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Greetings everyone :)

So it seems like its been forever since I last posted an install log...well technically almost 3 months, which sorta IS like an eternity for me in some sense. :)

But we have been working really hard the past few months, setting up the new facility and getting things figured out.

Originally, we were not planning on taking a car until we have the entire shop, including the all important fabrication room finished. but when the owner of this 2006 Accord approached me with a slew of gear he already purchased, i figured it would be a good project to test the waters with while we are building the rest of the fabrication room.

it turned out pretty neat, though not having any major tools setup made for a pretty inefficient process...haha tripping over stacks of 2x4s on the way to and from the table saw was not fun. :D

so lets get started, first the goals for the car.

1. achieve a nice level of SQ on a reasonable budget

2. properly utilize products he already purchased (only thing i supplied was the DSP and the Subwoofer)

3. Do a simple and stealthy build in the trunk that maximizes storage space and maintains the backseat fold down pass through.

but at the same time, we also outline some goal for ourselves.

1. Figure out the most efficient way Joey and I can work together on a car

2. Utilize some new techniques that Joey brings to the table

3. learn new tips and tricks from each other, though admittedly, more me learning from him. :)

so lets get started. right off the bat, knowing that this is an accord, we chose to run dual 4 gauge cables intead of a single zero, as there is very little clearance in the door sills for a 0 gauge sized wire. here is the wiring at the battery and the installation of the single 0 dual 4 fused block.



Now if you look closely, you will see the block is sitting on a frame, and this is the first custom built metal frame of any sort by Simplicity In Sound, in very quick time, Joey fabricated this mounting bracket that utilizes OEM bolts and is study enough to rock the entire car with :D





Moving to the inside, a customer supplied Alpine 9886 headunit was installed in a pocket replacement kit under the oem radio, we hooked up the steering wheel controls to it as well:



being a used unit, the alpine's harness was not in great shape, took a while to clean it all up and reorganize it into the new bundle:



Moving into the front stage....which consists of a set of Hybrid Audio's Legatia SE line that the customer had purchased.

First headache of the day was to get speaker wires into the driver side door. anyone with this car knows its not an easy task, but after some careful drilling, i was able to get a pair of stinger 16 gauge into it, its not as thick as i would like, but it sure beats the stock 22 gauge and the run is only about a foot long:





next, the outer door skin received a generous helping of Focal Blackhole Tile to help reduce resonance.



next, the rest of the door was treated with a full layer of Focal BAM XXXL composite damper, while the area around the speaker opening was treatd with STP gold damper. the stock hole was also enlarged to accomodate the much bigger HAT L6SE.



we then installed 3 1/4" rivet nuts to hold the adapter baffle in place:



next, Joey fabbed up a set of adapter baffles out of 3/4" mdf, to account for the odd shapes and contours of the oem mounting location, he ground down the mdf preceisely so it would fit flush with the metal door skin, these were then coated with 3 layers of truck bedliner:





the baffle was then bolted to the door, and a strip of butyl rope goes around all the edges to seal the baffle to the door.



then, the HAT L6SE was wired up and installed:





the passenger side received the same treatment:













the inside of the plastic door card also received some STP damper around the speaker mounting point, after the plastic walls were shaved off:





moving onto the mid and highs, which was a pair of L3SE and L1 ring radiator. I played with a few different mounting options and settled on this design, the main goal was to clear the rather tall insturment cluster shroud to minimize unwanted reflections. from past few experiences, i also lowered the aiming of the tweeter as to not get a stage that is at or above the rear view mirror, which to me seems way to high :)

the pillars are wrapped in factory matching one piece vinyl, and the L3 is usually covered by a press fit grille:









pop off the grilles for a quick look at the L3SE:





and a quick shot of both pillar pods from the back seat:





a few quick build pic of the pillars:

first the ring baffles were aimed and attached:





then grille cloth was pulled, resin applied, and a duraglass/resin mixture was poured into the inside to reinfoce them:





they were then fillered and sanded smooth:



and wrapped with a single piece of vinyl:





and the grilles were made:



this is kind of a useless pic since the screen is washed out lol but the system uses a Mosconi 6to8 DSP so all tuning can be done from the front seat. :)

 

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next come a series of pics that shows the wiring bundles as they travel from the front of the car to the back. on the driver side went the dual 4 gauge power cables and the left side speaker wires, while the right side speaker wires, RCAs and remote wires went down the passenger side:

























I then took off the rear deck cover, removed the factory 6x9s to gain better bass venting into the cabin, and sound proofed the rear deck with BAM XXXL:





Moving to the major attraction, the trunk :)

So the idea, as mentioned, was to have a set up that is stealthy and take away as little room as possible. With typical honda built vehicles of this general, it means a side enclosure with a trunk mounted amp rack.

So here is the finalized design we came up with...first the view with the grilles in place:



a 1 cubic foot enclosure is on the driver side, while a similar shapoed cutout is in the middle of the floor. a new fake floor panel matches the shape and thickness of the oem floor cover.

lift off both grilles and here is what you see. a Mcintosh MC406M 6 channel amplifier resides int he floor, while a Seas Lotus 12" subwoofer is in the subbox. both items are trimmed in red vinyl matching the exterior of the car and both hole a similar rectangular/trapezoid shape.

our new logo is done in raised vinyl lettering behind the amplifier.









a close up of the amp and the SIS logo:



and the Seas lotus Sub:



and finally, two quick kicks from afar:



 

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the mcintosh amp is only half the story, as you will see in the build pics coming up now.

first, Joey used a different technique to build the box, using mdf pieced together and bonded with fiberglass, it allows him to more tightly control the total volume of the enclosure. here is the back mold:



then we sorta skipped a bunch of pics in between lol...but basically, the front portion was also done using pieced mdf, and the gaps to the oem carpeting is filled in with duraglass. this allows him to achieve a much more controlled contour versus a simple frame and mold cloth approach.

here is the finalized enclosure before upholstery, i installed 8 T-nuts from the backside to allow the sub to be bolted down securely:



we then attached a piece of red vinyl to the front baffle face of the enclosure, trimmed it, and taped it up:



and here is the rest of the enclosure ready for carpeting:







here is the two part grille that Joey made to snuggly fit over the opening of the enclosure:







I then dyed the carpeted pieces a little bit darker to better match the OEM carpet:



Finally, the carpet was trimmed at the edge and we have our sub box ready to go:





the subbox is then bolted to the car via two rivet nuts and bolts:



as with all my fake floors, the build start with a leveled support platform at the very bottom. this is the board which is attached to the car via three rivet nuts:





due to the fact that the amps he chose were quite large, the only place i could tuck the Mosconi DSP is on this foundation board below the amps, so that was wired up first:



here is the trim panel before and after red vinyl was applied:







here is the top fake floor before carpeting:





if you are wondering what those grille are, well, they line up directly over the heatsink vents and fans of a msconi AS200.4, which is tucked out of view in the build. :)



this piece was then carpeted, along with the press fit center grille:









and then both pieces were dyed darker:





finally, three wiring pics. the reason why both amps were shown is that they are of such contrastic design and size it would look very much out of place, so as much as i love Mosconi, i am goin to show off the bigger mac as it is more centrally installed and provides a bigger foot print in an other carpeted trunk floor.

the mosconi amp sends 200 watts to each midbass, and 700 watts to the sub, while the Mac 6 channel is bridged into a 4 channel, sending over 150 watts to each midrange and 50 watts to each tweeter.







so thats it, our first build in our brand new facility. I am quite impressed with how it went despite not having anything set up and Joey and I having never worked together before. I love the new techniques and expereinces he brings along and just make the entire build more efficient with a higher level of execution. :)

the car sounds quite good after an initial tuning session.

stage is quite high, half way up the windshield and higher on female vocals, well defined, depth and width is decent, tonally, the midbass is very impressive with nice smooth midrange and highs. the seas sub is very impressive, dry, blends superbly, yet is able to get down and boogie :)

Next, we are taking a week off to finish building the fabrication room, and then all the real fun starts!!! :D
 

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Pretty sweet first install! kinda looks like what this other guy did in his garage at home :p

What is the blue material on the pillars that you used to form the grill mounting area?
 

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got damn, you are a ****ing animal!
 

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ack, ive only had my 'new to me' used subaru 1996 legacy for 2 weeks, and ive been telling myself i dont need to mess with the audio, the $120 blaupunkt cd player and whatever speakers are in there sounds ok.

but looking through this thread reminds me what is possible.....

must resist....


resistance is futile....
 

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the mcintosh amp is only half the story, as you will see in the build pics coming up now.

first, Joey used a different technique to build the box, using mdf pieced together and bonded with fiberglass, it allows him to more tightly control the total volume of the enclosure. here is the back mold:



then we sorta skipped a bunch of pics in between lol...but basically, the front portion was also done using pieced mdf, and the gaps to the oem carpeting is filled in with duraglass. this allows him to achieve a much more controlled contour versus a simple frame and mold cloth approach.

here is the finalized enclosure before upholstery, i installed 8 T-nuts from the backside to allow the sub to be bolted down securely:



we then attached a piece of red vinyl to the front baffle face of the enclosure, trimmed it, and taped it up:



and here is the rest of the enclosure ready for carpeting:







[QUOTE/]

This is a sick method of construction. I'll give it a whirl if steered away from Infinite Baffle.
 

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It looks like a really nice install Bing!!!

Remember, IB is very stealthy and takes very little space as well. I like how you constructed the sub box, I have done many the exact same (with using multiple pieces of mdf). The only thing I not diggin' is how the sub box fits...it looks a little out of place, not blending in all that well with the area around it. I like some others you have done better. But as long as it sounds good, that is all that really matters (and the customer being happy). I love the new logo, BTW!
 

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Thanks guys! I think the fun thing will be to look back at this thread in a few months and compare what the background pictures of the shop look like compared to what they will look like then. Hopefully it's a big change!
Things here are slowly starting to come together. It has been a LOT of work. It is been a very fun experience so far. Tomorrow I will start building the metal stock rack and the frame for the outfeed table/router tables. I think it will be a pretty cool setup, we will have 2 table saws, 3 router stations, full remotely controlled dust collection, and lots of little storage areas.
 

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This build is something special! It tells a story and I enjoyed every part of it! I am so excited for my build with Joey's metal fab work and everything he brings to the table with you Bing! Congrats to both of you and your venture with SIS! Loving this!
 

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Excellent job Joey and Bing! It breaks my heart to see the mosconi stuff tucked out of view but keeping it uncluttered with the 2 different styles of equipment was the better choice. As a result the trunk looks so clean and well thought out. Fantastic conceptualization and execution, as always.
 

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Bing first of all you do some awesome work!!! Thanks for sharing with us the tips and tricks of the trade. I have a few questions. I currently have L3se/ L1 se r2 combo in the upper door of my vehicle. I use a MS-8 and the center channel is a L6se/L1 r2 combo in a FG enclosure on top of the dash. Scott sat in my car at SBN and recommended I move the L3se/ L1 combo up to the A pillar covers like this install. My question is I noticed you aimed both the L3 and L1 at or just behind the rear view mirror. I was curious if you experimented with aiming the L1 more on axis? Such as more towards the headrest, and if so what made you decide to go the way you did?

I have noticed you using the blue heat formable plastic to create a mounting surface to hold a grill. Could you possibly tell me where is it available to purchase?

I am trying to better understand how you built the A Pillar pods. I have built a few FG enclosures. I build the skeleton then stretch t-shirt material over to get the shape I desire. Then coat with polyester resin and proceed to build up with additional layers of glass and resin. After attaining the desired strength I use Rage Gold to smooth out the surface and finalize shape. In your notes accompanying the pillar fabrication you only mention one layer of material and dura glass. This is the part I am confused about. Do you have any more detailed pics or can you refer me to another of your builds on another thread that shows more detail?

Thanks!
 

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Bing first of all you do some awesome work!!! Thanks for sharing with us the tips and tricks of the trade. I have a few questions. I currently have L3se/ L1 se r2 combo in the upper door of my vehicle. I use a MS-8 and the center channel is a L6se/L1 r2 combo in a FG enclosure on top of the dash. Scott sat in my car at SBN and recommended I move the L3se/ L1 combo up to the A pillar covers like this install. My question is I noticed you aimed both the L3 and L1 at or just behind the rear view mirror. I was curious if you experimented with aiming the L1 more on axis? Such as more towards the headrest, and if so what made you decide to go the way you did?

I have noticed you using the blue heat formable plastic to create a mounting surface to hold a grill. Could you possibly tell me where is it available to purchase?

I am trying to better understand how you built the A Pillar pods. I have built a few FG enclosures. I build the skeleton then stretch t-shirt material over to get the shape I desire. Then coat with polyester resin and proceed to build up with additional layers of glass and resin. After attaining the desired strength I use Rage Gold to smooth out the surface and finalize shape. In your notes accompanying the pillar fabrication you only mention one layer of material and dura glass. This is the part I am confused about. Do you have any more detailed pics or can you refer me to another of your builds on another thread that shows more detail?

Thanks!
1. my goal on this car is to clear the mid as much as possible, from the top of the instrument cluster shroud, if done fully on axis, it would probably help a bit on tonality, but, it would also result in quite a big pod that would obscure a lot of vision. not my cup of tea and IMO a lot can be accomplished by tuning. to me there is also some give and take when it comes to imaging and staging, depth, etc when going full on axis verus a certain degree off. but the absolute most important thing is, you want to listen with your own ears, try different layouts in your own car and see what works best for you :)

2. its low heat plastic, and i get it from AAMP, find your local stinger dealer and tey should be able to order you a sheet or sell you some strips if they have them.

3. any kind of fiberglass work i always try to reinforce from the inside, pull a nice pattern with the mold cloth, resin and leave that smooth for easy sanding. for a pillar pods, i mix up a batch of resin and duraglass, so its a gooey but flowy milkshake, and then i pour it into the inside of hte pod and it forms almost a solid wall within. to the point that i can literally stand on some of these pods and the plastic pillar would break long before the fiberglass portion :) it also helps to permanently bond the whole thing to the plastic.

b
 
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