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Soldering really isn't my forte, but I think if you were to heat it back up, apply some desoldering wick, and give her a wipe they might be a bit more presentable.

The screw terminals have been something I've given a bit of thought about recently as well. Having one rattle loose is concerning. Loctite on the set screw could electrically isolate it, and though it would probably still work it wouldn't be ideal. However I think that adding a dab of adhesive after they've already been torqued down might keep them in place without consequence. A drop of CA would be invisible, but the residue. Perhaps a smidge of silicone, high temp rtv, shoe goo, etc instead as it could be removed more easily and cleanly? I'm unsure, but it's something I've given thought to.
Blue thread lock would still be best. Most those other alternatives would either weaken and break with the vibrations or not be strong enough. Loctite would not isolate the connection. The majority of the connection is made with the metal cup the wire is inserted in, not the set screw that is clamping the wire down to said metal cup.
 

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it could stiffen if the pre-existing solder wicked up it more. but again, if someone is taking that long to solder to a terminal, their soldering is the issue. that said, there are speakers you shouldnt solder to. Audiofrog GS for example. Reason being the terminals are held in by plastic.
Not to mention...use silver solder <shudder> :D

Silver solder and a small tip. You'd be surprised how long people will keep the heat on.
 

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I use a 100w blunt tip Rat Shack iron I've had forever with smaller diameter solder and always tin the wire first. I'm in and out like a thief in the night when I do have to solder something.
 

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Not to mention...use silver solder <shudder> :D

Silver solder and a small tip. You'd be surprised how long people will keep the heat on.
used silver solder for the first time last week. stuff smells like **** :laugh:
 

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Blue thread lock would still be best. Most those other alternatives would either weaken and break with the vibrations or not be strong enough. Loctite would not isolate the connection. The majority of the connection is made with the metal cup the wire is inserted in, not the set screw that is clamping the wire down to said metal cup.
At the end of the day I concede it wouldn't make much difference, but if it were to isolate the screw by forming a barrier between the screw and the lug you would ultimately be cutting the amount of metal to metal surface area making contact between the terminal and wire in half. Or so I envision. It would still function, but could it function more optimally is the question.

I seriously doubt that a thin smear of rubberized adhesive bonding the exterior of the set screw and terminal is going to fail, unless you manually peel it away. Though I've been wrong before.
 

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You ever soldered with lead and not wear a mask? Made that mistake once when soldering ESC and motor for RC. Next day I had a sore throat. Took me two sessions to realize it was the soldering causing the sore throat. hah
 

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At the end of the day I concede it wouldn't make much difference, but if it were to isolate the screw by forming a barrier between the screw and the lug you would ultimately be cutting the amount of metal to metal surface area making contact between the terminal and wire in half. Or so I envision. It would still function, but could it function more optimally is the question.
I haven't done any tests so only my opinion, but I see the set screw making 0 difference on connectivity. It's about surface contact for reduced resistance. The cup has much more surface than the screw and I'd say more than enough to suffice the connection you're making, making the set screw irrelevant.
 

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While I do agree soldering direct to the speaker terminals is your BEST connection I've found speakers are a lot harder to sell without practically giving them away when you're done with them if you have pigtails dangling off of the terminals. This is strictly my experience. The terminals on most speakers are made for female slide connectors and that's what I use now. Takes a bit of patience to get just the right fit but worth it in my opinion. Also, I HATE set screws on speakers and subs. Never fully trusted them. I wish Andy would completely do away with set screws on the Audiofrog drivers. Would also like to run an RE SEX sub again since I loved my old RE SE subs I owned but the set screws...and not sure if they sound the same as the ones made in Vegas years ago.
X2 on the AF screw-down terminals...I have had nothing but problems with the wire connections for my GB10's and GB25's. The GB10's have tiny openings for wire and if you tighten them the smallest bit too tight it cuts the wire...i even tried tinning the wire to make it a bit stronger and I still had issues. The GB25's are a bit more forgiving but both drivers ended up having issues with the internal connections from the terminal to the tinsel leads(intermittent connectivity)...I eventually had to solder wire leads to both terminals of both drivers...that really sucks considering their price-point. I would have preferred good ol'fashioned tabs to just connect spade connectors to. Oh well...they sound great and guess that's what counts.
 

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Do they not make ferrules that small?

If not, you may be able to pull the screw and file it a bit if there are any rough edges causing the wire snipping. I've encountered this a bunch in another hobby of sorts, and that sometimes helps. I've sourced different set screws altogether once or twice because of this issue.
 

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I haven't done any tests so only my opinion, but I see the set screw making 0 difference on connectivity. It's about surface contact for reduced resistance. The cup has much more surface than the screw and I'd say more than enough to suffice the connection you're making, making the set screw irrelevant.
I agree. Practically speaking, it likely makes zero difference. Still though, some people do go to extremes when it comes to their wires and connections in the audio field. The type to gravitate towards something like graphine contact enhancers might balk at the idea of losing even a small fraction of the connection which they spent big bucks wiring up.

The only thing that even gives me pause is the power one might be dealing with when it comes to a sub. If the connection is slightly compromised to begin with and things manage to loosen up it might be inclined to heat that terminal block up. But if you're at that point your biggest issue isn't an abundance of loctite.
 

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About 10 years ago I built a box for a pair of Quantum 10's. Ported box for the trunk of a former co-worker's Caprice...ANYWAY, one of the set screws on his dvc subs was mostly stripped out. Installer who he forced to rush the original install and sorry excuse for a box musta done it. I was able to get somewhat of a bite and screwed them down. He tried to rush me but I told him if he wanted it done right he'd have to wait another day!
 

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9 times out of 10 it's either cheap tools, cheap screws, or a combination of the two. Nothing will strip ya faster than a cheap bit that doesn't seat properly.. except perhaps some of the I can't believe it's not butter screws that ship with some otherwise good products.

Not like we're torquing down a control arm to 100 ft-lbs, it's a set screw to hold a wire. We really shouldn't have to be terrified of stripping them. But terrified we are, lol, because god help you once you round it out.
 

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a good set of hex tools goes a long way. I know very well from my RC Heli hobby. It is not fun getting out a loctited rounded out bolt/set screw.
 

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Hi guys:

i have Morel Maximo 6 component set. I soldered the connections onto the speakers. I didn’t burn or damage anything. U just need to do it right and fast.

now, 9 months after install, one of 4 mids is lightly blown. Only makes slight crackling sound at low volume. Still outputs sound at moderate and high volume with no noticeable distortion at such volume levels. It’s actually difficult to hear at all.

crutchfield is sending out a replacement, and I need to send back this blown one as still in warranty.

does anyone have any experience of warranty refusals due to soldering connections onto the speakers?

thanks, rob
 

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I've heard it all now. soldering wire to the speaker terminal can damage the VC, thats absurd unless you really have zero idea how to solder. do it right with slide on connectors, silly as hell, solder is your very best connection, period, unless you have no idea how to solder
this,
i like the option of the solder with the quick disconnect. a cheaper option is a 2 pole trailer disconnect, but he yellow connectors are cool
 

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No one is going to damage the voice coil by soldering to the terminal. The tinsel leads are another story entirely. You probably won't damage them, but you could apply enough solder (if you're not good at this) that the solder would travel up the leads and make a portion of them stiff. This is not a good idea.

In some of our speakers (GS, specifically), the basket is plastic and inside the basket there's a PCB to which the terminals are soldered that also holds the crossover (in coaxial models). So, turn the speaker over and solder to the terminal for too long and the solder flows away from the terminal to board connection and the speaker doesn't work. But no matter how many times I suggest to people that soldering to these is a bad idea because it melts the plastic and the solder on the PCB, they argue with me because "solder is the best connection"...and this despite sending them excerpts from the NASA connection guide. Solder for terminal to board. Crimp for wire to terminal. Crimp for splices unless you plan to strain relieve the splice.

The spade lug terminals work great, despite what people think. Remember those old washing machines and dryers that used to last for 40 years? This was how almost every connection inside those things was made. There are probably 50 billion or more of those connections on earth and they all work fine. But someone who crimps with a pair of pliers unless the terminal is big enough to hit with a hammer says they suck...
 
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