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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys,

I have found lots of good products and crap load of good brands when it comes to routers.
To name few brands that i have seen are, DeWalt, Makita, and so much more.

I have also found Jasper Circle Jig 200 & 400 Combo Pack

Which i will need for a router to get a perfect circle, I already have jigsaw.


I wont be using it that often, i will use it once in a while and maybe for little house work here and there, but other than that it will be sitting in the box. So i'm not looking for something expensive, more of inexpensive tool. I heard the jig circle from parts express brake easy but i cant find anything else online.

What do you guys use, I went to Lowes, Home Depot, Menander and non of them cant help me... so i'm looking for a help from you guys.

What kind of bit will i need to do flush mount, and also regular circles from MDF from 1/2" to 3/4" MD

Thanks in advance.


Mario
 

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I made my own copy of the Jasper jig in aluminum, personally. For a router, I personally highly recommend Bosch. Here are some instructions for cutting speaker rings that I made a while back in response to a question on another forum - it doesn't go into flush mounting. In a nutshell, to flush mount, before making the inside cutout (or before making ANY cuts, your choice, but it must be before the inside cutout) you just set the circle jig at a bigger setting than you want, but do not cut all the way through. Just go around making a groove as thick as the speaker flange. You may need to do this in 2-3 passes (of different diameters) if your router bit is small in diameter (say 1/4" but you need 1/2" for the speaker flange). I do NOT recommend a rabbeting bit. You can find ones that will work for smaller speakers, but for large flanges and/or subwoofers, you probably won't be able to.


Okay, here's a mini guide:

-You'll want a plunge router. I use and like Bosch, and I get mine from Amazon and/or Bosch Tools | Bosch Power Tools | Bosch at CPO - I have the 1617. Ideally you should get something with variable RPM
-You'll want some nice bits. Do not touch Ebay bits. A good brand is Whiteside which is available on Amazon through a third-party, most of them are around $20-25/bit. You can go to your local home improvement store and buy Bosch or Porter Cable bits if you want something a little bit cheaper that's still good. Get 1/4" bits - smaller bits make less of a mess and if you decide to get a Jasper circle jig, it is calibrated for 1/4" bits.
-If you're doing plywood, you want spiral bits, preferably downcut. Upcut bits can give you chip out, so I recommend masking tape around the cut, at the very least.
-If you're doing MDF, you want either MDF-specific bits or spiral downcut bits. Wearing a mask is extra important if you're cutting MDF
-If you're doing HDPE, you can use the regular straight bits that are normally used for wood, but I recommend that you get the Whiteside plastic cutting bit on Amazon. If you use the regular straight cut bits then go over your surface two or three times because plastic melts and gets messy. If your router is variable speed, then turn it down to something kinda low.
-Always wear eye and ear protection. A mask is also a necessity for MDF. It is recommended for other wood and not really necessary for plastic since plastic throws chips, not dust.
-Clamps! I recommend a couple of heavy duty bar clamps and some spring clamps. For box building, btw, you should also get some corner clamps.
-You will probably want some sort of circle jig such as the Jasper 200, unless you want to just use a piece of wood attached to your router. I have done this... screw it down to the base plate and I just nail up into it. You can use a dial caliper to get a reasonably decent measurement of the radius of the cut, but it's still going to be less precise, at least until you get used to it. It takes more time, so decide if $30-40 on a jig is worth it to you.


Here's what you do:

-Clamp the piece down over a scrap piece of wood, and to your work surface. Try to keep the clamps away from where the router/jig will be, but for smaller pieces, you will need to move the clamps around as you go.

-If using the Jasper jig, drill a 1/8" hole in the center of the piece and insert the guide pin and then position the jig (attached to the router) appropriately. If using a piece of wood screwed to the router, use a nail coming up through the scrap piece, then through the center of your piece to cut, and then into the piece that's attached to the router. Set it up for the OUTSIDE diameter first! This is important!

-Again, set up for the OUTSIDE diameter, make sure your router will turn freely in the jig (be it your own or Jasper). If using your own jig and a nail, make sure that it's even - you can tap it down some more with the hammer if need be. Make sure there's no side-to-side play.

-Plunge through and go around... If your material is thick then do it in multiple passes, adding depth each time. If you're using plastic then go around 2-3 times to clear any plastic that melted. Make sure your piece is always clamped down in at least one point, even if just by a spring clamp. (Use your best judgement here)

-When done with the outside diameter, reset your jig for the inside diameter. This time, make sure that the ring portion of the piece is well clamped. Or you can even screw it into the scrap piece under it, and clamp that piece to the table. Just make sure you don't leave a screw hole where you don't want it if you do that. I don't use the screws - just clamps. If the clamps come loose, your ring will be loose when you finish, and it could screw the ring up. Be very careful when you are just about finished cutting out the inside portion. If your jig is not supported by the scrap piece of wood that I mentioned then it could come loose right at the end and ruin the piece.

Another note: for plastic speaker rings, ALL holes MUST be pre-drilled. For wood, you only generally need to pre-drill for relatively large screw sizes and/or if you are close to the edge of the wood. If you want to play it safe then just pre-drill all holes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you very much, any recommendation which bosh router should i go with?
 

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DRagonrage hit all the inmportant points and I'll just add this....The JAsper is nice when it's new.....

But once you put it to use the hole wear out and the pins don't stay in place.

This is the reason why I'll never buy one of those again.

I prefer a circle guide that has a sliding adjustment.

And those Bosch 1617 units are very nice.

I've been using a Porter Cable 690 motor for the past 14 years but that Bosch is on my wish list.
 

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I could always provide some aluminum jigs... ;) price won't be $54, though. Give me the ease of use of a jig any day. I've made jigs using just scrap wood. It's a pain in the ass.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Guys thank you all for all the help. I really need to buy one, and pick one up soon...

Anything specific as far as brand of a router goes? I know they could go over 300$, I will use that router once in a while, for home and car audio or even home audio builds
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Guys thank you all for all the help. I really need to buy one, and pick one up soon...

Anything specific as far as brand of a router goes? I know they could go over 300$, I will use that router once in a while, for home and car audio or even home audio builds
 

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It's pretty much what I linked, DeWalt, or Porter Cable. Those 3 seem to have the biggest followings. I stand by the Bosch recommendation I gave earlier, but all 3 brands are good. You can go check them out at the local store(s) and see which feels the most comfortable to you if there are any units out of the case to look at.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
It's pretty much what I linked, DeWalt, or Porter Cable. Those 3 seem to have the biggest followings. I stand by the Bosch recommendation I gave earlier, but all 3 brands are good. You can go check them out at the local store(s) and see which feels the most comfortable to you if there are any units out of the case to look at.
Thank You very much

Now its just the decision making, of what and how much i really want to spend :)
 

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-If you're doing HDPE, you can use the regular straight bits that are normally used for wood, but I recommend that you get the Whiteside plastic cutting bit on Amazon. If you use the regular straight cut bits then go over your surface two or three times because plastic melts and gets messy. If your router is variable speed, then turn it down to something kinda low.
[/QUOTE]

I did some speaker rings out of King Starboard and it doesn't melt when using regular wood bits. It DOES make a mess tho.

Jay
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
-If you're doing HDPE, you can use the regular straight bits that are normally used for wood, but I recommend that you get the Whiteside plastic cutting bit on Amazon. If you use the regular straight cut bits then go over your surface two or three times because plastic melts and gets messy. If your router is variable speed, then turn it down to something kinda low.
I did some speaker rings out of King Starboard and it doesn't melt when using regular wood bits. It DOES make a mess tho.

Jay[/QUOTE]

I think I will go with bosh router, i found them way much cheeper than dewalt or any other well known brand.

I will use a regular bit, instead of plastic bit.

I will be doing that outside to piss off my neighbors so, there is no worries when it comes to having a mess :)
 

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I did some speaker rings out of King Starboard and it doesn't melt when using regular wood bits. It DOES make a mess tho.
What kind of wood bit? I cut some HDPE cutting boards first with a Porter Cable wood bit and a Bosch wood bit. I don't mean that the board melts but I was having the plastic melt back across the gap that I was cutting. It wasn't that bad - not deforming the ring notably, but it was not a clean cut. I had to go around a bunch of times to clear the plastic out.

I do have the fixed RPM version of the Bosch 1617, though. The one I linked is variable and thus more useful for non-wood materials. (You can even use it for reasonably thin aluminum with an end mill bit if you're careful and take necessary safety precautions)

With all of the bits that I used, cutting 3/8" HDPE would make a horrible banshee-like noise. It will definitely annoy your neighbors. And definitely wear ear protection. Extremely, extremely important.
 

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I bought this craftsman router for my router table.
Craftsman 14-amp, 2.5-hp Fixed/Plunge Base Router with Soft Start Technology

http://m.sears.com/productdetails.do?partNumber=00927680000P

Excellent power and good bases. Mine actually had three bases, including a D handle.

When I compared this to the other name brands, this one won out. I've put this thru some hard work with a buch of oak and it's a good un.

A lot of craftsman stuff has gotten cheap, but not this tool and I own a lot of dewalts, Bosch, and makitas to compare it to.

I personally use an old 1hp craftsman router (30 yrs old) and a homemade cutting board hole guide to cut my speaker rings. Keeps on working and putting out good results.

George
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Nice, I'm waiting till x-mas time, price on things should go down alittle :)

it should be a nice x-mas gift to myself.
 
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