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Discussion Starter #1
How would this combination match up in your opinion? (Only for the front channels) I know the JL is legendary, but the SKAR has such a nice look and smaller footprint, and I don't have to install an inline protection fuse either. Thanks for the suggestions
 

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How would this combination match up in your opinion? (Only for the front channels) I know the JL is legendary, but the SKAR has such a nice look and smaller footprint, and I don't have to install an inline protection fuse either. Thanks for the suggestions


Check out soundqubed. Small amps and they aren’t junk.


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Why wouldn't you need an in-line fuse with the Skar? I've never heard of an amp that doens't require an in-line fuse (between battery and amp)...
 

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It's not the amp that requires an external fuse, but rather the power cable feeding the amp. An amplifier's built'in fuse(s) cannot protect the external power cable feeding the amplifier.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Why wouldn't you need an in-line fuse with the Skar? I've never heard of an amp that doens't require an in-line fuse (between battery and amp)...
The JL audio amp does not have a ATC size blade fuse ON the amplifier chassis to protect the internals, so a SECOND in-line fuse should/can be used right next to the primary wire feeding the amp. I know, it totally baffled me too when I saw this amp.
 

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The JL audio amp does not have a ATC size blade fuse ON the amplifier chassis to protect the internals, so a SECOND in-line fuse should/can be used right next to the primary wire feeding the amp. I know, it totally baffled me too when I saw this amp.
Actually, you really don't need a second fuse right by the amp (depending on how things are wired up). I recently purchased a JL Audio amp as well and even though there are no fuses built-into the amp, the only fuse you need is the regular fuse at the battery. You do not need another fuse right at the amp as well - assuming you have a fused power wire directly connected to the battery.

From the JL Audio XD600/6v2 manual:
Connect the positive and negative power wires to the amplifier. A fuse near the amplifier is not necessary if the XD600/6v2 is the only device being run from the fused main power wire. If the fused main power wire is shared by the XD600/6v2 and other amplifiers or devices, fuse each amplifier/device within 12 inches (30 cm) of wire length, via a fused distribution block or multiple individual fuse blocks/on-board fuses.

In my case, since I have separately fused wires directly from the battery for my two devices (JL amp and my under-the-seat powered subwoofer), there is no need for a second fuse right at the JL Audio amp.

Honestly, I'm kind of curious why amps even come with fuses built into the amp itself. Any power-related issue that could hurt the amp itself should trip the fuse at the battery, right? Are they just for "double protection"?

Obviously, if you have one connection at the battery and are powering multiple devices from a non-fused distribution block, then you would need fuses for each fo the devices, but if using separate wires to the battery or a fused distribution block, why would fuses be needed in the amp itself? This is a question, since I don't know the answer. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #9
There are some amps, with very sensitive circuitry, (think old school Butler audio Tube Driver with an internal vacuum tube) or some great sounding amps with inherently bad design (think 90's precision power PPI and Powerclass amps). In the latter example, a very functional heatsink was completely enclosed in another outside metal cover. These amps would run hot and blow out internal capacitors, diodes...you name it. I still have two of those old school PPI amps and I have modified them with internal relay activated fans, and when I do decide to use them, will be using spacers on the mounting tabs for airflow clearance.

Also think about what happens if your car battery dies in a thunderstorm and you need a junpstart to get out of a hairy situation. The main higher rating in-line fuse would be allowing a surge to pass through the wire, along with the internals of an amp also being exposed to that surge, so smaller rating fuses at the power inlet of the amp have always been there to protect in these situations. JL audio must have some sort of State of the Art internal protection system. Maybe the ability to send the amp into protection mode without even being activated by the signal wire.
 
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