DiyMobileAudio.com Car Stereo Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,534 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Most cars (well most hatchbacks I've owned) have a set of cabin vents near the rear tail lights or rear bumper that I'm guessing are designed to suck out stale air using physics and aerodynamics and stuff. I'm in the process of deadening my hatch area right now, and I'm wondering if I should simply cover them up with CCF and MLV sheet, or cut holes to keep them functional?

I have a theory that air passing through these holes are a large part of the noise I'm hearing at highway speeds. If that's so, I'd like them gone for good. I'm sure the engineers put them there for a good reason, but figured I'd ask.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,227 Posts
Test it. Use an SPL meter to get a baseline and then use a temporary cover for the vent then run the test again.

Mine is practically covered by a fiberglass enclosure, but it's a sedan anyway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
they are there to make shutting the doors easier.
Agreed.

When I completely deadened my truck I covered the cab vents and while it did make the doors a little harder to close, I just made sure I was the last one closing my door if people were with me just because I knew the right ammount of force (not a lot of force) that it took to close it completely.

I say do it and forget about it.

P.S. I did notice more pressure on my ears when the vent fan was used in the non-recirculate mode because there was no vent for the air to go out of. It felt like when a plane pressurizes.


Sent from Tapatalk.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,741 Posts
Agreed.

When I completely deadened my truck I covered the cab vents and while it did make the door a little harder to close, I just made sure I was the last one closing my door if people were with me just because I knew the right ammount of force (not a lot of force) that it took to close it completely.

I say do it and forget about it.


Sent from Tapatalk.
In some of the older pickups with the sliding glass window in the rear window the window would tend to pop out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
In some of the older pickups with the sliding glass window in the rear window the window would tend to pop out.
That is true but since the OP has a new mini I don't think he will have any problem. And because there is no window frame on the front driver/pass door I believe (might be convertible model only) the windows crack about 1/4 when they are being opened or closed to vent air from the cab.

Sent from Tapatalk.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,534 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
crispin said:
they are there to make shutting the doors easier.
Thank you, that makes perfect sense. :idea3: I ended up covering them up with the big CCF/MLV sheets in the hatch/rear seat area, and drove it around.. It's a LOT quieter (maybe 6 dB), and that was just my first piece. Still have to do the rear quarter panels, under the front seats, front firewall, and under the headliner.

And because there is no window frame on the front driver/pass door I believe (might be convertible model only) the windows crack about 1/4 when they are being opened or closed to vent air from the cab.
Correct, that's true of all MINI models, not just convertibles. They crack them when the door is open so that when they close, they don't hit the rubber weather seal which is outboard of the window glass. It has an added benefit of venting any pressure as you mentioned. It does make it a pain if you open/close the door with the battery disconnected, both otherwise it's a pretty slick feature.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top