DiyMobileAudio.com Car Stereo Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Before I begin my question, I just wanted to say thanks to all those on this board. This board has been a huge help and has really convinced me to look into many different options in system building for my new truck.

Ok, so here's the question.
Many years back, while I was in high school, a friend of mine used to make sub enclosures for friends and the like. He would make the boxes out of MDF while using a little of the high school trigonometry we had learned. He'd throw in some insulation material for the finishing touches, and we'd always joke about it being pink panther insulation.

Getting to the point, for our closer circle of friends, he would also treat the box with some kind of sealant after construction. However, he never did it himself. He would take the box to a shop that is now no longer in business, and have the treatment done there. Over the years, the shop owner never revealed the ingredents of the sealant. But, he always called it the "secret sauce."

I can tell you guys this. When drying, 24-48 hours, it would smell like the most awful combination of Thompson's water sealant, mustard, and the most sour smell possible.

So, the reason for this whole story, is the question, does anyone "treat" their sub enclosures anymore? Is that a thing of the past? If not, anyone care to share their findings on a secret sauce recipie?
Thanks in advance!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
127 Posts
It depends what design goal you have in mind. If your subwoofer enclosure is going to be exposed to moisture, and it's made out of MDF, then you are going to want to treat it with something that will repel the water. However, if you're never planning on riding your enclosure down the river, treating the OUTSIDE isn't very useful.

Treating the inside of the box can have some benefits, though. Coating the inside with some sort of sealant can make sure that the box is completely sealed off. Coating the inside can also reduce resonances by adding more weight to the panels of the box, as well as increase rigidity if the substance hardens after curing/drying.

My 2¢.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Yes, I was talking about treating the inside of the box. Sorry, I wasn't more specific, I figured that was implied.

Anyone else know anything about treating the inside of their boxes?
Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
989 Posts
I've heard of people having their boxes covered in Rhyno Liner, or more preferably Line-X on the inside and outside of the enclosure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
I line the interior of my enclosures with fiberglass resin. It smooths the walls out and provides perfect seal.

In a sealed enclosure I doubt the difference is even audible but with ported enclosure several people have reported gains due to the lower turbulence.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
I have been an installer, [car audio] for over 30 years, and was installing "subs" in cars before there were "subs" for cars, for that matter before there were amps for cars, [we had a very talented repair tech at our shop] but back to the point, it didn't take me long to understand a few things about making bass, wood is the best box material, the denser the wood the better, the more airtight the box the better, [that goes double for vented boxs] I have used softwood, hardwood, plywood and other materials, [plexiglas, metal and others] to build box's and have found MDF to be the most cost effective and convenient "wood" to use for box's, I knew nothing about MDF or even if it was around way back then, I didn't start using it till about 15 years ago, although "partical board" was around and I had used it.
Back to the issue, although MDF has a lot of advantages over other materials, airtightness is not one of them, even 1" MDF is porous and I "paint" the inside of all the sub cabinets I build with fiberglass resin, I also run a bead of silicon along every seam and also will make sure speaker has an airtight seal by cutting mounting hole to the proper size, using a gasget and/or routering the outside diam. of the speaker into the MDF a little, [just enough to remove the much harder surface of the MDF]
all of these things are done to make sure the box is sealed, not sealing the inside of a box will make for a less then perfect speaker cabinet :(
This is my first post at this site, and after reading a lot of other posts here I understand there are going to be some changes, I do not understand what the changes are, I am not computer literate, I also can't spell worth a damn, and can not find the "spell check" that I find on other sites, like www.honda-tech.com it would make posting here a lot easier for me. :oops:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the replies!
All the input has been really helpful! I'm glad to hear that there are others out there sealing the insides of their enclosures too!

Anyone else use anything besides fiberglass resin? Would epoxy resin or any other resin serve the same purpose?

Thanks!
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top