohm speaker will be less than 2 ohms. 1.7 ohms to be exact)


This is also good information. I have plans to swap out some speakers in my truck and was unsure how to figure the total resistance between speakes of diffrent resistances. I found some 8 ohm speakers and some 4 ohm speakers that I wanted to run in parallel passively with capacitors doing the crossovers.
 

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we could take this full throttle ugly and explain why each amplifier channel of a bridged amp config sees 1/2 of the nominal load too :D
 

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we could take this full throttle ugly and explain why each amplifier channel of a bridged amp config sees 1/2 of the nominal load too :D
lol. break out the whips!
 
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