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i'm not really planning on it but just out of curiousity...

so going active means getting rid of the passive crossover that typically comes with components right? so either using crossovers in the amp, HU, processor etc. but if you do this that means you have to have a channel of amplification for each driver right? so if you're doing a 3-way comps and a sub then you have to have 7 channels?? and you run tweeters straight off of an amplifier? i'd imagine even with relatively low wattage you'd blow the tweeters but i suppose that has more to do with tuning than anything else.
 

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You got that right. A channel of amplification per driver.

I have heard tweeters being powered by 100 watts and they sounded great.

Also, do a search on 'going active' on this board.
 

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jesus, that'd get crazy QUICK. although now i'm seeing why people have multiple 4 channel amps running. thanks for the search tip, i did active and just got all kinds of stuff.
 

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You got that right. A channel of amplification per driver.

I have heard tweeters being powered by 100 watts and they sounded great.

Also, do a search on 'going active' on this board.
I'll bet you $100 dollars that even though those tweeters were wired to a 100 watt channel, they were actually only using about 10-20 watts. 100 watts will power most tweeters to beyond ear piercing levels, that is up until the point when they go poof!

I have 30 watt tweeters wired to about 130 watt channels and never had a problem, given their high sensitivity they probably never see more than 20 watts with music.

The OP is correct, for an active setup you will need a channel of amplification per speaker and the crossovers to control the frequency range of each speaker. An all in one hu can give you this, or you can find it in some flexible amps, or a separate processor. The hu option is my personal favorite because you can tune from the drivers seat.
 

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gijoe, sure right about that. Those tweeters will never live through 100 watts of sine wave.

I'd say 20-30 watts on music is more than adequate. And plenty loud.
 

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i think the tweeters can take more power because it's only playing the frequencies that your active crossover is allowing it to. sorta like each tweeter or speaker is playing what they are made to play. so that helps preventing them from blowing that quick. doesn't mean they won't blow if you put alot of power into them. Tuning is what you need to play around with so you can get the speakers to play without blowing. alot to learn from audio... im still learning as well. thats why i like this forum alot. alot of helpfull people and info here.
 

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i think the tweeters can take more power because it's only playing the frequencies that your active crossover is allowing it to. sorta like each tweeter or speaker is playing what they are made to play. so that helps preventing them from blowing that quick. doesn't mean they won't blow if you put alot of power into them. Tuning is what you need to play around with so you can get the speakers to play without blowing. alot to learn from audio... im still learning as well. thats why i like this forum alot. alot of helpfull people and info here.
Well, even in a passive set the tweeters are only playing the frequencies that they're supposed to.

My point is that wattage is directly related to volume. Tweeters are typically very sensitive drivers so they get loud off of less power. A tweeter playing music full blast will only need a handful of watts. So even if the amp channel has 300 watts the tweeter will only use what it takes to get loud. If you set the gains high, or have a ton of power you can cook your tweeters, but if you're careful this won't happen within listening levels.

My 130 watt Zuki would fry my tweeters if I actually tried to get all 130 watts out. With the gains set low even high powered amps are capable of producing low wattage.
 

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well..... i understand what you are trying to say because it's about the same as what i said. BUT... doesn't mean your 30watts of power will be loud or do much to an 8ohm tweeter. there are many factors to look for and like i said. TUNING is what you need to play around with so you don't blow your speakers (tweeters also). if you set your gain too far then they can blow from distortion as well. thats why they have to be tuned. and i don't think a passive crossover play's the frequencies that the speakers are made for. it can play most but not all. if not then why people spend extra $$$ to go active? simply active you can have more settings to play around with so you get the speakers to do what you want them to.
 

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A good passive crossover should play the right frequencies. But because of mounting locations things need to be changed and a passive crossover doesn't offer the flexibility. The advantage of an active setup is to be able to adjust the crossovers and t/a independently. Just because a tweeter is "active" doesn't magically make it handle more power.

I think for the most part we agree. But when you say "TUNING" prevents blowing speakers, that statement is a little odd. Setting the crossovers properly will help prevent this, but tuning involves a lot more than just crossover points and slopes.

Distortion doesn't blow speakers. Two things destroy speakers, exceeding thermal limits and mechanical limits. Sure a clipped signal can lead to excess heat, and therefore destroy a speaker, but just saying clipping or distortion destroys speakers isn't completely accurate.

I think you'd be surprised how loud an 8ohm tweeter will get off of 30 watts.
 

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well it's my words against your words but to the end Tuning is what help expand the life of the speakers and get what you want out of them. It's funny because not much people make a 30watt rms amp for tweeters. my dynaudio tweeters took alot more than 75watts and they are not even as loud as other tweeters i heard before. There are too many things to consider to prove me or you wrong but it's just strange why everyone wants a more powerfull amp and why people choose to go active over passive. Passive is just like a base model car when active is like a fully loaded car. Both is a car that can last long but which model would you rather want?
 

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I'm getting irritated, maybe it's been too long of a week, maybe I shouldn't bother but...

Lets take my old tweeters for example http://www.parts-express.com/pdf/275-040s.pdf

These have very low sensitivity as far as tweeters are concerned. They are rated at 88.4db, this means that with only 16 watts they will reach 100.4db, 32 watts and they are at 103.4db. Take into account that this is measured at 1 meter, which is more or less how far they are from your head, and you have 103db's in a closed car. 103db's is about as loud as a lawn mower. Check the link below.

sound (physics) :: The decibel scale -- Britannica Online Encyclopedia

That's some DAMN LOUD music! Could you possibly stand the noise of a lawn mower running in your passenger seat for more than a few seconds? I think not!

Now lets take a normal tweeter, such as your dyns. They are typically rated around 91db's. At 64 watts you're looking at 109db's! That's equivalent to having a chainsaw in your lap.

Now tell me that you've heard tweeters sound good off 100 watts.
 

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well it's my words against your words but to the end Tuning is what help expand the life of the speakers and get what you want out of them. It's funny because not much people make a 30watt rms amp for tweeters. my dynaudio tweeters took alot more than 75watts and they are not even as loud as other tweeters i heard before. There are too many things to consider to prove me or you wrong but it's just strange why everyone wants a more powerfull amp and why people choose to go active over passive. Passive is just like a base model car when active is like a fully loaded car. Both is a car that can last long but which model would you rather want?
Did you actually have a clamp meter to see the actual averaged power WITH music? Thats what I thought :p

Music is dynamic and you will find that very little power is expended, especially once you get away from the lower octaves.

People don't go active for more power, they do so for flexibility. An active crossover will add phase shifts just as a passive crossover will. BUT, you can't adjust the passive crossover on the fly. If its a component set with a parallel input its even worse, because you can't control the level or time alignment for individual drivers.

Not sure where the power thing came in to play. But running active does not magically give you more power handling. It just gives you more options to explore the limits of the driver. If you are smart about it and use the appropriate documentation or measurements, you won't fry anything.

I will give you one thing though, a passive crossover can affect the over all response of a component set. But this is usually reserved for the midrange/midbass, which is prone to impedance rise. Though this can and usually is combated with zobel networks or similar tricks :)
 

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But running active does not magically give you more power handling.
In case you didn't catch it the first 2 times :)

Sorry man, I'm not trying to be an ass, but do a little research on what Fast and I have said. Music has peaks, but on average, even at high volume, your speakers aren't using nearly the wattage you think.

Take a look at those links, 109db doesn't seem like a lot when you read about the SPL guys putting up way more, but 109db is VERY loud music.

Running active has nothing to do with power handling, it has to do with flexibility.
 

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w/e i don't want to waste my time keeping up with tweeters. i know there is more people pushing more than 30watt rms to tweeters here. meter clamped on or not. every system is different. some tweeters require more power and some doesn't, it depends on the spec of that tweeter. but you can keep pushing 30watts to your tweeters if that's good enough for you.

I know running active is for flexibility. w/e you and your moody week. have fun making yourself happier = )
 

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w/e i don't want to waste my time keeping up with tweeters. i know there is more people pushing more than 30watt rms to tweeters here. meter clamped on or not. every system is different. some tweeters require more power and some doesn't, it depends on the spec of that tweeter. but you can keep pushing 30watts to your tweeters if that's good enough for you.

I know running active is for flexibility. w/e you and your moody week. have fun making yourself happier = )
You're obviously not open minded enough to learn the facts.

I have my tweeters on 130 watt channels, but as I explained earlier they aren't using anywhere near 130 watts. There are a lot of people with a lot of power on tap, but just because the channel is rated at 200 watts doesn't mean that the tweeters are ever seeing that much power.

Read through the links and learn something.
 

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Generally speaking, you can never have too much power, since you can always attenuate whatever freq range is overpowering the spectrum. Beyond that, sensitivity is just as relevant to overall output as applied wattage.
 
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