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Discussion Starter #1
I'm building a new center channel for my home stereo. I'm going to use Tang Band W5-1611SA 5" full range speakers from PE. I'm going to use 4 of them to get me more surface area and output since they're only 28w.

My question is that I was wanting to do them ported but am running out of surface area on the baffle and didn't know what it would do for sound and output to put the port on the rear of the enclosure firing towards a wall. I wasn't sure if it would make the tuning lower since the sound would travel farther to meet up with the sound on the front.

I built a bracket to the front of my entertainment center to hang my flat screen TV and the center channel will go above it and I was thinking of putting a subwoofer behind it firing toward the wall and was also concerned that the sub might cancel out the sound from the port.

Any ideas?
 

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Regarding the subwoofer, I'd experiment with placement of the subwoofer in your listening space. I've found that having my subwoofer in a corner of the room helped to eliminate standing waves.

Having the sub in front of you may cause some cancellation issues, but don't take my word at all. I'd first give it a try. If your bass response is lackluster, and if you have the options, try moving it around your room.

Plus, if you have a decent sized sub, you can use it as a piece of furniture if it's in the corner of your room. Mine has a lamp on top of it, so it's not as obtrusive as it was before lol....or a candy dish ; )
 

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Don't be afraid to rear-port the center channel. I've experimented with such designs and have noticed improved bass response from this configuration due to the port coupling with the wall behind it if it's within a foot or so. Make sure there is plenty of space around the speaker so it isn't muffled. As far as integrating the sub, many sub amps provide a phase adjustment dial which will allow you to match the phase from other speakers at the crossover point. Using a cheap RTA and some pink noise you can dial that in to have a smooth transition, no matter where you place the sub. In fact, that is a good idea regardless of whether you port the center channel or not.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I've got an RTA and was planning on playing with it. The only reason I was thinking of doing my sub behind the TV was so we didn't have to see it, to keep the wife happy.
As far as the ports on the center channe, I think I would rather port it out the rear, it would make the design a little easier I think.
 

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Go for it. One benefit to having the sub up front is that localization will not be a problem if you cross it over high. My sub is right behind the couch so I had to set it to 50Hz before I couldn't tell where it is. 80Hz+ will be fine for you if you need it. If you encounter any bad room modes, you can tame them with a parametric eq, but just try it out and measure - it might work out with minimal tweaking.
 

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as these are usually used for movies and you have a sub, you can also use them sealed (check the specs first to see if they are good for sealed). Rear porting should be ok as long as you keep some space on the back.
Why 4 of them, most probably you will be ok with just 2 of them. Make sure you place them close to each other, since there is no tweeter, these will be reproducing high frequencies also.
 
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