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Discussion Starter #1
First I'd like to thank this wonderful community for striving as it does. Its all thanks to the contributions made by you guys!! :D

So I have a quick question I seem to be, thus far, getting different answers for:
Individually, what specifications determines a speaker's max loudness, and what determines the level of sound clarity?
Also, what determines the [combined] continuous high level of clarity as you go higher and higher in volume? (quality of source sound aside. Assume flawless [lossless] quality)

*I am only interested in the speaker's performance specifications independent of an AMP or other devices which can otherwise help the sound by proxy.

I believe what I am describing is also called distortion. If that's true then particularly I am asking what specs determine 0% distortion until a particular increased volume level?


Thank you very much for your willingness to help ahead of time! :)
 

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Loudness per power input is sensitivity.
Clarity = speaker operating within its intended range ie proper crossover.
 

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Hi,

High xmax enable you to move more air thus increasing sound pressure. Cone material is another factor. Aluminium tend to have some high frequency resonance, but generally have higher resolution than paper. Transistant response is determined by Le (inductance of the voice coil), you want as low as possible for better transistant response. A non linjear BL curve between +/- Xmax can introduce distorsion, a stronger BL will increase the cone's damping. The negative aspect is that higher damping usually means earlier rolloff. The most important thing is how the speaker is installed, which enclosure it's mounted in and so on. In a sealed enclosure strive against having a qtc of .707 (best compromise between spl and transistant response). If you talking about a dedicated midrange/tweeter you don't want to play anywhere near fs (free air resonance). When using a 2nd order filter use crossovers one octave above fs to avoid damage and high distortion levels.

All I can think of now, sure I've missed something though;)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hi,

High xmax enable you to move more air thus increasing sound pressure. Cone material is another factor. Aluminium tend to have some high frequency resonance, but generally have higher resolution than paper. Transistant response is determined by Le (inductance of the voice coil), you want as low as possible for better transistant response. A non linjear BL curve between +/- Xmax can introduce distorsion, a stronger BL will increase the cone's damping. The negative aspect is that higher damping usually means earlier rolloff. The most important thing is how the speaker is installed, which enclosure it's mounted in and so on. In a sealed enclosure strive against having a qtc of .707 (best compromise between spl and transistant response). If you talking about a dedicated midrange/tweeter you don't want to play anywhere near fs (free air resonance). When using a 2nd order filter use crossovers one octave above fs to avoid damage and high distortion levels.

All I can think of now, sure I've missed something though;)
So optimally I should look for a speaker that:

1) Has its cone material made from aluminum
2) Frequency Response of ~20 Hz - ~22 kHz
3) a wide enough Xmax travel space for the driver (which is how much? what is considered above average?)
4) How its installed (I'm good at this), and its enclosure (whats best? wood? what design?)
5) A good combination of SPL & Watt per speaker (which is?)

Speaker's Purpose: play production music (orchestral/classical) with the highest fidelity.



The long shot:I am not looking for some cheap plastic "ok" speakers that will just "do". The speakers I am looking to get have a particular purpose and those audio tracks have been seen to utilize the entire Frequency Range capability of a speaker (some tracks have upwards of 100 instruments playing) at the same time.

I know the following question is very subjective and is probably the most popular question on this board period. But,

Got any speaker model recommendations based on my previous descriptions starting with the least expensive of course? :)
 

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So optimally I should look for a speaker that:

1) Has its cone material made from aluminum
2) Frequency Response of ~20 Hz - ~22 kHz
3) a wide enough Xmax travel space for the driver (which is how much? what is considered above average?)
4) How its installed (I'm good at this), and its enclosure (whats best? wood? what design?)
5) A good combination of SPL & Watt per speaker (which is?)

Speaker's Purpose: play production music (orchestral/classical) with the highest fidelity.



The long shot:I am not looking for some cheap plastic "ok" speakers that will just "do". The speakers I am looking to get have a particular purpose and those audio tracks have been seen to utilize the entire Frequency Range capability of a speaker (some tracks have upwards of 100 instruments playing) at the same time.

I know the following question is very subjective and is probably the most popular question on this board period. But,

Got any speaker model recommendations based on my previous descriptions starting with the least expensive of course? :)
No.

That's the problem with buying speakers, there is no way to define "SQ". The best you can do is find a speaker that sounds the way you like. Sure some of the things mentioned should be considered, like cone material. But some people love aluminum tweeters whereas other people hate them. You want to look at FR graphs to find a speaker that is going to plan the range that you need it to. Sensitivity will give you an idea of how loud they'll play off of the power you have.

There are a lot of specs when it comes to speakers that can be modeled and give a good understanding of what the speaker can do. But, you will not find a single speaker out there that can cover 20hz-22khz at an appropriate level and sound good doing it. Speaker material is about personal preference so there is no "optimal" material. Xmax is a good spec, but higher doesn't mean a speaker is better, it just means it can travel further. The more excursion you ask from a speaker, the more distortion you get.

That didn't help you out much did it?
 

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One thing you can do though in lieu of listening to many many many speakers (if you can't or something) is you can check out reviews, like the ones on this site, as well as the Klippel tests done on speakers. Take reviews with a grain of salt, because everyone's tastes are different, but generally if you read enough reviews on something you tend to get a good idea on what it's cabable of and what it's good for.
 

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So optimally I should look for a speaker that:

1) Has its cone material made from aluminum
2) Frequency Response of ~20 Hz - ~22 kHz
3) a wide enough Xmax travel space for the driver (which is how much? what is considered above average?)
4) How its installed (I'm good at this), and its enclosure (whats best? wood? what design?)
5) A good combination of SPL & Watt per speaker (which is?)

Speaker's Purpose: play production music (orchestral/classical) with the highest fidelity.



The long shot:I am not looking for some cheap plastic "ok" speakers that will just "do". The speakers I am looking to get have a particular purpose and those audio tracks have been seen to utilize the entire Frequency Range capability of a speaker (some tracks have upwards of 100 instruments playing) at the same time.

I know the following question is very subjective and is probably the most popular question on this board period. But,

Got any speaker model recommendations based on my previous descriptions starting with the least expensive of course? :)
Aluminum is a tradeoff, paper is a tradeoff, kevlar is a tradeoff. Don't go shopping for a certain speaker material, because that is a false guideline. Some of the best midranges are made out of paper.
 

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I personally prefer paper over aluminium. Especially midranges/tweeters have this harsh tone I don't like. I have DLS Iridium 8.3i (3way system) in my car and they are one of the better speakers I've heard with great tonality and stage height due to the dome midrange on the dash. There are many good sounding speakers out there. Best you can do is to listen and compare, preferably in a car and in a shop, it will not sound the same. Another thing to consider is the break-in period. Some speakers need 15-25 hours of continuous music to sound correct!

A high xmax is important in open baffle mounting for example, I usually don't push my mids/subs more than 70-80% of the usable xmax range due to the increasing distorsion levels beyond that. If you want some extra spl you can always add another sub/mid and get a 3db increase in that range with maintained cone excursion. As for the T/S parameters I suggest you play around with WinISD, a pretty simple little modelling app, try changing some of values and see what effect it has on the frequency response. You can simulate cabingain with the linkwitz transform, although a little buggy. Try entering a high Le and look how it acts like a lowpass filter, or how Vas and Qts affect your ideal enclosure volume. ;). Happy hunting for your new speakers!
 
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