DiyMobileAudio.com Car Stereo Forum banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So I picked up a 20sq ft pack of AlphaDamp for my front doors in a '98 Jeep Cherokee. My main goal of this is to increase the midbass from my Focal Polyglass 165VR's.

I am looking for some tips (maybe even a previous post) giving some detailed advice on where and how much deadener to apply to doors. My understanding is that to increase the midbass, you want to cover up all the holes in the door. I am wondering though if I should use just enough to bridge the holes, or should I just cover the entire door with AlphaDamp?

Also, should I just apply AlphaDamp to the outer surface of the door, or should I take the door apart, and apply deadener there as well?



-----------------------------
'98 Jeep Cherokee
Focal 165VR's -Front
Peerless SLS mid's -Rear
2 12" Treo SSi's
Zapco Reference 650.6
Kicker 1500.1
1 and 4 Gauge KnuKonceptz wiring
Pioneer P7200HD
Big 3 Upgrade in 0 Gauge.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
546 Posts
First off, I would just deaden the outter skin. Cut the deadener into small peices and space them out evenly over the whole door. Rule of thumb is 25% coverage. There aint much of a difference if you install more. The next big thing, as you mentioned, is to seal the access holes. This will separate the front from the rear waves of the speaker. Theres a slew of ways to go about it. Personally, I cut a plastic cutting board to fit in my access wholes and screwed them in. This way, if I or anyone else needs to get in the door, they can just remove the screws and the board. I also used duct seal all the way around the cutting board, speaker baffle and other little areas to ensure that there were no air leaks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
112 Posts
I saw another good trick in another post here the other day: Place 1lb of non hardneing modelling clay around each speaker baffle. This mass loads the door at the point of the vibration source, rather than mass loading the entire door.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,534 Posts
I saw another good trick in another post here the other day: Place 1lb of non hardneing modelling clay around each speaker baffle. This mass loads the door at the point of the vibration source, rather than mass loading the entire door.
I did the non-hardening modelling clay, and it gets really oily and loses is adhesion after about a week. I'll be replacing it with butyl rubber based duct seal, which I think AmitaF (or someone else, I don't recall) did a comparison on, and the duct seal won hands-down.

Here's a link to it on Amazon... It's about 7x cheaper than the modelling clay I bought as well.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000BO8XD6/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
401 Posts
I did the non-hardening modelling clay, and it gets really oily and loses is adhesion after about a week. I'll be replacing it with butyl rubber based duct seal, which I think AmitaF (or someone else, I don't recall) did a comparison on, and the duct seal won hands-down.

Here's a link to it on Amazon... It's about 7x cheaper than the modelling clay I bought as well.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000BO8XD6/
Sounds like you used an oil based clay. You need a wax based clay.

I used a wax based clay in my 6x9 adapters to plug holes that werent being used by my 6.5" and my tweeter. Still there and no oily residue after a full year.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,291 Posts
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top