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2020 Nissan Altima SR - White
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So as most of us know, when connecting large gauge wires we basically have three options. Compression, Crimp and Set Screw.

Set screw accessories seem to be the most popular and most attractive, but the downfall seems to be that the screw just goes down into the wire and spreads it apart reducing the surface area making solid contact.

So I have come up with a way to avoid this very cheaply and maintain an even more secure connection.


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Tools used.

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I flare the end to enable the wire to enter without fraying.

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After the flare process.

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Pipe cutter in action. The length depends on the depth of the hole in the block or fuse holder.

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Flared and cut piece.

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Cut through with the side cutters. For smaller gauge, use a narrower piece.

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Inserted into Distribution block. As you can see, the set screw will press against the copper which in turn will cup and compress the wire securely.

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Top view, not seen after insertion.

Hope this was helpful to someone. I've have used this and continue to use it with much success.
 

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its a clever idea, but honestly, its a solution in search of a problem.

Unless you are on the hairy edge of wire gauge size acceptance, its not that critical. if you need more wire contact area and more current carrying capability, move up a wire size. its just alot of extra work and tools, too.

I have used crimp connectors before, the big spade style, then curved the blade so the set screw would push the spade against the block for good contact area. made no difference.

You can solder the end of the wire too, then the setscrew really bites into it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for your contributions Guys. I am personally against any kind of soldering. I crimp everything, from 22 gauge to 1/0 gauge, bare or insulated. I use these guys below to handle all my crimping needs.

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·

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Couldn't get past shipping method! Need UPS or FEDEX account, total bullocks if you ask me. Definitely NOT worth it for my needs or for the needs of an average DIY'er who would use maybe 5 pieces of each size per install. I appreciate your attempt to shoot down my idea though, was a nice try!!
I was just showing that they do make them for all sizes of cable. That place was just what showed up with a quick search, there are many places that carry them.
 

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Great Tip! I do have pipe cutters, and a 3/8 L type 2ft copper can be purchased for under $5.00 and many ring terminals can be made with a 2 ft pipe, with a drill a hammer and the pipe cutter.

I have a lot of aluminum pipes, I am sure that can be used instead of copper, after all, it will just press the wire to make contact on the bottom of the dist block's hole.
 

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I do like the OP's creative solution, it cleverly cleans up a small problem. That being said, I simply tin the ends of the wires that are going into the socket and then the set screw bites into that.
 

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copper is a fine metal to compress the strands and give a bit of protection from the set screw's threads, not to mention about the best coincidental conductor but the problem arises (to me, hypothetically) in the softness of that barrier in repeated screw downs.

the first time, perhaps, the half-round holds it's shape enough to be removed in more or less, original dimension but a second round of good snug fit so that you compress the strands, and you'll have a piece of copper folded up around the screw.

as a possible improvement, one could perhaps source a half-round piece of tool steel that would not allow the screw to bite, but make a true compression with the copper.

where one might get such a blank is the trick, I'm sure there are suppliers with the exact curve necessary for any gauge insert, were one to put time towards the finding out.
 
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