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Discussion Starter #1
I'm sitting here contemplating my $1.79 bag of 3/16" female disconnects and wondering if they'll do the job long-term in terms of the mids I'll install in my doors. They appear to be of good quality (not gold plated). In the past, I've even soldered directly to the speaker leads. Can someone comment on their favorite method?
 

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I've predominantly used the female terminals (insulated type) without issue, even in my current off-road driven vehicle. If you're concerned, you could use a bit of solder and/or adhesive-lined heatshrink to ensure they don't come off. The solder alone would provide a better connection, but the adhesive-lined shrink will help hold together and protect as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Many thanks-- I wasn't aware of adhesive-lined shrink wrap, must seek some out. More than anything I'm concerned about corrosion at the connection but I suppose that any steps that I take to keep out moisture (dialectric grease?) will be beneficial.

About the only thing that impresses me about the stock system in my Mazda 5 are the sealed speaker connections, one area where the OEMs have an edge...
 

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What I'd do is solder some small gauge wire (18 or smaller) to the speaker leads and then crimp quick disconnects to the end of the pigtail. That way you aren't limited to what type of protection you can use.
 

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For me, I use a standard female insulated terminal. Standard crimp to hold the terminal to the wire, then vicegrip the rest of the wire-side connection to make sure it's on good and tight. Then heat shrink for good looks
 

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Nothing beats soldering under shrink tubing. If you are worried about disconnecting them, just leave enough slack that you can cut and resolder them. If you own your car for a long time, I could see the connections eventually getting corroded.
 

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A glob of dielectric or high pressure marine grease over the connections (after connected of course)has always worked for me. The one time I went "commando" on some drivers, the terminals rusted.*

(Found out later it happens frequently on those drivers- Kicker RMB's- due to galvanic corrosion, not rust).
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Cool...a few good options. Longevity is what I have in mind; after averaging about 2 years apiece for the past 5 cars I've "owned", I'd like to make this Mazda my daily driver for a good 5 years anyway, and not get back into the doors again during that time period, unless or course a driver fails...
 
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